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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Roman Coins ▸ The Adoptive Emperors ▸ CrispinaView Options:  |  |  | 

Crispina, wife of Commodus, Augusta 178 - 182 A.D.

Crispina was married to emperor Commodus in 177A.D., in an effort to foster some virtue in the young Caesar. Unfortunately, Crispina was a vain and haughty, if beautiful, and did little to improve Commodus' character. She was implicated in a plot to kill Commodus in 182. She was exiled to Capri with Lucilla and murdered soon after.


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Venus (Aphrodite) can be faulted for the Trojan War. Upset that she was not invited to a wedding, she went anyway and maliciously left a golden apple inscribed "For the fairest" on the banquet table. The goddesses, as Aphrodite expected, argued who was the rightful possessor of this prize. It was determined the most handsome mortal in the world, a noble Trojan youth named Paris, would decide. Each of the three finalists offered Paris a bribe. Hera promised he would rule the world. Athena said she would make him victorious in battle. Aphrodite guaranteed the love of the most beautiful woman in the world. This was Helen, who was married to the king of Sparta. Paris awarded the golden apple to Aphrodite. Aphrodite enabled Paris to elope with Helen, Helen of Troy. Helen's husband raised a Greek army to retrieve his wife, starting the Trojan War.
RS72344. Silver denarius, RIC III 286a (S), RSC II 35, BMCRE IV 44, Hunter II 12, SRCV II 6002, F, nice portrait, bold obverse legend, scratches, weight 2.993 g, maximum diameter 18.8 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 180 - 182 A.D.; obverse CRISPINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right, hair in round coil at back; reverse VENVS, Venus standing slightly left, raising apple in right hand, gathering up drapery on left shoulder with left hand; scarce; $90.00 (78.30)


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This type invokes the Gods of Childbirth, however, there is no record of the offspring from Commodus and Crispina.
RS06925. Silver denarius, RIC III 281, RSC II 15, EF, weight 3.31 g, maximum diameter 18.4 mm, die axis 320o, Rome mint, 180 - 182 A.D.; obverse CRISPINA AVG, draped bust right; reverse DIS GENITALIBVS, square altar or altar enclosure; rare; SOLD


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RS33550. Silver denarius, RIC III 279, RSC II 9, BMCRE IV 29, Choice gVF, weight 3.403 g, maximum diameter 19.3 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 180 - 182 A.D.; obverse CRISPINA AVG, draped bust right; reverse CONCORDIA, clasped hands; scarce; SOLD







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OBVERSE LEGENDS

CRISPINAAVG
CRISPINAAVGIMPCOMMODIAVG
CRISPINAAVGVSTA


REFERENCES

Banti, A. and L. Simonetti. Corpus Nummorum Romanorum. (Florence, 1972-1979).
Calic, E.X. The Roman Avrei, Vol. I: From the Republic to Pertinax, 196 BC - 193 AD. (Barcelona, 2003).
Cohen, H. Description historique des monnaies frappes sous l'Empire Romain, Vol. III: Vol. 3: Marcus Aurelius to Clodius Albinus. (Paris, 1883).
Mattingly, H. & E. Sydenham. The Roman Imperial Coinage, Vol III: Antoninus Pius to Commodus. (London, 1930).
Mattingly, H. & R.A.G. Carson. Coins of the Roman Empire in the British Museum, Vol. 4: Antoninus Pius to Commodus. (London, 1940).
Robinson, A.S. Roman Imperial Coins in the Hunter Coin Cabinet. II. Trajan to Commodus (London, 1971).
Szaivert, W. Die Mnzprgung der Kaiser Marcus Aurelius, Lucius Verus un Commodus (161-192). (Wien, 1984).
Seaby, H.A. & R. Loosley. Roman Silver Coins, Vol. II: Tiberius to Commodus. (London, 1979).
Sear, D.R. Roman Coins and Their Values, Vol. II: The Accession of Nerva to the Overthrow of the Severan Dynasty AD 96 - AD 235. (London, 2002).
Toynbee, J.M.C. Roman medallions. ANSNS 5. (New York, 1944).
Vagi, D. Coinage and History of the Roman Empire. (Sidney, 1999).

Catalog current as of Thursday, July 30, 2015.
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Roman Coins of Crispina