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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Roman Coins| ▸ |The Adoptive Emperors| ▸ |Sabina||View Options:  |  |  | 

Sabina, Augusta 128 - c. 136 A.D., Wife of Hadrian

Vibia Sabina was the wife of Emperor Hadrian, and a grand-niece of Trajan. They had an unhappy marriage and no children. Although she accompanied Hadrian on his many travels, he ignored her and had numerous affairs with both men and women. Sabina had an affair with Suetonius, Hadrian's secretary, in 119. Sabina is said to have remarked that she had taken steps to see she never had children by Hadrian because they would "harm the human race." She may have once aborted a child of theirs. Sabina died in 136 or 137 A.D., perhaps of natural causes or perhaps poisoned by Hadrian.

Sabina, Augusta 128 - c. 136 A.D., Kibyra, Phrygia

|Other| |Phrygia|, |Sabina,| |Augusta| |128| |-| |c.| |136| |A.D.,| |Kibyra,| |Phrygia||AE| |18|
Kibyra (Cibyra) near the modern town of Gölhisar in south-west Turkey, was possibly originally settled by Lydians. The city was in the far south of Phrygia adjoining Lycia. It is uncertain whether the city was part of the Province of Asia or of Lycia in the early imperial period. According to Strabo, the Lydian language was still being spoken by a multicultural population in the 1st century B.C. Thus Kibyra was the last place where the Lydian culture, by then extinct in Lydia proper, persevered.
RP92640. Bronze AE 18, RPC Online III 2301 (3 spec.), SNG Leypold 1610, SNGvA -, BMC Phrygia -, aF, brassy surfaces with uneven partial toning, porosity, legends weak, weight 3.428 g, maximum diameter 17.8 mm, die axis 0o, Kibyra (near Golhisar, Turkey) mint, 128 - c. 136 A.D.; obverse CABEINA CEBACTH, diademed and draped bust right, hair coiled above double stephane; reverse KIBYPATΩM, Asclepius standing facing, head left, leaning on serpent-entwined staff; from the Errett Bishop Collection; very rare; $100.00 (€92.00)
 


Sabina, Augusta 128 - c. 136 A.D., Perinthos, Thrace

|Perinthus|, |Sabina,| |Augusta| |128| |-| |c.| |136| |A.D.,| |Perinthos,| |Thrace||AE| |20|
Perinthos, later called Heraclea and Marmara Eregli today, is 90 km west of Istanbul near a small pointed headland on the north shore of the Marmara Sea. It is said to have been a Samian colony, founded about 599 B.C. It is famous chiefly for its stubborn and successful resistance to Philip II of Macedon in 340 B.C.; at that time it seems to have been more important than Byzantium itself.
RP92875. Bronze AE 20, CN Online Perinthos CN_4717, Schonert Perinthos 380, Varbanov III 100 (R6), BMC Thrace -, SNG Cop -, VF, green patina, well centered on a tight flan, small edge splits, porosity, weight 5.147 g, maximum diameter 19.9 mm, die axis 0o, Heraclea Perinthos (Marmara Ereglisi, Turkey) mint, 128 - c. 136 A.D.; obverse CABINA - CEBACTH, draped bust right; reverse Π-EPIN-ΘIWN, Demeter standing left, two stalks of grain in right hand, long torch vertical behind in left hand; $90.00 (€82.80)
 


|Sabina|, |Sabina,| |Augusta| |128| |-| |c.| |136| |A.D.,| |Wife| |of| |Hadrian||denarius|
Ceres' known mythology is indistinguishable from Demeter's. Her virgin daughter Proserpina (Persephone) was abducted by Hades to be his wife in the underworld. Ceres searched for her endlessly lighting her way through the earth with torches. While Ceres (Demeter) searched, she was preoccupied with her loss and her grief. The seasons halted; living things ceased their growth, then began to die. Some say that in her anger she laid a curse on the world that caused plants to wither and die, and the land to become desolate. Faced with the extinction of all life on earth, Zeus sent his messenger Hermes to the underworld to bring Proserpina back. However, because she had eaten while in the underworld, Hades had a claim on her. Therefore, it was decreed that she would spend four months each year in the underworld. During these months Ceres grieves for her daughter's absence, withdrawing her gifts from the world, creating winter. Proserpina's return brings the spring.
SH54918. Silver denarius, RSC II 69a (R); Strack II 859; BMCRE III p. 356, - (*ref. Moushmov pl. 2, 13); RIC II Hadrian 409 var. (modius at feet); Hunter II -; SRCV II -, VF, superb portrait, light toining, weight 3.119 g, maximum diameter 18.9 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 128 A.D.; obverse SABINA AVGVSTA HADRIANI AVG P P, diademed and draped bust right, wearing stephane, hair in a plaited coil on crown of head; reverse Ceres seated left on basket, two stalks of grain and poppy in right hand, lit torch in left hand, S•C in exergue; extremely rare; SOLD







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OBVERSE| LEGENDS|

DIVAAVGSABINA
DIVAAVGVSTASABINA
SABINAAVGVSTA
SABINAAVGVSTAHADRIANIAVGPP


REFERENCES|

Banti, A. and L. Simonetti. Corpus Nummorum Romanorum. (Florence, 1972-1979).
Blum, G. "Numismatique D'Antinoos" in JIAN 16. (Athens, 1914). pp. 33 - 70.
Calicó, E.X. The Roman Avrei, Vol. I: From the Republic to Pertinax, 196 BC - 193 AD. (Barcelona, 2003).
Cohen, H. Description historique des monnaies frappées sous l'Empire Romain, Vol. 2: Nerva to Antoninus Pius. (Paris, 1883).
Hill, P.V. The Dating and Arrangement of the Undated Coins of Rome, A.D. 98-148. (London, 1970).
Mattingly H. & E. Sydenham. The Roman Imperial Coinage, Vol. II: Vespasian to Hadrian. (London, 1926).
Mattingly, H. & R.A.G. Carson. Coins of the Roman Empire in the British Museum, Vol. 3: Nerva to Hadrian. (London, 1936).
Robinson, A.S. Roman Imperial Coins in the Hunter Coin Cabinet. II. Trajan to Commodus (London, 1971).
Seaby, H.A. & R. Loosley. Roman Silver Coins, Vol. II: Tiberius to Commodus. (London, 1979).
Sear, D.R. Roman Coins and Their Values, Vol. II: The Accession of Nerva to the Overthrow of the Severan Dynasty AD 96 - AD 235. (London, 2002).
Toynbee, J.M.C. Roman medallions. ANSNS 5. (New York, 1944).
Vagi, D. Coinage and History of the Roman Empire. (Sidney, 1999).

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