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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Roman Coins ▸ The Adoptive Emperors ▸ CrispinaView Options:  |  |  |   

Crispina, wife of Commodus, Augusta 178 - 182 A.D.

Crispina was married to emperor Commodus in 177A.D., in an effort to foster some virtue in the young Caesar. Unfortunately, Crispina was a vain and haughty, if beautiful, and did little to improve Commodus' character. She was implicated in a plot to kill Commodus in 182. She was exiled to Capri with Lucilla and murdered soon after.


Commodus and Crispina, 177 - 192 A.D.

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SH34908. Bronze medallion, Gnecchi II, p. 72, 2 and Pl 91, 9 (same dies); Gbl MIR 1078; Cohen III 3, Fine/Fair, weight 41.742 g, maximum diameter 35.7 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 177 A.D.; obverse IMP COMMODVS AVG GERM SARM CRISPINA AVG, draped bust of Crispina right facing laureate and draped bust of young Commodus left; reverse VOTA PVBLICA, Commodus (on left) and Crispina (on right, veiled) standing confronted, clasping hands, Concordia stands behind them in the center with her arms around their shoulders; ex Spink; very rare; SOLD


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RS20273. Silver denarius, RIC III 286a, RSC II 21, BMCRE IV 41, SRCV II 6002, EF, toned, weight 2.707 g, maximum diameter 18.4 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 180 - 182 A.D.; obverse CRISPINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right; reverse VENVS, Venus standing left holding apple and gathering up drapery on shoulder; scarce; SOLD


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RS33550. Silver denarius, RIC III 279, RSC II 9, BMCRE IV 29, Choice gVF, weight 3.403 g, maximum diameter 19.3 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 180 - 182 A.D.; obverse CRISPINA AVG, draped bust right; reverse CONCORDIA (harmony), clasped hands; scarce; SOLD


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Hilaritas, the personification of rejoicing, is usually depicted as a matron, standing with a cornucopia in her left hand and a long palm frond on the ground in her right. Green branches were a sign of gladness and for special occasions, both public and private, it was the custom in ancient times to ornament streets, temples, gates, houses, and even entire cities, with branches and leaves of trees. This tradition carries on today in the form of wreaths and Christmas trees.
RS67692. Silver denarius, RIC III 282, RSC II 18, BMCRE IV 40, VF, weight 3.436 g, maximum diameter 18.3 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 180 - 182 A.D.; obverse CRISPINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right; reverse HILARITAS, Hilaritas standing left, long grounded palm branch in right hand, cornucopia in left; scarce; SOLD


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Juno Lucina was the Goddess of Light and of childbirth. In her honour, on 1st of March the Roman matrons celebrated the festival Matronalia and it was customary for their husbands or lovers to present gifts.
RB10976. Copper as, RIC III 680, Cohen III 24, BMCRE IV 433, SRCV II 6018, VF, weight 11.378 g, maximum diameter 25.09 mm, die axis 135o, Rome mint, 180 - 182 A.D.; obverse CRISPINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right; reverse IVNO LVCINA S C, Juno standing left, holding patera and scepter; nice surfaces and patina, ex John Jencek; scarce; SOLD


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Ceres, equated with the Greek Demeter, is the Roman goddess of growing plants (particularly cereals) and of motherly relationships. Ceres is a favored goddess of neo-pagans.
RS48873. Silver denarius, RIC III 276, RSC II 1, BMCRE IV 33, Hunter II 5, SRCV II 5995, VF, nice portrait, struck with worn reverse die, weight 2.559 g, maximum diameter 19.0 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, c. 180 - 182 A.D.; obverse CRISPINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right, hair waived and drawn back in coil; reverse CERES, Ceres standing left, veiled, grain ears in right hand, long torch in left hand; SOLD


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In Roman religion, Concordia was the goddess of agreement, understanding, and marital harmony. The cult of Concordia Augusta ("Majestic Harmony") was of special importance to the imperial household. She is usually depicted wearing a long cloak and holding a patera (sacrificial bowl), a cornucopia (symbol of prosperity), or a caduceus (symbol of peace).
RS79831. Silver denarius, RIC III 279; RSC II 9; BMCRE IV p. 693, 29; Hunter II 7; SRCV II 5997, Choice VF, well centered, nice portrait, edge cracks, weight 3.085 g, maximum diameter 17.8 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 180 - 182 A.D.; obverse CRISPINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right, hair waved, pulled back and knotted in coil low on back of head; reverse CONCORDIA (harmony), clasped hands; SOLD


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Juno was the chief female divinity in the Roman pantheon, the protector and special counselor of the Roman state, and a member of the Capitoline Triad. She was a daughter of Saturn, the sister and wife of Jupiter, and the mother of Juventas, Mars, and Vulcan. She had many different aspects, such as Juno Moneta, Juno Sospita, and Juno Lucina, but here she is depicted as Juno Regina, "Juno the Queen." Juno is usually shown holding a patera, scepter or a statuette of Athena, and is often accompanied by a peacock. Her Greek equivalent is Hera.
RS67696. Silver denarius, RIC III 283, RSC II 21, BMCRE IV 41, Hunter II 10, SRCV II 6001, VF, nicely centered, weight 3.078 g, maximum diameter 18.6 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 180 - 182 A.D.; obverse CRISPINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right; reverse IVNO, Juno standing facing, veiled, head left, patera in right hand, long scepter in left hand, peacock left at feet on left; scarce; SOLD


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Juno was the chief female divinity in the Roman pantheon, the protector and special counselor of the Roman state, and a member of the Capitoline Triad. She was a daughter of Saturn, the sister and wife of Jupiter, and the mother of Juventas, Mars, and Vulcan. She had many different aspects, such as Juno Moneta, Juno Sospita, and Juno Lucina, but here she is depicted as Juno Regina, "Juno the Queen." Juno is usually shown holding a patera, scepter or a statuette of Athena, and is often accompanied by a peacock. Her Greek equivalent is Hera.
RS67693. Silver denarius, RIC III 283, RSC II 21, BMCRE IV 41, Hunter II 10, SRCV II 6001, Choice VF, weight 3.263 g, maximum diameter 19.06 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 180 - 182 A.D.; obverse CRISPINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right; reverse IVNO, Juno standing facing, veiled, head left, patera in right hand, long scepter in left hand, peacock left at feet on left; scarce; SOLD


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This type invokes the Gods of Childbirth, however, there is no record of the offspring from Commodus and Crispina.
RS73660. Silver denarius, RIC III 281 (R), RSC II 15, Hunter II 3, BMCRE IV 31, SRCV II 5999 var. (AVGVSTA), VF, well centered, weight 2.940 g, maximum diameter 17.9 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 180 - 182 A.D.; obverse CRISPINA AVG, draped bust right; reverse DIS GENITALIBVS, large square altar, flames at top center, horns(?) at sides of top; rare; SOLD




  




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OBVERSE LEGENDS

CRISPINAAVG
CRISPINAAVGIMPCOMMODIAVG
CRISPINAAVGVSTA


REFERENCES

Banti, A. & L. Simonetti. Corpus Nummorum Romanorum. (Florence, 1972-1979).
Calic, E. The Roman Avrei, Vol. I: From the Republic to Pertinax, 196 BC - 193 AD. (Barcelona, 2003).
Cayn, J. Los Sestercios del Imperio Romano, Vol. III: De Marco Aurelio a Caracalla (Del 161 d.C. al 217 d.C.). (Madrid, 1984).
Cohen, H. Description historique des monnaies frappes sous l'Empire Romain, Vol. 3: Marcus Aurelius to Clodius Albinus. (Paris, 1883).
Mattingly, H. & E. Sydenham. The Roman Imperial Coinage, Vol. III: Antoninus Pius to Commodus. (London, 1930).
Mattingly, H. & R. Carson. Coins of the Roman Empire in the British Museum, Vol. 4: Antoninus Pius to Commodus. (London, 1940).
Robinson, A. Roman Imperial Coins in the Hunter Coin Cabinet. II. Trajan to Commodus (London, 1971).
Szaivert, W. Die Mnzprgung der Kaiser Marcus Aurelius, Lucius Verus un Commodus (161-192). (Wien, 1984).
Seaby, H. & R. Loosley. Roman Silver Coins, Vol. II: Tiberius to Commodus. (London, 1979).
Sear, D. Roman Coins and Their Values, Vol. II: The Accession of Nerva to the Overthrow of the Severan Dynasty AD 96 - AD 235. (London, 2002).
Toynbee, J.M.C. Roman medallions. ANSNS 5. (New York, 1944).
Vagi, D. Coinage and History of the Roman Empire. (Sidney, 1999).

Catalog current as of Saturday, June 15, 2019.
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Roman Coins of Crispina