Coins and Antiquities Consignment Shop
  Welcome Guest. Please login or register. All items are guaranteed authentic for eternity! Please call us if you have questions 252-646-1958. Thanks for your business! Welcome Guest. Please login or register. Internet challenged? We are happy to take your order over the phone. Please call if you have questions 252-646-1958. Thanks for your business!

Catalog Main Menu
Fine Coins Showcase

Antiquities Showcase
Recent Additions
Recent Price Reductions

Show empty categories
Shop Search
Shopping Cart
Contact Us
About Forum
Shopping at Forum
Our Guarantee
Payment Options
Shipping Options & Fees
Privacy & Security
Forum Staff
Selling Your Coins
Identifying Your Coin
FAQs
   View Categories
Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Roman Coins ▸ Constantinian EraView Options:  |  |  |   

Roman coins of the Constantinian Era

Constantius II, 22 May 337 - 3 November 361 A.D., Issued by Vetranio

Click for a larger photo
In 312 A.D., Constantine dreamed he saw a Christogram in the sky and heard the words IN HOC SIGNO VICTOR ERIS, meaning in Latin "In this sign, you will be the victor." He ordered the sign of Christ on his legions standards and shields. He won a great victory and later became the first Christian Roman Emperor.
RL90728. Billon maiorina, RIC VIII Siscia 284 (S), LRBC II 1171, Voetter 48, SRCV V 18903, Cohen VII 3, gVF, oval flan, encrustation, flan split, weight 5.040 g, maximum diameter 23.2 mm, die axis 0o, 3rd officina, Siscia (Sisak, Croatia) mint, issued by Vetranio, 1 Mar - 25 Dec 350 A.D.; obverse D N CONSTANTIVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right, A behind, star in front; reverse CONCORDIA MILITVM (harmony with the soldiers), Constantius standing half-left, in military dress, labarum (Chi-Rho standard) in each hand, A left, star above, ΓSIS in exergue; scarce; $180.00 (153.00)


Lot of 5 Choice gVF+ Bronze Coins - Roman Emperor Constantine the Great and his Sons, 307 - 337 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Flavius Valerius Constantinus, Constantine the Great, was the son of Helena and the First Tetrarchic ruler Constantius I. Constantine is most famous for his conversion to Christianity after the battle of the Milvian Bridge where he defeated emperor Maxentius. Before the battle, he saw the words "In Hoc Signo Victor Eris" (By this sign you shall conquer) emblazoned on the sun around the Chi Rho, the symbol of Christianity. After placing this Christogram on the shields of his army, he defeated his opponent and thus ruled the empire through divine providence. He also shifted the capital of the empire to Constantinople, establishing the foundation for an Empire that would last another 1000 years. He died in 337 and his sons divided the Roman territories.
LT87360. Bronze Lot, 5 coins of Constantine and his sons, 17.4 - 18.7 mm, all Choice gVF+ , with attractive highlighting "desert" patinas, struck under Constantine, 307 - 337 A.D.; no specific identification, no tags or flips, the lot is the actual coins in the photograph; $180.00 (153.00)


City of Constantinople Commemorative, 330 - 331 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
On 11 May 330, Constantine I refounded Byzantium, renamed it Constantinopolis after himself, and moved the capital of the Roman Empire from Rome to his new city. The new capital was Christian, old gods and traditions were either replaced or assimilated into a framework of Christian symbolism. Constantine built the new Church of the Holy Apostles on the site of a temple to Aphrodite. Generations later there was the story that a divine vision led Constantine to this spot. The capital would often be compared to the 'old' Rome as Nova Roma Constantinopolitana, the "New Rome of Constantinople." Special commemorative coins were issued with types for both Rome and Constantinople to advertise the importance of the new capital.
RL82770. Billon reduced centenionalis, Hunter V 3 (also 2nd officina), RIC VII Trier 543, LRBC I 66, SRCV IV 16445, Cohen VII 21, EF, sharp detail, slightly off center on a tight flan, clashed reverse die, weight 2.398 g, maximum diameter 16.4 mm, die axis 180o, 2nd officina, Treveri (Trier, Germany) mint, 330 - 331 A.D.; obverse CONSTANTINOPOLIS, laureate and helmeted bust of Constantinopolis left, wearing imperial cloak, scepter over left shoulder; reverse Victory standing left, right foot on prow, scepter in right hand, resting left hand on grounded shield, TRS in exergue; $160.00 (136.00)


Lot of 10 VF Bronze Coins - Roman Emperor Constantine the Great and his Sons, 307 - 337 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Flavius Valerius Constantinus, Constantine the Great, was the son of Helena and the First Tetrarchic ruler Constantius I. Constantine is most famous for his conversion to Christianity after the battle of the Milvian Bridge where he defeated emperor Maxentius. Before the battle, he saw the words "In Hoc Signo Victor Eris" (By this sign you shall conquer) emblazoned on the sun around the Chi Rho, the symbol of Christianity. After placing this Christogram on the shields of his army, he defeated his opponent and thus ruled the empire through divine providence. He also shifted the capital of the empire to Constantinople, establishing the foundation for an Empire that would last another 1000 years. He died in 337 and his sons divided the Roman territories.
LT87364. Bronze Lot, 10 coins of Constantine and his sons, 16.9 - 19.3 mm, VF, nice coins with attractive earthen highlighting desert patinas, struck under Constantine, 307 - 337 A.D.; no specific identification, no tags or flips, the lot is the actual coins in the photograph; $150.00 (127.50)


Lot of 3 St. Helena, Augusta, 8 November 324 - c. 330 A.D., Mother of Constantine the Great

Click for a larger photo
Helena, first wife of Constantius I and mother of Constantine I, was abandoned by her husband but brought to the court by her son and given many titles. She had immense political influence and was instrumental in the growth of Christianity. She is a saint in the Roman Catholic and Eastern Orthodox churches.
LT87675. Bronze Lot, 3 bronze coins of St. Helena, 15.8 to 19.7 mm, no flips or tags, the lot is the actual coins in the photograph; $150.00 (127.50)


Crispus, Caesar, 1 March 317 - 326 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
On 7 March 321, Constantine issued an edict proclaiming Dies Solis Invicti (Sunday) as the day of rest; trade was forbidden but agriculture was allowed.
RL77188. Billon centenionalis, RIC VII Lyons 133, Hunter V 25, SRCV IV 16734, Bastien XIII 102, Cohen VII 6, Choice EF, dark toning on silvering, weight 3.120 g, maximum diameter 18.7 mm, die axis 0o, 1st officina, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, 321 A.D.; obverse CRISPVS NOB CAES, laureate and cuirassed bust right; reverse BEATA TRANQVILLITAS (blessed tranquility), altar inscribed VO/TIS / XX in three lines, surmounted by globe, three stars above, C left, R right, PLG crescent in exergue; $125.00 (106.25)


Constantine II, 22 May 337 - March or April 340 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Constantine II was about eight years old when this coin was minted. Here he is draped and cuirassed as a powerful child Caesar with the world in his hands!
SH63721. Billon centenionalis, RIC VII Trier 382 (R3) corr. (no cuirass), SRCV V 17155, Cohen VII 23, gVF, well centered on a tight flan, nice green patina, weight 2.868 g, maximum diameter 18.0 mm, die axis 180o, 2nd officina, Treveri (Trier, Germany) mint, 322 - 323 A.D.; obverse CONSTANTINVS IVN NOB C, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust left, Victory on globe offering wreath in right hand, mappa in left, head of Medusa on cuirass; reverse BEATA TRANQVILLITAS (blessed tranquility), altar inscribed VO/TIS / XX, surmounted by globe, three stars above, STR in exergue; rare; $120.00 (102.00)


Constantius II, 22 May 337 - 3 November 361 A.D., Issued by Vetranio

Click for a larger photo
In 312 A.D., Constantine dreamed he saw a Christogram in the sky and heard the words IN HOC SIGNO VICTOR ERIS, meaning in Latin "In this sign, you will be the victor." He ordered the sign of Christ on his legions standards and shields. He won a great victory and later became the first Christian Roman Emperor.
RL73908. Billon heavy maiorina, RIC VIII Siscia 286 (S), LRBC II 1173, Voetter 51, SRCV V 18203, VF, well centered and struck, nice green patina, spots of corrosion on the obverse, small edge cracks, weight 4.277 g, maximum diameter 21.4 mm, die axis 0o, 3rd officina, Siscia (Sisak, Croatia) mint, issued by Vetranio, 1 Mar - 25 Dec 350 A.D.; obverse D N CONSTANTIVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right, A behind, star before; reverse HOC SIGNO VICTOR ERIS, Constantius standing facing head left, holding labarum (Chi Rho Christogram standard) and spear, Victory right crowning him, A left, ΓSIS in exergue; scarce; $120.00 (102.00)


Constantine II, 22 May 337 - March or April 340 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Constantine II was about eight years old when this coin was minted. Here he is draped and cuirassed as a powerful child Caesar with the world in his hands!
RL12133. Billon centenionalis, RIC VII Trier 382 (R3) corr. (no cuirass), SRCV V 17157 var. (bust), Cohen VII 23, aEF, superb bust type, broad flan, slightly uneven strike, reverse legend weak, weight 3.018 g, maximum diameter 19.7 mm, die axis 315o, 2nd officina, Treveri (Trier, Germany) mint, 323 A.D.; obverse CONSTANTINVS IVN NOB C, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust left, Victory on globe offering wreath in right hand, mappa in left, head of Medusa on cuirass; reverse BEATA TRANQVILLITAS (blessed tranquility), altar inscribed VO/TIS / XX, surmounted by globe, three stars above, STR crescent in exergue; rare; $120.00 (102.00)


Constantius II as Caesar, 324-337 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
In 328 Arelatum was renamed Constantia in honor of Constantine II. After Constantine II was killed in 340, the name reverted to Arelate, only to be changed again in 354 to Constantia by Constantius II. It retained that name, although the mintmark 'AR' appeared on some of its coins even in the fifth century.
RL86836. Billon follis, RIC VII Arles 323, LRBC I 333, SRCV V 17665, Cohen VIII 314, Hunter V -, gVF, brown patina, weight 3.213 g, maximum diameter 19.9 mm, die axis 180o, 4th officina, Arelatum (Arles, France) mint, as caesar, 328 A.D.; obverse FL IVL CONSTANTIVS NOB C, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust left; reverse VIRTVS CAESS (the valor of the two princes), campgate with four turrets, star above, gates open, each door with two panels, each panel ornamented with two dots, S - F flanking at sides, QCONST in exergue; Vauctions sale 250 (5 Aug 2010), lot 167; ex Zachary "Beast" Beasley Collection of Camp Gates; $120.00 (102.00)




  







Catalog current as of Wednesday, November 21, 2018.
Page created in 0.735 seconds.
Constantinian Era