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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Roman Coins| ▸ |The Tetrarchy| ▸ |Maximinus II||View Options:  |  |  |   

Maximinus II Daia, late 309 - 30 April 313 A.D.

Maximinus II was made Caesar in the Tetrarchy in 305 A.D. In 311, Maximinus took advantage of the death of Galerius to invade and annex the latter's territory. In 313 A.D., he invaded Licinius' territory, and although he seized many cities his army was utterly destroyed in a battle on the 30th of April. He disguised himself as a slave and fled, falling ill and dying in the city of Tarsus.


Maximinus II Daia, Late 309 - 30 April 313 A.D.

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Some features on this coin have been recut to make it appear less worn.
RT56012. Billon follis, RIC VI Antiochia 144, Tooled, weight 5.332 g, maximum diameter 24.3 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 310 A.D.; obverse MAXIMINVS NOB CAES, helmeted and cuirassed bust left, spear in right over shoulder, shield on left arm decorated with two riders and four figures, aegis on chest; reverse SOLI INVICTAE, Sol holding globe in right and raising left, riding in a facing quadriga, two horses split in each direction, B in center, ANT in exergue; very rare (R3); SOLD


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This officina is unlisted in RIC for the type. This series was issued after Maximinus briefly captured Heraclea prior to his defeat by Constantine.

The Farnese Hercules is one of the most famous ancient sculptures. It is a colossal copy made after a smaller Lysippos original, and intended to adorn the Baths of Caracalla. The sculpture was discovered and removed from the baths in 1546, entering the famous collection of Alessandro Farnese. It now resides in the museum of Naples.

The Farnese Hercules is also known on coins of other Eastern mints such as Antioch, Cyzicus and Nicomedia. It is interesting that the type was adopted when these cities entered under Maximinus' authority, so we might assume he selected it himself. We do not know if he ever had a chance to visit Rome and Caracalla's Baths. Maybe someone from his entourage did. Perhaps he saw a copy in an Eastern city.
SH30698. Billon follis, RIC VI Heraclea 77 var. (only officina ∆ listed, R2), Choice EF, weight 5.375 g, maximum diameter 21.9 mm, die axis 180o, Heraclea (Marmara Ereglisi, Turkey) mint, 313 A.D.; obverse IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMINVS P F AVG, laureate head right; reverse HERCVLI VICTORI, the "Farnese Hercules" standing right, right hand behind back, left resting on club draped with lion's skin, A left, SMHT in exergue; very rare; SOLD


DIVO Galerius, 1 March 305 - 5 May 311 A.D., Struck Under Maximinus II

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This DIVO Galerius posthumous type struck under Maximinus II is published for the Alexandria mint (RIC VI 133). This is the only Antioch mint example known to Forum.
RT79563. Billon follis, Apparently unpublished; RIC VI -, Hunter V -, Cohen VII -, VF, dark green patina, light earthen deposits, weight 6.510 g, maximum diameter 22.6 mm, die axis 0o, 2nd officina, Antioch mint, posthumous, 311 - 313 A.D.; obverse DIVO MAXIMIANO MAXIMINVS AVG FIL, laureate head right; reverse AETERNAE MEMORIAE GALERI MAXIMIANI, lighted altar, garlanded, ornamented on front panel with eagle standing left on garland, head right, wreath in beak, B right, ANT in exergue; ex CNG e-auction 233 (26 May 2010), lot 398 (realized $310 plus fees); extremely rare; SOLD


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This reverse type unlisted in RIC for the (officina / *) issue of 312 A.D.

The Farnese Hercules is one of the most famous ancient sculptures. It is a colossal copy made after a smaller Lysippos original, and intended to adorn the Baths of Caracalla. The sculpture was discovered and removed from the baths in 1546, entering the famous collection of Alessandro Farnese. It now resides in the museum of Naples.

The Farnese Hercules is also known on coins of other Eastern mints such as Cyzicus and Nicomedia. It is interesting that the type was adopted when these cities entered under Maximinus' authority, so we might assume he selected it himself. We do not know if he ever had a chance to visit Rome and Caracalla's Baths. Maybe someone from his entourage did. Perhaps he saw a copy in an Eastern city.
SH25867. Billon follis, RIC VI Cyzicus -, aEF, weight 4.331 g, maximum diameter 20.9 mm, die axis 0o, Cyzicus (Kapu Dagh, Turkey) mint, 312 A.D.; obverse IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMINVS P F AVG, laureate head right; reverse HERCVLI VICTORI, the "Farnese Hercules" standing right, right hand behind back, left resting on club draped with lion's skin, B left, star right, ANT in exergue; nice black patina with highlighting desert earthen fill; extremely rare; SOLD


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On this coin the reverse legend is unbroken and the quadriga and Sol are smaller than usual. RIC only lists the type with a C-T legend break. This only example of this type with an unbroken legend known to Forum.
SH32677. Billon argenteus, RIC VI Treveri 826 var. (reverse legend broken C-T), aEF/VF, weight 2.831 g, maximum diameter 19.3 mm, die axis 180o, Treveri (Trier, Germany) mint, c. 309 - 313 A.D.; obverse IMP MAXIMINVS AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust left, raising right, holding globe in left; reverse SOLI INVICTO COMITI (to the unconquered Sun, minister [of the Emperor]), Sol standing in a facing quadriga, radiate, raising right hand commanding sunrise, whip and globe in left hand, cloak billowing out behind, PTR in exergue; near full circles strike, grainy but still better than typical condition for the issue; rare; SOLD


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In Roman religion, every man has a genius, a presiding spirit. In De Die Natali, Censorinus says, from the moment we are born, we live under the guard and tutelage of Genius. Cities, organizations, and peoples also had a genius. On coins, we find inscriptions to the Genius of the Army, of the Senate, of the Emperor, etc. The legend GENIO POP ROM dedicates this coin to the Genius of the Roman People. Genius' image is of a man with a cloak half covering the shoulders, most often leaving the rest of his body naked, holding a cornucopia in one hand, and a simpulum or a patera in the other.
RT04218. Billon follis, RIC VI Londinium 209b, SRCV IV 14856, Cohen VII 69, Hunter V -, aUNC, weight 4.46 g, maximum diameter 23.4 mm, die axis 180o, Londinium (London, England) mint, c. mid 310 - 312 A.D.; obverse IMP MAXIMINVS P F AVG, laureate and cuirassed bust right; reverse GENIO POP ROM (to the guardian spirit of the Roman people), turreted Genius standing left, chlamys over shoulder and around hips and legs, pouring libations from patera in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, * right, PLN in exergue; from the Aiello Collection; SOLD


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SH04232. Billon follis, RIC VI Cyzicus 49, gem uncirculated, weight 6.94 g, maximum diameter 25.8 mm, die axis 180o, Cyzicus (Kapu Dagh, Turkey) mint, 308 - 309 A.D.; obverse GAL VAL MAXIMIANVS NOB C, Laureate head right; reverse VIRTVTI EXERCITVS (to the valor of the army), Virtus advancing right holding transverse spear in right and trophy over left shoulderΓ left, MKV in exergue; from the Aiello Collection; SOLD


DIVO Galerius, 1 March 305 - 5 May 311 A.D., struck under Maximinus II

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DIVO posthumous issue struck under Maximinus II.
SH33652. Billon follis, RIC VI Cyzicus 75 var. (unlisted officina), VF, weight 5.455 g, maximum diameter 26.7 mm, die axis 180o, Cyzicus (Kapu Dagh, Turkey) mint, posthumous, 311 A.D.; obverse DIVO MAXIMIANO MAXIMINVS AVG FIL, laureate head right; reverse AETERNAE MEMORIAE GALERI MAXIMIANI, lighted altar, garlanded, ornamented on front panel with eagle standing left, head right, wreath in beak, MKVA in exergue; cleaning scratches, ex Zach Beasley architectural theme collection; very rare; SOLD


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In Roman religion, every man has a genius, a presiding spirit. In De Die Natali, Censorinus says, from the moment we are born, we live under the guard and tutelage of Genius. Cities, organizations, and peoples also had a genius. On coins, we find inscriptions to the Genius of the Army, of the Senate, of the Emperor, etc. The legend GENIO CAESARIS dedicates this coin to the Genius of the Caesars. Genius' image is of a man with a cloak half covering the shoulders leaving the rest of his body naked, holding a cornucopia in one hand, and a simpulum or a patera in the other.
RT83016. Billon follis, RIC VI Alexandria 100a, Choice aEF, weight 6.730 g, maximum diameter 23.1 mm, die axis 180o, Alexandria mint, as caesar, late 308 - 310 A.D.; obverse GAL VAL MAXIMINVS NOB C, laureate head right; reverse GENIO CAESARIS (to the guardian spirit of the prince), Genius standing left, modius on head, patera in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, K - S / P at sides, ALE in exergue; SOLD


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Virtus was a specific virtue in ancient Rome. It carried connotations of valor, manliness, excellence, courage, character, and worth, perceived as masculine strengths (from Latin vir, "man"). Virtus applied exclusively to a man's behavior in the public sphere, that is to the application of duty to the res publica in the cursus honorum. Private business was no place to earn virtus, even when it involved courage or feats of arms or other good qualities. There could be no virtue in exploiting one's manliness in the pursuit of personal wealth, for example. It was thus a frequently stated virtue of Roman emperors and was personified as the deity Virtus.
SH82542. Billon follis, RIC VI Alexandria 141, Choice EF, weight 6.824 g, maximum diameter 24.9 mm, die axis 180o, Alexandria mint, 311 A.D.; obverse IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMINVS P F AVG, laureate head right; reverse VIRTVS EXERCITI (courage of the army), Virtus advancing right holding transverse spear in right hand, in left shield and trophy over shoulder, crescent and K left, B and P right, ALE in exergue; full circle centering; scarce; SOLD




  




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|OBVERSE| LEGENDS|

GAVALMAXIMINVSNOBC
GALVALMAXIMINVSNC
GALVALMAXIMINVSNOBC
GALVALMAXIMINVSNOBCAES
GALVALMAXIMINVSNOBCAESAR
GALVALMAXIMINVSNOBILC
GALVALMAXIMINVSPFAVG
IMPCGALVALMAXIMINOPFINVAVG
IMPCGALVALMAXIMINVSPFAVG
IMPCGALVALMAXIMINVSPFINVAVG
IMPCGALVALERMAXIMINVSPFAVG
IMPCGALERVALMAXIMINVSPFAVG
IMPMAXIMINVSAVG
IMPMAXIMINVSPAVG
IMPMAXIMINVSPFAVG
MAXIMINVSAVG
MAXIMINVSCAES
MAXIMINVSCAESAR
MAXIMINVSFILAVGG
MAXIMINVSNC
MAXIMINVSNOBC
MAXIMINVSNOBCAES
MAXIMINVSNOBCAESAR
MAXIMINVSNOBCS
MAXIMINVSNOBILC
MAXIMINVSNOBILICAES
MAXIMINVSNOBILISC
MAXIMINVSNOBILISCAES
MAXIMINVSNOBILISSIMVSCAES
MAXIMINVSNOBILISSIMVSCAESAR
MAXIMINVSPFAVG


REFERENCES|

Calic, E. Xavier. The Roman Avrei, Vol. II: From Didius Julianus to Constantius I, 193 AD - 335 AD. (Barcelona, 2003).
Cohen, H. Description historique des monnaies frappes sous l'Empire Romain, Vol. 7: Carausius to Constantine & sons. (Paris, 1888).
Depeyrot, G. Les monnaies d'or de Diocletien Constantin I (284-337). (Wetteren, 1995).
King, C. & Sear, D. Roman Silver Coins, Vol. V, Carausius to Romulus Augustus. (London, 1987).
McAlee, R. The Coins of Roman Antioch. (Lancaster, PA, 2007).
Paolucci, R. & A. Zub. La monetazione di Aquileia Romana. (Padova, 2000).
Robinson, A. Roman Imperial Coins in the Hunter Coin Cabinet, University of Glasgow, Vol. V. Diocletian (Reform) to Zeno. (Oxford, 1982).
Sear, D. Roman Coins and Their Values, Vol. IV: The Tetrarchies and the Rise of the House of Constantine...Diocletian To Constantine I, AD 284 - 337. (London, 211).
Sutherland, R. & C. Carson. The Roman Imperial Coinage, Vol. VI, From Diocletian's reform to the death of Maximinus. (London, 1967).
Vagi, D. Coinage and History of the Roman Empire. (Sidney, 1999).
Van Heesch, J. "The last civic coinages and the religious policy of Maximinus Daza (AD 312)" in NC 1993. pp. 65 - 75, pl 11.

Catalog current as of Wednesday, October 16, 2019.
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Roman Coins of Maximinus II