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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Roman Coins ▸ The Adoptive Emperors ▸ HadrianView Options:  |  |  | 

Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D.

Hadrian, one of the "Five Good Emperors," abandoned the expansionist policy of Trajan and established a policy of defense and consolidation during which Hadrian's Wall in Britain was constructed. He traveled to nearly every province of the Empire, more than any other emperor, often ordering grandiose building programs to improve infrastructure and the quality of life in those regions. An ardent admirer of Greece, he sought to make Athens the cultural capital of the Empire and ordered the construction of many opulent temples in the city. He spent much of his time with the military; usually wore military attire and even dined and slept amongst the soldiers. He ordered military training and drilling to be more rigorous and made use of false reports of attack to keep the army alert. He suppressed the Bar Kokhba revolt in Judaea, renaming the province Syria Palaestina.Roman Empire 125 AD


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In 132, a messianic, charismatic Jewish leader Simon bar Kokhba started the Bar Kokhba revolt, a war of liberation for Judea against Rome. At first the rebellion was a success. The legion X Fretensis was forced to retreat from Jerusalem to Caesarea. The legion XXII Deiotariana, which advanced from Egypt, was destroyed. The Jews re-established their sacrifices and struck coins to celebrate their independence. The rebellion would last for only 30 months. By 135, the Romans had recaptured Jerusalem, Simon bar Kokhba was dead, and the majority of the Jewish population of Judea was either killed, exiled, or sold into slavery. Jerusalem was renamed Colonia Aelia Capitolina and an altar to Jupiter was erected on the site of the Temple. The Jews remained scattered without a homeland for close to two millennia.

SH73703. Copper as, BMCRE III 1459, RIC II 719(d), Cohen II 659, Hunter II 478 var. (draped), SRCV II -, Choice gVF, well centered, excellent portrait, green patina, areas of porosity, weight 10.412 g, maximum diameter 25.7 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 132 - 135 A.D.; obverse HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS, laureate head right; reverse FELICITATI AVG, war galley rowed left over waves, mast with furled sail on prow, five oarsmen, steersman under an arched shelter and apluster at stern, S - C flanking ship, COS III P P in exergue; ex Tom Cederlind; $630.00 (€560.70)
 


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In summer 130 A.D., Hadrian traveled from Syria, into Judaea and Palestine, and then on to Egypt. The bar-Kochba revolt in Judaea forced Hadrian to remain in the region until 135. In 136 A.D., Hadrian returned to Rome, ending his long travels.
SH72906. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC II 894 (R), Hendin 1604d, Cohen II 52, SRCV II 3566 var., Fair, weight 24.916 g, maximum diameter 31.5 mm, die axis 225o, Rome mint, c. 136 - 138 A.D.; obverse HADRIANVS AVG COS III P P, laureate and draped bust right; reverse ADVENTVI AVG IVDAEAE, Hadrian on left, standing right, togate, raising right hand, facing Judaea who holds a patera over altar in right and cup in left, two small children each holding a palm frond flank the altar, S C in exergue; rare; $575.00 (€511.75)
 


Roman Egypt, Nov 130 - c. 138 A.D.

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Both the obverse and reverse types on this tessera are published but the combination does not appear to be published. Nor did we find another example online. According to Milne, lead tesserae served as local small change in Egypt during the first to the third century A.D.
RX90574. Lead tessera, Unpublished; cf. Dattari 6444 and Geissen 3584 (for obverse type) and Dattari 6493 and 3575 (for reverse type), VF , weight 5.107 g, maximum diameter 22.5 mm, die axis 270o, Alexandria(?) mint, Nov 130 - c. 138 A.D. (possibly later); obverse Antinous on horseback right, wearing hem hem crown, caduceus in right hand; reverse Nilus reclining left on crocodile right below, nude to waist, himation around hips and legs, reeds in his right hand, cornucopia in left; before him at his feet stands Euthenia (prosperity) wearing chiton and peplos, offering wreath held in right hand; extremely rare; $480.00 (€427.20)
 


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Felix (Lucky) was a traditional epithet for Venus. Venus Felix was her cult title at Hadrian's temple to Venus Felix and Roma Aeterna on the Via Sacra. In dice-games, a popular pastime among Romans of all classes, the luckiest, best possible roll was known as "Venus."
SH76082. Silver denarius, RSC II 1449; BMCRE III 752; RIC II 280; SRCV II 3546, Hunter II 252 var. (palladium vice Cupid), EF, bold reverse with extraordinary style, toned, light marks, encrustations, tiny edge cracks, weight 3.276 g, maximum diameter 16.5 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 134 - 138 A.D.; obverse HADRIANVS AVG COS III P P, bare head right; reverse VENERIS FELICIS, Venus seated left on throne without back, feet on footstool, winged Cupid standing left in right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left; scarce; $400.00 (€356.00)
 


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Bizya, Thrace

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Bizya (or Bizye) was located between Hadrianopolis and Byzantion. The first Roman imperial coins struck at Bizya, were struck under Hadrian.
RP77130. Bronze AE 31, Jurukova Bizye, pl. 1, 3; 6 (same dies) 1A; Price-Trell p. 247, 83; Varbanov 1421 var., VF, well centered, green patina, weight 18.00 g, maximum diameter 30.6 mm, Bizya (Vize, Turkey) mint, magistrate Maec. Nepos, 117 - 119; obverse AYTO TPAIANOC A∆PIANOC KAICA-P CE / GEP B, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, Door with two; reverse EΠI MAI NEΠ ΠPECB KAI ANT, city gate arch, flanked by two columns and two round crenelated towers, quadriga galloping right above, BIZYH/NΩN in two lines in the exergue; ex Numismatik Lanz auction 160 (15 Jun 2010), lot 414; rare; $300.00 (€267.00)
 


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Hadrian traveled to nearly every province of the Empire and spent more than half his reign outside Italy. Nero had been criticized as self-indulgent for his trip to Greece, but Hadrian proudly advertised his travels with his "Adventus" coinage series. Unlike Nero, the pleasure-seeking tourist, Hadrian inspected and corrected the legions and made grants for the construction of new public buildings, projects and settlements. Hadrian travels were intended to transform conquered lands into a unified Roman Empire.
RS71591. Silver denarius, RIC II 301a, BMCRE III 829, RSC II 188, Hunter II 277, SRCV II 3462, VF, nice portrait, centered, toned, edge cracks, weight 3.299 g, maximum diameter 17.7 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, c. 131 - 138 A.D.; obverse HADRIANVS AVG COS III P P, bearded bare head right; reverse ASIA, Asia standing left, right foot on prow, hook in right hand, rudder flukes up in left hand; $300.00 (€267.00)
 


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D.

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In Greek mythology, the Amazons were a nation of all-female warriors. Herodotus placed them in a region bordering Scythia in Sarmatia (in modern Ukraine). Other historiographers placed them in Anatolia or in Libya.
RS77244. Silver denarius, RIC II 76a, RSC II 1108, BMCRE II 147, Strack II 122, Hunter II -, SRCV II -, VF, nice portrait, light bumps and marks, edge cracks, weight 3.271 g, maximum diameter 18.1 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 123 A.D.; obverse IMP CAESAR TRAIAN HADRIANVS AVG, laureate and draped bust right; reverse P M TR P COS III, Roma standing slightly left, head left, wearing crested helmet, dressed as Amazon in short tunic, Victory in right hand, vertical spear in left hand; $280.00 (€249.20)
 


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In 122, Hadrian gave up the conquered territories in Scotland. During a personal visit to the area, Hadrian ordered construction of a 73 mile (117-kilometer) long wall to mark the northern border and keep the Caledonians, Picts and other tribes at bay. Construction of Hadrian's Wall began on 13 September.
RS76083. Silver denarius, RSC II 1174a, BMCRE III 245, Strack II 105, RIC II 113b, SRCV II 3529 var. (draped and cuirassed), Hunter II 89 (draped), VF, nice bust and galley, toned, porous, weight 3.204 g, maximum diameter 17.9 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 122 A.D.; obverse IMP CAESAR TRAIAN HADRIANVS AVG, laureate bust right, slight drapery on far shoulder; reverse P M TR P COS III, galley rowed left, mast with furled sail in bow, rudder and cabin in stern; $250.00 (€222.50)
 


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Ceres' known mythology is indistinguishable from Demeter's. Her virgin daughter Proserpina (Persephone) was abducted by Hades to be his wife in the underworld. Ceres searched for her endlessly lighting her way through the earth with torches. While Ceres (Demeter) searched, she was preoccupied with her loss and her grief. The seasons halted; living things ceased their growth, then began to die. Some say that in her anger she laid a curse on the world that caused plants to wither and die, and the land to become desolate. Faced with the extinction of all life on earth, Zeus sent his messenger Hermes to the underworld to bring Proserpina back. However, because she had eaten while in the underworld, Hades had a claim on her. Therefore, it was decreed that she would spend four months each year in the underworld. During these months Ceres grieves for her daughter's absence, withdrawing her gifts from the world, creating winter. Proserpina's return brings the spring.
SH77274. Silver denarius, RSC II 69a (R); Strack II 859; BMCRE II p. 356, - (*ref. Moushmov pl. 2, 13); RIC II Hadrian 409 var. (modius at feet); Hunter II -; SRCV II -, F, dark toning, scratches, edge cracks, weight 3.172 g, maximum diameter 19.1 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 128 A.D.; obverse SABINA AVGVSTA HADRIANI AVG P P, diademed and draped bust right, wearing stephane, hair in a plaited coil on crown of head; reverse Ceres seated left on basket, two stalks of grain and poppy in right hand, lit torch in left hand, S•C in exergue; extremely rare; $250.00 (€222.50)
 


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Salus was the Roman goddess of health. She was Hygieia to the Greeks, who believed her to be the daughter of Aesculapius, the god of medicine and healing, and Epione, the goddess of soothing of pain. Her father Asclepius learned the secrets of keeping death at bay after observing one serpent bringing another healing herbs. Woman seeking fertility, the sick, and the injured slept in his temples in chambers where non-poisonous snakes were left to crawl on the floor and provide healing.
RS77389. Silver denarius, RIC II 137a, RSC II 1326, Strack II 80, BMCRE III 314, Hunter II 112, SRCV II 3539 var. (laureate, draped, and cuirassed), EF, superb portrait, fine style, light rose toning, light marks, slightly ragged flan, weight 3.473 g, maximum diameter 19.6 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, c. 123 A.D.; obverse IMP CAESAR TRAIAN HADRIANVS AVG, laureate and draped bust right; reverse P M TR P COS III, Salus seated left, feeding snake rising from altar with patera in right hand, resting left elbow on chair, SALVS AVG in exergue; $225.00 (€200.25)
 


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In 122, Hadrian gave up the conquered territories in Scotland. During a personal visit to the area, Hadrian ordered construction of a 73 mile (117-kilometer) long wall to mark the northern border and keep the Caledonians, Picts and other tribes at bay. Construction of Hadrian's Wall began on 13 September.
RS76191. Silver denarius, RSC II 1174a, BMCRE III 245, Strack II 105, RIC II 113b, SRCV II 3529 var. (draped and cuirassed), Hunter II 89 (draped), VF, centered, porous, scratches, light scrape on reverse, edge cracks, weight 3.195 g, maximum diameter 19.1 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 122 A.D.; obverse IMP CAESAR TRAIAN HADRIANVS AVG, laureate bust right, slight drapery on far shoulder; reverse P M TR P COS III, galley rowed left, mast with furled sail in bow, rudder and arched cabin in stern; $220.00 (€195.80)
 


Roman Egypt, Nov 130 - c. 138 A.D.

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Both the obverse and reverse types on this tessera are published but the combination does not appear to be published. Nor did we find another example online. According to Milne, lead tesserae served as local small change in Egypt during the first to the third century A.D.
RX74430. Lead tessera, Unpublished; cf. Dattari 6444 and Geissen 3584 (for obverse type), F, weight 3.300 g, maximum diameter 21.7 mm, die axis 180o, Alexandria(?) mint, Nov 130 - c. 138 A.D. (possibly later); obverse Antinous on horseback right, wearing hem hem crown, caduceus in right hand; reverse bust of Serapis(?) right, kalathos (?, on head), cornucopia on shoulder behind, snake entwined staff before; extremely rare; $180.00 (€160.20)
 


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References list this type as a quadrans but examples without patina appear to be orichalcum (brass) vice copper. The yellow metal indicates the type is a semis. This coin has a near black patina, which is more common on brass than on bronze or copper, and the few spots of bare metal do look to be brass.
RB77189. Orichalcum semis, RIC II 625, BMCRE III 1279, Strack II 579, Cohen 1167 (5 fr.), SRCV II 3704 (all list as quadrans), gVF, nice dark patina, weight 2.989 g, maximum diameter 18.7 mm, Rome mint, 120 - 123 A.D.; obverse IMP CAESAR TRAIAN HADRIANVS AVG, eagle standing half right, head turned left, wings open but not spread; reverse P M TR P COS III, horizontal thunderbolt, S C below; rare; $180.00 (€160.20)
 


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Spes was the Roman personification of Hope. In art Spes is normally depicted carrying flowers or a cornucopia, but on coins she is almost invariably depicted holding a flower in her extended right hand, and raising a fold of her dress with her left hand. She was also named "ultima dea" - for Hope is the last resort of men.
RS77391. Silver denarius, RIC II 181d, RSC II 390, BMCRE III 417, Hunter II 143, Strack II 177, SRCV II 3479, VF, well centered on broad flan, light toning, struck with a cracked obverse die, edge splits, weight 2.961 g, maximum diameter 20.3 mm, Rome mint, 125 - 128 A.D.; obverse HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS, laureate bust right, slight drapery on left shoulder; reverse COS III, Spes standing left, raising flower in right hand, lifting fold of drapery with left; $155.00 (€137.95)
 


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Roman Provincial Egypt

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RX76582. Billon tetradrachm, Geissen 1064; Kampmann-Ganschow 32.534; BMC Alexandria p. 77, 648; SNG Cop 371; Dattari 1436 var. (obv. legend); Milne 1354/1355, aVF/F, high relief portrait, well centered, grainy and porous, contact marks, light scrapes, weight 10.016 g, maximum diameter 24.7 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, 29 Aug 132 - 28 Aug 133 A.D.; obverse AYT KAIC TPAIAN A∆PIANC CEB, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse Nilus reclining left, himation over legs, crowned with lotus, reed in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, crocodile below, LIZ (year 17) upper left; $150.00 (€133.50)
 


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In 127, Hadrian, acting on the advice of his proconsul of Asia, Minucius Fundanus, established that Christians shall not be put to death without a trial.
RS77324. Silver denarius, RIC II 198d, RSC II 454, BMCRE III 453, Hunter II 164, SRCV II 3483, VF, nice portrait, toned, well centered, scratches and marks, edge split, weight 2.839 g, maximum diameter 18.3 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 125 - 128 A.D.; obverse HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS, laureate head right, slight drapery on left shoulder; reverse COS III, implements of the augurate and pontificate: simpulum (ladle), aspergillum (sprinkler), ewer (jug) and lituus (augural wand); $150.00 (€133.50)
 


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Venus (Aphrodite) can be faulted for the Trojan War. Upset that she was not invited to a wedding, she went anyway and maliciously left a golden apple inscribed "For the fairest" on the banquet table. The goddesses, as Aphrodite expected, argued who was the rightful possessor of this prize. It was determined the most handsome mortal in the world, a noble Trojan youth named Paris, would decide. Each of the three finalists offered Paris a bribe. Hera promised he would rule the world. Athena said she would make him victorious in battle. Aphrodite guaranteed the love of the most beautiful woman in the world. This was Helen, who was married to the king of Sparta. Paris awarded the golden apple to Aphrodite. Aphrodite enabled Paris to elope with Helen, Helen of Troy. Helen's husband raised a Greek army to retrieve his wife, starting the Trojan War.
RS77338. Silver denarius, RIC II Hadrian 396, RSC II 73, BMCRE III Hadrian 944, Strack II 380, Hunter II 16, SRCV II 3924, Nice aVF, attractive style, bold strike, toned, small edge cracks, weight 3.440 g, maximum diameter 18.3 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 128 - 137 A.D.; obverse SABINA AVGVSTA, diademed and draped bust right, hair waived into crest on top of diadem, knotted falling down neck; reverse VENERI GENETRICI, Venus standing half right, drawing up robe at shoulder with right hand, apple in left hand; $150.00 (€133.50)
 


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Caesarea Maritima, Samaria

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The destruction of Jerusalem in the First Jewish War made Caesarea, with a population above 125,000 and the hub of the road network, the economic and political hub of Palaestina. Caesarea was again the marshaling point for the Roman army during the reign of Hadrian for the Bar Kochba War, 132 - 136. Hadrian himself visited the city in 130 and again in 134. Hadrian, like Titus sixty-four years earlier, executed Jewish rebels in the city. By tradition, the condemned including Akiva, a leading Jewish sage and the rabbi who had greeted the rebel leader as the expected Messiah (Yer. Ta'anit, iv. 68d). By Hadrian's time Caesarea's outer harbor had deteriorated badly. The harbor had been wrecked by a tsunami in December 115. Tectonic activity had lowered the ocean floor and sunken parts of the breakwater were causing a hazard to shipping. Another earthquake struck in 132 when urban areas were again severely damaged. Much of the original city, including its celebrated harbor, had to be built anew by Hadrian and his successor Antoninus Pius. At its height the rebuilt city covered an urban area of nearly a thousand acres - almost five-times the size of Jerusalem. -- Kenneth Humphreys
JD77072. Bronze AE 13, Kadman Caesarea 30 (same dies?); Rosenberger 28; Sofaer 33; BMC Palestine p. 21, 76 - 77; SNG ANS 773 - 775; SNG Cop -, VF, well centered on a tight flan, dark near black patina, a little rough, weight 2.137 g, maximum diameter 12.9 mm, die axis 30o, Caesarea Maritima mint, 11 Aug 117 - 10 Jul 138 A.D.; obverse IM TRA HADRIANO CAE, laureate bust right; reverse lion walking right, snake right above, C I F A C (Colonia Prima Flavia Augusta Caesarea) below; from the J. Berlin Caesarea Collection, found in Caesarea Maritima; very rare; $125.00 (€111.25)
 


Roman Egypt, Nov 130 - c. 138 A.D.

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In a statue at the Vatican of Nilus and Euthenia (his wife, the spirit of prosperity) the 16 cubits of the ideal Nile flood are represented by 16 children, 15 of whom have emerged from a cornucopia and the last of which is still emerging. On coinage the number is reduced. Here, due to space limitations, we have only two.
RX90590. Lead tessera, Savio pl. 322, 6463 (plate does not match the Dattari description); otherwise apparently unpublished, aF, weight 4.526 g, maximum diameter 21.2 mm, die axis 45o, Alexandria(?) mint, probably Nov 132 - Nov 133 A.D.; obverse Antinous on horseback right, wearing hem hem crown, caduceus in right hand, Nike above flying left and crowning him; horse's right foreleg raised, L in right field above it, Γ below (year 3); reverse Nilus seated right on rocks, nude to the waist, himation around hips and legs, holding a cornucopia in his right hand, crocodile left on rocks below; Euthenia standing left before him, wearing a wreath of grain and uraeus, a chiton and peplos, crowning Nilus with a wreath, a child between them reaches to Nilus, child behind her reaches to Euthenia; extremely rare; $110.00 (€97.90)
 


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Roman Provincial Egypt

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The ancients did not agree on the attributes of Serapis. A passage in Tacitus affirms that many recognized in this god, Aesculapius, imputing healing to his intervention; some thought him identical with Osiris, the oldest deity of the Egyptians; others regarded him as Jupiter, possessing universal power; but by most he was believed to be the same as Pluto, the "gloomy" Dis Pater of the infernal regions. On this coin, Pluto's influence is evident with the fearsome Kerberos at Serapis' feet.
RX76581. Billon tetradrachm, Kampmann 32.571, Geissen 1094, Dattari 1479, Milne 1399, Emmett 892, BMC Alexandria 623, SRCV II 6739 var. (date), aF, well centered, grainy and porous, weight 10.343 g, maximum diameter 13.74 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, 29 Aug 133 - 28 Aug 134 A.D.; obverse AYT KAIC TPAIAN A∆PIANOC CEB, laureate and draped bust right, from behind; reverse Serapis seated left, reaching with right to Cerberus at feet left, long scepter vertical in right, LI - H (regnal year 18) across fields; $110.00 (€97.90)
 


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Curtis Clay convincingly argues that Hadrian's "travel" coins naming provinces, including those having him arrive in a province, with "ADVENTVS" legends, restoring a province, with "RESTITVTORI" legends, and those having him address a provincial army, with "EXERCITVS" legends, were actually issued beginning soon after his safe return to Rome from his second journey in 131 A.D. Most references date them after 134 A.D.
RB76897. Orichalcum as (or dupondius), BMCRE III 1796, RIC II 942 (R), Cohen II 1227, SRCV II -, aVF, rough and porous, weight 11.105 g, maximum diameter 26.2 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 131 - 138 A.D.; obverse HADRIANVS AVG COS III P P, laureate bust right, from behind; reverse RESTTVTORI AFRICAE, Hadrian standing left, togate, holding volumen and extending hand to raise up kneeling Africa, wearing elephant skin headdress and holding two grain ears; three stalks of grain growing between them, S C in exergue; ex Morton & Eden auction 59 (13 - 14 Nov 2012), part of lot 957; ex Kenneth Edwin Day Collection; rare; $100.00 (€89.00)
 


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Roman Provincial Egypt

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The Lighthouse of Alexandria, also called the Pharos, built by the Ptolemaic Kingdom between 280 and 247 B.C., was one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World. Between 393 and 450 feet (120 - 140 m) tall, it was one of the tallest man-made structures on Earth for many centuries. Damaged by three earthquakes between 956 and 1323, it then became an abandoned ruin. It was the third longest surviving ancient wonder (after the Mausoleum at Halicarnassus and the still extant Great Pyramid of Giza), until in 1480 the last of its remnant stones were used to build the Citadel of Qaitbay on the site. In 1994, French archaeologists discovered some remains of the lighthouse on the floor of Alexandria's Eastern Harbor.
RX77843. Bronze drachm, Dattari 1768; Geissen 1121; Milne 1416; Kampmann 32.588; SNG Cop 386; BMC Alexandria p. 89, 757; Emmett 1002, F, pierced through center, weight 21.460 g, maximum diameter 33.0 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, 29 Aug 133 - 28 Aug 134 A.D.; obverse AYT KAIC TPAIAN A∆PIANOC CEB, laureate and draped bust right; reverse Isis Pharia right holding a billowing sail with both hands and left foot, sailing toward the Pharos, which is surmounted by a statue and two Tritons, each blowing a buccinum (sea shell trumpet); L IH (year 18) above center; $100.00 (€89.00)
 


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D. Struck at Rome for Use in Syria

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In 125 A.D., the Pantheon was constructed in Rome as it stands today.
RP65923. Orichalcum as, McAlee 551, SRCV II 3695, RIC II 666 corr., VF, cleaning scratches, weight 7.465 g, maximum diameter 23.8 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 125 - 128 A.D.; obverse HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS, laureate and draped bust right, from behind; reverse COS III, Roma seated left on cuirass, right foot drawn back and resting on helmet, Victory in right, long scepter vertical behind in left, round shield behind cuirass, S C in exergue; rare; $85.00 (€75.65)
 


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Roman Provincial Egypt

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Athena was the Greek goddess of wisdom, war, the arts, industry, justice and skill. Her usual attribute is the owl and Nike is her frequent companion.
RX74287. Bronze drachm, Dattari 1632; Geissen 1009; Kampmann-Ganschow 32.481; Milne 1286; BMC Alexandria p. 82, 689; Emmett 925.14, aF, edge splits, weight 26.721 g, maximum diameter 35.3 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, 129 - 130 A.D.; obverse AVT KAI TPAINOC A∆PIANOC CEB, laureate and draped bust right; reverse Athena standing left, wearing crested helmet, chiton, diplois, and aegis, Nike offering wreath in Athena's extended right hand, resting her left hand on shield, date LI-∆ (year 14) across field; big 35 mm bronze!; $80.00 (€71.20)
 


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Elaea, Aiolis

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Elaea was the ancient port of Pergamum, located near the modern town of Zeytindag, Izmir Province, Turkey. The name of Elaea occurs in the history of the kings of Pergamum. According to Strabo, from Livy (xxxv. 13), travelers who would reach Pergamum from the sea, would land at Elaea. One of the passages of Livy shows that there was a small hill near Elaea, and that the town was in a plain and walled. Elaea was damaged by an earthquake in the reign of Trajan, at the same time that Pitane suffered. The ruins of the silted port's breakwater can be seen on satellite photos.
GB77997. Bronze AE 16, BMC Troas p. 129, 42; SNGvA 1611; SNG München 424, SNG Cop -, aVF, nice dark green patina, weight 3.197 g, maximum diameter 15.8 mm, die axis 0o, Elaea (near Zeytindag, Turkey) mint, 11 Aug 117 - 10 Jul 138 A.D.; obverse AVTO - TPAI A∆P, laureate head and draped bust right; reverse EΛA/ITΩN, basket containing two poppy-heads in center, flanked on each side by two dropping stalks of grain; from the Butte College Foundation, ex Lindgren; rare; $80.00 (€71.20)
 


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Roman Provincial Egypt

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The Greek numeral sixteen (Iς) above Nilus refers to what was considered the ideal height of the annual Nile flood, sixteen cubits. Less could mean drought or famine. Even in modern times grand celebrations were held when the flood reached 16 cubits. In years when the flood failed to reach 16 cubits, the celebrations were canceled, and prayers and fasting were held instead. The peak flood occurred at the end of August, which explains why the Egyptian year began on 29 August.
RX74299. Bronze drachm, Geissen 1001; Dattari 1808; Milne 1276; SNG Cop 350; BMC Alexandria p. 92, 785; Kampmann-Ganschow 32.470; Emmett 1014, aF, edge split, weight 24.92 g, maximum diameter 35.8 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, 29 Aug 128 - 28 Aug 129; obverse AVT KAIC TPAI A∆PIA CEB, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, wearing aegis, from behind; reverse Nilus reclining left on a crocodile right, himation around waist and legs, cornucopia in right from which an infant genius emerges, reed in left, Iς above, L TPICKAI (year 13) in exergue; big 36 mm bronze!; $70.00 (€62.30)
 


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In 127, Hadrian returned to Rome after a seven year journey visiting the Roman provinces.
RS70333. Silver denarius, RIC II 184, RSC II 361b, BMCRE III 428, Hunter II -, SRCV II -, F, toned, edge cracks, weight 3.189 g, maximum diameter 18.9 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 125 - 128 A.D.; obverse HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS, laureate bust right, slight drapery on left shoulder; reverse COS III, Victory seated left, wreath in right hand, palm frond in left, globe in exergue; $70.00 (€62.30)
 


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Samosata, Commagene, Syria

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Samosata, meaning "sun," was an ancient city whose ruins existed at the modern city of Samsat, Adiyaman Province, Turkey until the site was flooded by the Atatürk Dam. -- wikipedia.org
RY78039. Bronze AE 21, RPC III 3417; SNG Cop 17; SNG München 375; BMC Galatia p. 118, 20; Butcher 8; SGICV 1235, F, well centered, porous, weight 4.573 g, maximum diameter 20.8 mm, die axis 180o, Samosata mint, 132 - 133 A.D.; obverse A∆PIANOC CEBAΣTOC, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse ΦΛA / CAMO / MHTPO / KOM, inscription in four lines within oak wreath; from the Butte College Foundation, ex Lindgren; $60.00 (€53.40)
 


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The Romans believed that Fortuna, after deserting the Persians and Assyrians, took flight over Macedonia and saw Alexander perish as she passed into Egypt and into Syria. At last arriving on Mount Palatine she threw aside her wings and casting away her wheel, entered Rome where she took up her abode forever. Fortuna distributed good and evil among mankind according to her caprice and without any regard to merit.
RB78066. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC II 760, Hunter II 528, BMCRE III 1512, Cohen II 772, SRCV II 3600, F, well centered, weak legends, corrosion, weight 24.416 g, maximum diameter 32.1 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 134 - 138 A.D.; obverse HADRIANVS AVG COS III P P, laureate and draped bust head right; reverse FORTVNA AVG, Fortuna-Concordia standing left, patera in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, S - C flanking across field below center; from the Butte College Foundation, ex Lindgren; $50.00 (€44.50)
 


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Pax, regarded by the ancients as a goddess, was worshipped not only at Rome but also at Athens. Her altar could not be stained with blood. Claudius began the construction of a magnificent temple to her honor, which Vespasian finished, in the Via Sacra. The attributes of Peace are the hasta pura, the olive branch, the cornucopia, and often the caduceus. Sometimes she is represented setting fire to a pile of arms.
RB77883. Copper as, RIC II 616(b), Hunter II 374, Cohen II 1141 var. (no drapery), BMCRE III 1265 (same), SRCV II -, F, light corrosion, porous, weight 8.930 g, maximum diameter 25.6 mm, Rome mint, 121 A.D.; obverse IMP CAESAR TRAIAN HADRIANVS AVG, laureate bust right, drapery on left shoulder; reverse P M TR P COS III, Pax standing left, olive-branch in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, S - C flanking low across field; from the Butte College Foundation, ex Lindgren; $34.00 (€30.26)
 







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OBVERSE LEGENDS

AVGVSTVSHADRIANVS
AVGVSTVSHADRIANVSPP
DIVVSHADRIANVSAVG
HADRIANVSAVGCOSIIIPP
HADRIANVSAVGVST
HADRIANVSAVGVSTVS
HADRIANVSAVGVSTVSPP
IMPCAEDITRAIANFDIVNERNEPTRAHADRIANOAVG
IMPCAEDIRAPARFDIVINERNEPTRAHADRIANOAVG
IMPCAESARTRAIAHADRIANVSAVG
IMPCAESARTRAIANHADRIANVSAVG
IMPCAESARTRAIANVSHADRIANVSAVG
IMPCAESARTRAIANVSHADRIANVSAVGPMTRPCOSIII
IMPCAESHADRIANDIVINERTRAIANOPTFIL
IMPCAESTRAHADRIANOAVGPP
IMPCAESTRAIANHADRIANOAVGDIVITRA
IMPCAESTRAIANHADRIANOAVGDIVITRAPARTHF
IMPCAESTRAIANHADRIANOPTAVGGERDAC
IMPCAESTRAIANHADRIANOOPTAVGGERDAC


REFERENCES

Banti, A. & L. Simonetti. Corpus Nummorum Romanorum. (Florence, 1972-1979).
Blum, G. "Numismatique D'Antinoos" in JIAN 16. (Athens, 1914). pp. 33 - 70.
Calicó, E.X. The Roman Avrei, Vol. I: From the Republic to Pertinax, 196 BC - 193 AD. (Barcelona, 2003).
Cohen, H. Description historique des monnaies frappées sous l'Empire Romain, Vol. 2: Nerva to Antoninus Pius. (Paris, 1883).
Hill, P.V. The Dating and Arrangement of the Undated Coins of Rome, A.D. 98-148. (London, 1970).
Mattingly H. & E. Sydenham. The Roman Imperial Coinage, Vol. II: Vespasian to Hadrian. (London, 1926).
Mattingly, H. & R.A.G. Carson. Coins of the Roman Empire in the British Museum, Vol. 3: Nerva to Hadrian. (London, 1936).
McAlee, R. The Coins of Roman Antioch. (Lancaster, PA, 2007).
Robinson, A.S. Roman Imperial Coins in the Hunter Coin Cabinet. II. Trajan to Commodus (London, 1971).
Seaby, H.A. & R. Loosley. Roman Silver Coins, Vol. II: Tiberius to Commodus. (London, 1979).
Sear, D.R. Roman Coins and Their Values, Vol. II: The Accession of Nerva to the Overthrow of the Severan Dynasty AD 96 - AD 235. (London, 2002).
Strack, P.L. Untersuchungen zur römischen Reichsprägung des zweiten Jahrhunderts, Teil II: Die Reichsprägung zur Zeit des Hadrian. (Stuttgart, 1933).
Toynbee, J.M.C. Roman medallions. ANSNS 5. (New York, 1944).
Vagi, D. Coinage and History of the Roman Empire. (Sidney, 1999).

Catalog current as of Wednesday, June 29, 2016.
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Roman Coins of Hadrian