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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Roman Coins ▸ The Adoptive Emperors ▸ Faustina Sr.View Options:  |  |  |   

Faustina Sr., Augusta 25 February 138 - early 141, wife of Antoninus Pius

Faustina I was the wife of Antoninus Pius. Little is known of her, except that she was regarded as vain and frivolous, though this may have just been malicious gossip. Antoninus Pius loved her greatly and, upon her death in 141 A.D., she was deified and a temple was built in her honor.


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Gold aurei are about the same size as silver denarii but they were not struck with the same dies. The finest work of the mint's top master engravers was reserved for striking gold. The difference between the artistry of the gold and silver is not always so striking, but no denarius equals the beauty of this coin.
SH33181. Gold aureus, SRCV II 4553 (same dies), Cayon 1765 (same), RIC III AP356d, Cohen II 98, BMCRE IV AP398, Choice EF, weight 6.923 g, maximum diameter 19.8 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 147 - 161 A.D.; obverse DIVA FAVSTINA, diademed, draped and veiled bust left; reverse AVGVSTA, Ceres standing left, torch in right hand, scepter in left hand; very light hairline scratches; ex Numismatik Lanz auction 135, lot 745 (misattributed); ex Goldberg Auction44, lot 3704 (ICG AU 50); hints of red toning, bold and beautiful, struck with elegant dies!; scarce; SOLD


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The Romans believed that Fortuna, after deserting the Persians and Assyrians, took flight over Macedonia and saw Alexander perish as she passed into Egypt and into Syria. At last arriving on Mount Palatine, she threw aside her wings and casting away her wheel, entered Rome where she took up her abode forever.
SH30326. Gold aureus, Calico 1746 (S3), RIC III 349b, BMCRE IV AP285, Cohen II 4, Choice EF, weight 7.253 g, maximum diameter 19.8 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, c. 141 A.D.; obverse DIVA AVG FAVSTINA, draped bust right; reverse AETERNITAS, Fortuna standing half left, patera in right, rudder on globe vertical in left; nice style, attractive portrait, well struck on a broad flan; ex Cayon Subastas auction 13 - 14 Dec 2007, lot 3304; a few minor hairline scratches; scarce; SOLD


Diva Faustina and Galerius Antoninus, c. 147 A.D.

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Galerius Antoninus was the second son of Antoninus Pius and Faustina, and he died young before his father's accession. This type is obviously a part of the massive commemorative issues struck by Antoninus after his wife died in 141. The mint is uncertain, traditionally being assigned to Cyprus, while Rome being another possibility based on the very fine style.
RP30703. Bronze provincial dupondius, SGICV 1540, Cohen II 1-2, VF, weight 11.418 g, maximum diameter 28.0 mm, die axis 0o, uncertain mint, c. 147 A.D.; obverse ΘEA ΦAYCTEINA, veiled and draped bust right; reverse M ΓAΛEPIOC ANTWNINOC AYTOKPATOPOC ANTWNINOY YIOC, draped bust of Galerius Antonius left; rare; SOLD


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Pietas in traditional Latin usage expressed a complex, highly valued Roman virtue; a man or woman with pietas respected his or her responsibilities to the gods, family, other people and entities (such as the state), and understood his or her place in society with respect to others.
RB28948. Orichalcum dupondius, RIC III AP1161 var. (obv. legend), SRCV II 4641 var. (same), aEF, weight 11.305 g, maximum diameter 25.3 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 147 - 161 A.D.; obverse DIVA AVG FAVSTINA, draped bust right, hair piled on top; reverse AETERNITAS S C, Pietas standing left by alter raising right hand and holding box of incense; some smoothing on reverse; rare; SOLD


Faustina Sr., Augusta 25 February 138 - Early 141, Wife of Antoninus Pius, Delphi, Phocis

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SH54320. Bronze AE 24, Svoronos Delphi 89 - 92, SNG Cop 160, RPC Online 4602, F, weight 7.811 g, maximum diameter 23.7 mm, die axis 180o, Phokis, Delphi mint, obverse ΘEA ΦAVCTEINA, draped bust right; reverse ΠYΘIA, agonistic table with laurel wreath, apples, vase, and crow, small items in lower railing; SOLD


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Providentia is the personification of the ability to foresee and to make provision for the future. This ability was considered essential for the emperor and providentia was among the embodiments of virtues that were part of the imperial cult. Cicero said that providentia, memoria (memory) and intellegentia (understanding) are the three main components of prudentia, the knowledge what is good or bad or neither.
RS05273. Silver denarius, RIC III AP351, RSC II 32, BMCRE IV AP373, SRCV II 4578, superb EF, weight 3.63 g, maximum diameter 18.4 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, posthumous, 147 - 161 A.D.; obverse DIVA FAVSTINA, draped bust right; reverse AETERNITAS, Providentia standing left holding globe, veil blown out behind head; SOLD


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Juno was the chief female divinity in the Roman pantheon. She was the wife of Jupiter and a member of the Capitoline Triad. She had many different aspects, such as Juno Moneta, Juno Sospita, and Juno Lucina, but here she is depicted as Juno Regina, "Juno the Queen." Juno is usually shown holding a patera, scepter or a statuette of Athena, and is often accompanied by a peacock.
RB13830. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC III AP1143, SRCV II 4629, aVF, weight 25.771 g, maximum diameter 33.6 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, posthumous, after 147 A.D.; obverse DIVA FAVSTINA, draped bust right; reverse IVNO S C, Juno standing left, patera in right hand, long scepter vertical in left hand; SOLD


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Ceres a goddess of agriculture, grain crops, fertility and motherly relationships, was listed among the Di Consentes, Rome's equivalent to the Twelve Olympians of Greek mythology. The Romans saw her as the counterpart of the Greek goddess Demeter, whose mythology was reinterpreted for Ceres in Roman art and literature.
RS21702. Silver denarius, RIC III AP360, BMCRE IV AP408, RSC II 78, SRCV II 4582, Choice EF, weight 3.321 g, maximum diameter 19.0 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, posthumous, 147 - 161 A.D.; obverse DIVA FAVSTINA, draped bust right; reverse AVGVSTA, Ceres standing half left, heads of grain downward in right hand, long torch vertical behind in left hand; SOLD


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Faustina I was the wife of Antoninus Pius. Little is known of her, except that she was regarded as vain and frivolous, though this may have just been malicious gossip. Antoninus Pius loved her greatly, and upon her death in 141 A.D., she was deified and a temple was built in her honor.
RB65382. Orichalcum sestertius, BMCRE IV AP1606, RIC III AP1104 var. (veiled bust), Cohen 19 var. (same), cf. SRCV II 4606 var. (DIVA FAVSTINA), VF, weight 24.562 g, maximum diameter 33.6 mm, die axis 315o, Rome mint, posthumous, c. 147 A.D.; obverse DIVAE FAVSTINAE, draped bust right, strings of pearls in hair and hair in elaborate bun on top; reverse AETERNITAS, Aeternitas seated left, Phoenix on globe in right hand, transverse scepter in left hand,S C (senatus consulto) in exergue; very rare; SOLD


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The pulvinar (plural pulvinaria) was a special couch used for displaying images of the gods, that they might receive offerings at ceremonies such as the lectisternium or supplicatio. In the famous lectisternium of 217 B.C., on orders of the Sibylline books, six pulvinaria were arranged, each for a divine male-female pair. By extension, pulvinar can also mean the shrine or platform housing several of these couches and their images. At the Circus Maximus, the couches and images of the gods were placed on an elevated pulvinar to "watch" the games.
RS01677. Silver denarius, RIC III AP353, RSC II 61, BMCRE IV AP384, SRCV II 4579, Choice EF, light toning, weight 3.63 g, maximum diameter 18.8 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, posthumous, 147 - 161 A.D.; obverse DIVA FAVSTINA, draped bust right; reverse AETERNITAS, pulvinar of Juno: draped throne, against which rests scepter; in front peacock; SOLD




  




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OBVERSE LEGENDS

DIVAAVGFAVSTINA
DIVAAVGVSTAFAVSTINA
DIVAEFAVSTINAE
DIVAFAVSTINA
DIVAIFAVSTINA FAVSTINAAVGANTONINIAVG
FAVSTINAAVGANTONINIAVGPIIPP
FAVSTINAAVGANTONINIAVGPP
FAVSTINAAVGVSTA


REFERENCES

Banti, A. & L. Simonetti. Corpus Nummorum Romanorum. (Florence, 1972-1979).
Calicó, E. The Roman Avrei, Vol. I: From the Republic to Pertinax, 196 BC - 193 AD. (Barcelona, 2003).
Cohen, H. Description historique des monnaies frappées sous l'Empire Romain, Vol. 2: Nerva to Antoninus Pius. (Paris, 1883).
Mattingly, H. & E. Sydenham. The Roman Imperial Coinage, Vol. II: Vespasian to Hadrian. (London, 1926).
Mattingly, H. & E. Sydenham. The Roman Imperial Coinage, Vol III: Antoninus Pius to Commodus. (London, 1930).
Mattingly, H. & R. Carson. Coins of the Roman Empire in the British Museum, Vol. 4: Antoninus Pius to Commodus. (London, 1940).
Robinson, A. Roman Imperial Coins in the Hunter Coin Cabinet. II. Trajan to Commodus (London, 1971).
Seaby, H. & R. Loosley. Roman Silver Coins, Vol. II: Tiberius to Commodus. (London, 1979).
Sear, D. Roman Coins and Their Values, Vol. II: The Accession of Nerva to the Overthrow of the Severan Dynasty AD 96 - AD 235. (London, 2002).
Strack, P. Untersuchungen zur römischen Reichsprägung des zweiten Jahrhunderts, Teil III: Die Reichsprägung zur Zeit Antoninus Pius. (Stuttgart, 1937).
Toynbee, J. Roman medallions. ANSNS 5. (New York, 1944).
Vagi, D. Coinage and History of the Roman Empire. (Sidney, 1999).

Catalog current as of Thursday, November 15, 2018.
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Roman Coins of Faustina Sr.