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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Roman Coins ▸ The Tetrarchy ▸ MaxentiusView Options:  |  |  |   

Maxentius, February 307 - 28 October 312 A.D.

Maxentius was the son of Maximianus, and a talented soldier. On 28 October 306 A.D., in rebellion against Severus II, the Italians and Praetorian Guard raised Maxentius to the rank of Caesar. He quickly invited his father, who had been forced to abdicate, to resume rule. Although declared a public enemy at the famed Conference of Carnutum, Maxentius remained in control of Italy until 312 A.D. At the famous Battle of Milvian Bridge he fell from the bridge and drowned in the Tiber. His demoralized army was defeated by Constantine I.


Romulus, Son of Maxentius, Died 309 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
David Sear identifies this simple round building without columns as the Sepulcher of Divus Romulus. The ruins of this tomb, which are sometimes erroneously called the stables of the Circus of Caracalla, are situated in a large quadrilateral enclosure forming part of the villa of Maxentius on the Appian way, about one mile from the gate of S. Sebastian.

RT84362. Billon half follis, Hunter V 8, RIC VI Ostia 59, Cohen VII 9, SRCV IV 15051, gF, well centered, porous, weight 5.949 g, maximum diameter 23.0 mm, die axis 180o, 3rd officina, Ostia (port of Rome) mint, late 309 - 310 A.D.; obverse DIVO ROMVLO N V BIS CONS, bare head right; reverse AETERNAE MEMORIAE, Sepulcher of Divus Romulus, brick facade, dome-shaped roof, no columns, right door open, surmounted by eagle with spread wings, MOSTT in exergue; scarce; $180.00 (€160.20)
 




  



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OBVERSE LEGENDS

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REFERENCES

Calicó, E. Xavier. The Roman Avrei, Vol. II: From Didius Julianus to Constantius I, 193 AD - 335 AD. (Barcelona, 2003).
Cohen, H. Description historique des monnaies frappées sous l'Empire Romain, Vol. 7: Carausius to Constantine & sons. (Paris, 1888).
Depeyrot, G. Les monnaies d'or de Diocletien à Constantin I (284-337). (Wetteren, 1995).
Drost, V. Le monnayage de Maxence. (Zürich, 2013).
Gautier, G. "Le monnayage d'argent de Serdica après la réforme de Dioclétien" in RN XXXIII (1991).
King, C.E. & Sear, D.R. Roman Silver Coins, Volume V, Carausius to Romulus Augustus. (London, 1987).
Paolucci, R. & A. Zub. La monetazione di Aquileia Romana. (Padova, 2000).
Robinson, A. Roman Imperial Coins in the Hunter Coin Cabinet, University of Glasgow, Vol. V. Diocletian (Reform) to Zeno. (Oxford, 1982).
Sear, D.R. Roman Coins and Their Values, Vol. IV: The Tetrarchies and the Rise of the House of Constantine...Diocletian To Constantine I, AD 284 - 337. (London, 211).
Sutherland, R.A.C. & C.H.V. Carson. The Roman Imperial Coinage, Vol VI, From Diocletian's reform to the death of Maximinus. (London, 1967).
Vagi, D. Coinage and History of the Roman Empire. (Sidney, 1999).

Catalog current as of Friday, January 20, 2017.
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Roman Coins of Maxentius