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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Roman Coins| ▸ |The Adoptive Emperors| ▸ |Antoninus Pius||View Options:  |  |  |   

Antoninus Pius, August 138 - 7 March 161 A.D.

Titus Aurelius Fulvius Boionius Arrius Antoninus was born around 86 A.D. to a distinguished family. After a typical senatorial career, he made a name for himself as proconsul of Asia. He was adopted as Emperor Hadrian's heir in February 138 A.D. and succeeded soon after. His reign was long and peaceful, a Golden Age of tranquility and prosperity. He died in 161 A.D., leaving Marcus Aurelius as his successor.


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Certificate of Authenticity issued by David R. Sear.

On the certificate, David Sear notes, "a scarce and attractive variant of the obverse type."
SH24852. Gold aureus, RIC III 233e, Calico 1530 (same obv die), Cohen II 314, aEF, weight 7.0221 g, maximum diameter 20.1 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 153 - 154 A.D.; obverse ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P XVII, laureate head left; reverse COS IIII, Antoninus Pius, togate, standing left, globe in extended right, scroll in left; superb obverse portrait, recognizable portrait on reverse, minor blemish on the second I on the reverse, ex Harlan Berk; scarce; SOLD


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Victory or Nike is seen with wings in most statues and paintings, with one of the most famous being the Winged Victory of Samothrace. Most other winged deities in the Greek pantheon had shed their wings by Classical times. Nike is the goddess of strength, speed, and victory. Nike was a very close acquaintance of Athena and is thought to have stood in Athena's outstretched hand in the statue of Athena located in the Parthenon. Victory or Nike is also one of the most commonly portrayed figures on Greek and Roman coins.
SH30323. Gold aureus, RIC III 281c, Calico 1680, Cohen II 1032, BMCRE IV 912 var. (laureate head right), Choice aEF, weight 7.197 g, maximum diameter 18.6 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 157 - 158 A.D.; obverse ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P IMP II, laureate and draped bust left; reverse COS IIII, Victory walking left, extending wreath in right hand, palm frond in left hand; superb high-relief bust, well centered, great style; rare; SOLD


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Certificate of Authenticity issued by David R. Sear.

A rare and interesting type. LIBERALITAS coins commemorate largesses, distributions of money to the people of Rome, usually made upon important events or the return of the emperor after a longer absence. This coin commemorates Antoninus' seventh Liberalitas, perhaps on the occasion of the birth of a son to Marcus and Faustina in 152.

RIC only lists a draped and cuirassed bust obverse, and describes the reverse as Liberalitas holding an account board and a rod. The description must be based on a poorly preserved specimen, as our coin (and others) clearly show a male holding a simple fasces (rods bundled with an axe as seen on the back of a U.S. dime). The other object should be regarded more as a banner, on which dots were painted equal to the number of aurei distributed to each citizen. Another theory suggests it is actually a wooden shovel, with shallow pits which was used to draw an exact number of coins from a chest. True or not, we think it would be great fun to shovel through thousands of aureii.
SH21931. Gold aureus, RIC III 229 var., Cohen II 520 var., Choice gVF, weight 7.276 g, maximum diameter 19.8 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 152 - 153 A.D.; obverse ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P XVI, laureate bust right, very slight drapery on left shoulder; reverse LIBERALITAS VII COS IIII, Lictor, standing facing, head left, wearing cap and chlamys, fasces (rods bundled with an axe) in right, tessera in left; nice style, full circle centering on both obverse and reverse; very rare; SOLD


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Excellent recognizable figure of Antoninus on the reverse!
SH46937. Gold aureus, SRCV II 4027, RIC III 256b, Cohen II 996, BMCRE IV 863, gVF, a few light marks, weight 7.259 g, maximum diameter 19.5 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 155 - 156 A.D.; obverse ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P IMP II, laureate head right; reverse TR POT XIX COS IIII, Antoninus, togate, standing left extending globe in right; SOLD


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Certificate of Authenticity issued by David R. Sear.

This interesting, but damaged, gold aureus, the highest denomination in circulation and the equivalent of 25 silver denarii, dates from the very end of AD 144. This is indicated by the inscription DES IIII which is a continuation of the obverse legend. It records the emperor's designation to a fourth consulship which was taken up on January 1st, AD 145, and was the final consulship held by Antoninus.
SH56304. Gold aureus, RIC III 119a (citing Numismatische Zeitschrift 1881, p. 183; BMCRE IV p. 72 * and note (citing Trau sale, lot 1435); Cohen -; Hill 615; SRCV II -, VF, cuts and edge marks, weight 7.456 g, maximum diameter 19.4 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, very end of 144 A.D.; obverse ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P COS III, laureate bust right, very slight drapery on left shoulder; reverse DES IIII, Jupiter seated left on a facing throne, thunderbolt in right, long scepter vertical in left; ex Ponterio & Associates, NYINC, 8-9 Jan 2010, sale 152, lot 5950; very rare; SOLD


Click for a larger photo
Certificate of Authenticity issued by David R. Sear.

This interesting, but damaged, gold aureus, the highest denomination in circulation and the equivalent of 25 silver denarii, dates from the very end of AD 144. This is indicated by the inscription DES IIII which is a continuation of the obverse legend. It records the emperor's designation to a fourth consulship which was taken up on January 1st, AD 145, and was the final consulship held by Antoninus.
SH59732. Gold aureus, RIC III 119a (citing Numismatische Zeitschrift 1881, p. 183; BMCRE IV p. 72 * and note (citing Trau sale, lot 1435); Hill Undated 615; Cohen -; SRCV I, VF, cuts and edge marks, weight 7.456 g, maximum diameter 19.4 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, very end of 144 A.D.; obverse ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P COS III, laureate bust right, very slight drapery on left shoulder; reverse DES IIII, Jupiter seated left on a facing throne, thunderbolt in right, long scepter vertical in left; ex Ponterio & Associates, NYINC, 8-9 Jan 2010, sale 152, lot 5950; very rare; SOLD


Diva Faustina and Galerius Antoninus, c. 147 A.D.

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Galerius Antoninus was the second son of Antoninus Pius and Faustina, and he died young before his father's accession. This type is obviously a part of the massive commemorative issues struck by Antoninus after his wife died in 141. The mint is uncertain, traditionally being assigned to Cyprus, while Rome being another possibility based on the very fine style.
RP30703. Bronze provincial dupondius, SGICV 1540, Cohen II 1-2, VF, weight 11.418 g, maximum diameter 28.0 mm, die axis 0o, uncertain mint, c. 147 A.D.; obverse ΘEA ΦAYCTEINA, veiled and draped bust right; reverse M ΓAΛEPIOC ANTWNINOC AYTOKPATOPOC ANTWNINOY YIOC, draped bust of Galerius Antonius left; rare; SOLD


Antoninus Pius, August 138 - 7 March 161 A.D., Roman Provincial Egypt, Zodiac Type - Jupiter in Sagittarius

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This coin is from the Zodiac series issued during year eight of the reign of Antoninus Pius, described by Emmett as "one of the more remarkable iconographic programs in the entire scope of Greek or Roman coinage. Jupiter is associated with luck and good fortune. According to alwaysastrology.com, those born with Jupiter in Sagittarius attract good luck as long as they are generous, tolerant and practice what they preach. If you would like to see if you were born with Jupiter in Sagittarius (or another sign), click here to visit alwaysastrology.com.
RP72129. Bronze drachm, cf. RPC Online IV 14873; Dattari 2972; Dattari-Savio Suppl. pl. 19, 148; Geissen 1502; Milne 1822; BMC Alexandria p. 128, 1087; Emmett 1692/8, aF, nice reverse, obverse rough, weight 20.668 g, maximum diameter 33.5 mm, die axis 315o, Alexandria mint, 29 Aug 144 - 28 Aug 145 A.D.; obverse AUT K T AIΛ A∆P ANTWNEINOC CEB EVC, laureate (and draped?) bust right; reverse Zodiac type - Jupiter in Sagittarius: laureate bust of Zeus (Jupiter) right above a centaur (Sagittarius) leaping right and drawing bow, a star above centaur's head, L H (year 8) below; last sale for this type on Coin Archives was in 2010; very rare; SOLD


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Honos was the god of chivalry, honor and military justice. He was usually depicted in art with a spear and a cornucopia. He was sometimes identified with Virtus.
SH68901. Bronze dupondius, RIC III 802, BMCRE IV 1738, Cohen II 415, SRCV II -, EF, beautiful green patina, well centered, weight 12.822 g, maximum diameter 25.8 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 145 - 147 A.D.; obverse ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P, radiate head right; reverse HONORI AVG COS IIII, Honos standing facing, head left, togate, branch in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, S - C (senatus consulto) flanking across field; a very attractive coin!; SOLD


Roman Egypt, Antinoopolites Nome(?), Portrait of Antinous, c. 137 - 138 A.D.(?)

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On 30 October 130 A.D., Hadrian founded the city of Antinoopolis on the very bank of the Nile river where Antinous drowned. It was the capital of a new nome, Antinoopolites. Perhaps the date on this coin is year eight of an era beginning with the founding of Antinoopolis.

The date on our coin is not clear but is probably L - H, which is the same as the referenced coins. The Geissen tessera is about half the size of our example. The Dattari coin is 21mm but there is no image in Dattari or Savio to verify if it is the same or similar to our tessera.
SH90378. Lead tessera, cf. Dattari 6445, Geissen 3579 (3.54g), Emmett 4357 (R5), Milne -, Blum -, SNG Milan -, SNG Cop -, aVF/F, rough, weight 6.888 g, maximum diameter 22.1 mm, die axis 0o, Antinoopolis (or Alexandria?) mint, c. 30 Oct 137 - 29 Oct 138 A.D.(?); obverse draped bust of Antinous right, wearing Hemhem crown, date (L - H?) across fields; reverse bust of Serapis right, Kalathos on head, date (L - H?) across fields; extremely rare; SOLD




  




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OBVERSE| LEGENDS|

ANTONINVSAVGPIVS
ANTONINVSAVGPIVSCOS
ANTONINVSAVGPIVSPP
ANTONINVSAVGPIVSPPCOSIII
ANTONINVSAVGPIVSPPCOSIIII
ANTONINVSAVGPIVSPPIMPII
ANTONINVSAVGPIVSPPTRP
ANTONINVSAVGPIVSPPTRPXI
ANTONINVSAVGPIVSPPTRPXII
ANTONINVSAVGPIVSPPTRPXIII
ANTONINVSAVGPIVSPPTRPXIIII
ANTONINVSAVGPIVSPPTRPXV
ANTONINVSAVGPIVSPPTRPXVI
ANTONINVSAVGPIVSPPTRPXVII
ANTONINVSAVGPIVSPPTRPXVIII
ANTONINVSAVGPIVSPPTRPXVIIII
ANTONINVSAVGPIVSPPTRPXX
ANTONINVSAVGPIVSPPTRPXXI
ANTONINVSAVGPIVSPPTRPXXII
ANTONINVSAVGPIVSPPTRPXXIII
ANTONINVSAVGPIVSPPTRPXXIIII
ANTONINVSAVGPIVSPPTRPCOSII
ANTONINVSAVGPIVSPPTRPCOSIII
ANTONINVSAVGPIVSPPTRPCOSIIII
ANTONINVSAVGPIVSPPTRPXI
ANTONINVSAVGPIVSPPTRPXII
ANTONINVSAVGPIVSPPTRPXIII
ANTONINVSAVGPIVSPPTRPXIIII
ANTONINVSAVGPIVSPPTRPXV
ANTONINVSAVGPIVSPPTRPXVI
ANTONINVSAVGPIVSPPTRPXVII
ANTONINVSAVGPIVSPPTRPXVIII
ANTONINVSAVGPIVSPPTRPXIX
ANTONINVSAVGPIVSPPTRPXX
ANTONINVSAVGPIVSPPTRPXXI
ANTONINVSAVGPIVSPPTRPXXII
ANTONINVSAVGPIVSPPTRPXXIII
ANTONINVSAVGPIVSPPTRPXXIIII
ANTONINVSAVGPPTRIXX
ANTONINVSFXII
ANTONINVSFXVI
ANTONINVSFXVII
ANTONINVSFXXII
IMPANTONINVSAVGCOS
IMPANTONINVSAVGVSTVS
IMPCAESAELANTONINVSAVG
IMPCAESAELIVSANTONINVSAVG
IMPCAESTAELANTONINVSAVGPIVSPP
IMPCAESTAELHADRANTONINVSAVGPIVSPP
IMPCAESTAELHADRIANTONINVSAVGPIVS
IMPCAESTAELHADRIANTONINVSAVGPIVSPP
IMPTAELCAESANTONINVS
IMPTAELCAESANTONINVSAVG
IMPTAELCAESARHADRANTONINVS
IMPTAELCAESHADRANTONINVS
IMPTAELCAESHADRIANTONINVS
IMPTAELIVSCAESARANTONINVS


REFERENCES|

Banti, A. & L. Simonetti. Corpus Nummorum Romanorum. (Florence, 1972-1979).
Calicó, E. The Roman Avrei, Vol. I: From the Republic to Pertinax, 196 BC - 193 AD. (Barcelona, 2003).
Cohen, H. Description historique des monnaies frappées sous l'Empire Romain, Vol. 2: Nerva to Antoninus Pius. (Paris, 1883).
Mattingly, H. & E. Sydenham. The Roman Imperial Coinage, Vol. II: Vespasian to Hadrian. (London, 1926). (Caesar under Hadrian)
Mattingly, H. & E. Sydenham. The Roman Imperial Coinage, Vol. III: Antoninus Pius to Commodus. (London, 1930).
Mattingly, H. & R. Carson. Coins of the Roman Empire in the British Museum, Vol. 4: Antoninus Pius to Commodus. (London, 1940).
Robinson, A. Roman Imperial Coins in the Hunter Coin Cabinet. II. Trajan to Commodus (London, 1971).
Seaby, H. & R. Loosley. Roman Silver Coins, Vol. II: Tiberius to Commodus. (London, 1979).
Sear, D. Roman Coins and Their Values, Vol. II: The Accession of Nerva to the Overthrow of the Severan Dynasty AD 96 - AD 235. (London, 2002).
Strack, P. Untersuchungen zur römischen Reichsprägung des zweiten Jahrhunderts, Teil III: Die Reichsprägung zur Zeit Antoninus Pius. (Stuttgart, 1937).
Toynbee, J. Roman medallions. ANSNS 5. (New York, 1944).
Vagi, D. Coinage and History of the Roman Empire. (Sidney, 1999).

Catalog current as of Saturday, October 19, 2019.
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Roman Coins of Antoninus Pius