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Home>Catalog>RomanCoins>TheAdoptiveEmperors>Hadrian

Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D.

Hadrian, one of the “Five Good Emperors,” abandoned the expansionist policy of Trajan and established a policy of defense and consolidation during which Hadrian's Wall in Britain was constructed. He traveled to nearly every province of the Empire, more than any other emperor, often ordering grandiose building programs to improve infrastructure and the quality of life in those regions. An ardent admirer of Greece, he sought to make Athens the cultural capital of the Empire and ordered the construction of many opulent temples in the city. He spent much of his time with the military; usually wore military attire and even dined and slept amongst the soldiers. He ordered military training and drilling to be more rigorous and made use of false reports of attack to keep the army alert. He suppressed the Bar Kokhba revolt in Judaea, renaming the province Syria Palaestina.Roman Empire 125 AD


Roman Egypt, Antinoopolites Nome(?), Portrait of Antinous, c. 137 - 138 A.D.(?)
Click for a larger photo On 30 October 130 A.D., Hadrian founded the city of Antinoopolis on the very bank of the Nile river where Antinous drowned. It was the capital of a new nome, Antinoopolites. Perhaps the date on this coin is year four of an era beginning with the founding of Antinoopolis.
SH90379. Lead tessera, cf. Geissen 3583, Dattari 2093, Emmett 4290 (R5), Milne -, SNG Cop -, SNG Milan -, aVF, weight 5.023 g, maximum diameter 21.7 mm, die axis 0o, Antinoopolis(?) mint, c. 30 Oct 133 - 29 Oct 134 A.D.(?); obverse draped bust of Antinous right, wearing lotus crown, crescent-nimbus before, Nike on globe behind crowning him; reverse bust of Horus right, draped and wearing the double crown of Egypt, date L - ∆(?) across fields; very rare; $750.00 (€562.50)

Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Roman Provincial Egypt
Click for a larger photo During Hadrian's reign Italian agriculture declined as imports from Egypt and North Africa depressed wheat prices, making it unprofitable to farm and forcing many farmers off the land. In Rome, bread was distributed free to the poor and Roman bakeries produced dozens of bread varieties.
RX59599. Bronze drachm, Milne 1038; Dattari 1802 var (date above); Kampmann-Ganschow 32.228; Emmett 1015 (R5), Geissen -, BMC Alexandria -, SNG Cop -, SNG Hunterian -, VF, weight 22.004 g, maximum diameter 33.6 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, 29 Aug 122 - 28 Aug 123 A.D.; obverse AVT KAIC TPAI A∆PIA CEB, laureate bust right, drapery on far shoulder; reverse Nilus reclining left, hippo under left arm, long reed in right, cornucopia in left, LZ (year 7) in exergue; extremely rare; $320.00 (€240.00)

Click for a larger photo Hadrian standing left on the Rostra in the Forum, addressing five citizens with hands raised in acclamation, temple behind with four visible columns, SC in exergue
RB57402. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC II 640, Cohen 416, BMCRE III 1309 note (refs Cohen), Fair, weight 22.9 g, maximum diameter 32.2 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 124 - 128 A.D.; obverse HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS, laureate head right; reverse COS III, Hadrian standing left on the Rostra in the Forum, addressing five citizens with hands raised in acclamation, temple behind with four visible columns (one to the left of Hadrian), S C in ex; very rare (R2); $300.00 (€225.00)

Click for a larger photo Fortuna Redux, one of the many aspects of Fortuna, was in charge of bringing people home safely, primarily from wars - redux means "coming back" or "returning." She may be one of the later aspects of Fortuna, as the earliest mention of her is of an altar dedicated by the Senate in 19 B.C. for the safe return of the Emperor Augustus.
SH90471. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC II 541a, BMCRE III 1110, Cohen 751, Cayon II 414 corr. (PART), SRCV II -, VF/F, superb bust, excellent centering, some corrosion, weight 22.695 g, maximum diameter 33.1 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, c. 117 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES DIVI TRA PARTH F DIVI NER NEP TRAIANO HADRIANO AVG, laureate and cuirassed bust right with drapery on left shoulder; reverse PONT MAX TR POT COS, Fortuna seated left, rudder held in right hand by tiller, cornucopia in left, FORT RED / S C in exergue; scarce; $300.00 (€225.00)

Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Roman Provincial Egypt
Click for a larger photo Shhhhh! quiet!...In Greek mythology, Harpocrates is the god of silence. Harpocrates was very popular in Egypt during the Ptolemaic and Roman Periods, as evidenced by his numerous terracotta household idols.
RX59024. Bronze diobol, Dattari 1718, VF, weight 8.372 g, maximum diameter 24.1 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, 29 Aug 133 - 28 Aug 134 A.D.; obverse AVT KAI TPAIAN A∆PIANOC CEB, laureate and draped bust right; reverse L IH (year 18), half-length bust of Harpokrates Heracleopolis, wearing Hemhem crown, finger to mouth, club behind; rare; $250.00 (€187.50)

Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Roman Provincial Egypt
Click for a larger photo The date on this coin is uncertain. It appears to have a date spelled out in the exergue and only a letter E seems clear. Savio 7956 also appears to have the date in the exergue. Again, the date is not clear.
SH90304. Bronze obol, cf. Savio 7956, Emmett 1159 (R5), Geissen -, Milne -, SNG Milan -, SNG Cop -, BMC Alexandria -, aVF, weight 3.703 g, maximum diameter 19.1 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, 29 Aug 126 - 28 Aug 127 A.D.; obverse AVT KAI - TRAI A∆PIA CEB, laureate head right; reverse griffin seated right, left forepaw on wheel, L ENDEKATOV (?, year 11) in ex; extremely rare; $250.00 (€187.50)

Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Caesarea Maritima, Samaria
Click for a larger photo The destruction of Jerusalem in the First Jewish War made Caesarea, with a population above 125,000 and the hub of the road network, the economic and political hub of Palaestina. Caesarea was again the marshalling point for the Roman army during the reign of Hadrian for the Bar Kochba War, 132 - 136. Hadrian himself visited the city in 130 and again in 134. Hadrian, like Titus sixty-four years earlier, executed Jewish rebels in the city. By tradition, the condemned including Akiva, a leading Jewish sage and the rabbi who had greeted the rebel leader as the expected Messiah (Yer. Ta'anit, iv. 68d). By Hadrian's time Caesarea's outer harbor had deteriorated badly. The harbor had been wrecked by a tsunami in December 115. Tectonic activity had lowered the ocean floor and sunken parts of the breakwater were causing a hazard to shipping. Another earthquake struck in 132 when urban areas were again severely damaged. Much of the original city, including its celebrated harbor, had to be built anew, by Hadrian and his successor Antoninus Pius. At its height the rebuilt city covered an urban area of nearly a thousand acres - almost five-times the size of Jerusalem. -- Kenneth Humphreys
SH90830. Bronze AE 14, Kadman Caesarea 30 - 31; Rosenberger 28; Sofaer 33; BMC Palestine p. 21, 76 - 77; SNG ANS 773 - 775; SNG Cop -, aVF, rough, weight 2.755 g, maximum diameter 14.1 mm, die axis 0o, Caesarea Maritima mint, obverse IM TRA HADRIANO CAE, laureate bust right; reverse lion walking right, snake right above, C I F A C (Colonia Prima Flavia Augusta Caesarea) below; from the J. Berlin Caesarea Collection; very rare; $250.00 (€187.50)

Click for a larger photo In 118 A.D., Rome had a population exceeding 1 million, making it the largest city in the world.
RS90479. Silver denarius, RSC II 749, BMCRE III 22, RIC II 10, Strack II 14, cf. SRCV 3493 (Cos II, etc.), Choice VF, excellent portrait, weight 3.213 g, maximum diameter 18.8 mm, die axis 225o, Rome mint, 117 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES TRAIAN HADRIANO AVG DIVI TRA, laureate bust right, draped left shoulder; reverse FORT RED in ex, PARTH F DIVI NER NEP P M TR P COS, Fortuna seated left, rudder held by tiller in right hand, cornucopia in left; ; $225.00 (€168.75)

Click for a larger photo Clementia was the goddess of forgiveness and mercy, which the Romans considered good traits for a caesar or emperor. In 44 B.C., a temple was consecrated to her by the Roman Senate, possibly at Julius Caesar's instigation. She was deified as a celebrated virtue of Julius Caesar, who was famed for his forbearance, especially following his civil war with Pompey from 49 B.C.
SH90477. Silver denarius, BMCRE III 538, RSC II 221, Strack II 333, RIC II 206, SRCV II 3464 var. (bust right), aVF, attractive portrait, toned, scratches, weight 2.562 g, maximum diameter 18.1 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 132 - 134 A.D.; obverse HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS, bare-headed, draped, bust left; reverse CLEMENTIA AVG COS III P P, Clementia standing half left, patera in right, long scepter vertical behind in left; rare with bust left; $195.00 (€146.25)

Click for a larger photo In 135, Simon bar Kokhba was killed in Betar, a fortress where he had taken refuge. Resistance continued in Galilee. The Jewish diaspora began as Emperor Hadrian barred Jews from Jerusalem and had survivors of the massacre dispersed across the Roman Empire. Many were sold into slavery. Jerusalem, largely destroyed, was renamed Colonia Aelia Capitolina. Legio VI Ferrata rebuilt the legionary fortress in the city and constructed a Roman temple at Golgotha. An altar to Jupiter was erected on the site of the Temple in Jerusalem.
RS71535. Silver denarius, RSC II 630, BMCRE III 616, RIC II 237, Strack II 222, SRCV I 3488 var (bare head), VF. centered, toned, light scratches, weight 3.212 g, maximum diameter 18.9 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 134 - 138 A.D.; obverse HADRIANVS AVG COS III P P, laureate head right; reverse FELICITAS AVG, Hadrian standing right, togate, roll in left, clasping right hands with Felicitas, standing left, caduceus transverse in left; $150.00 (€112.50)

Click for a larger photo The Romans used poppy for cooking and medicinal purposes. For cooking, it was used mainly as a garnish or sprinkled on bread, perhaps also in desserts. Pliny sites the medicinal purpose: '..allow the poppy sap to thicken, roll it into pastilles and allow these to dry in the shade. It is a tranquillizer, but if you take too much, you will die in your sleep.' (N.H. XX-lxxvi)
RS71544. Silver denarius, SRCV II 3461, RIC II 230, RSC II 170a, BMCRE III 600, VF, nice portrait, centered, toned, weight 3.403 g, maximum diameter 17.2 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 135 A.D.; obverse HADRIANVS AVG COS III P P, bare head right; reverse ANNONA AVG, modius with four stalks of grain and one poppy in center; $150.00 (€112.50)

Roman Empire, Anonymous, Domitian to Antoninus Pius, c. 81 - 161 A.D.
Click for a larger photo RIC identifies this type as common but it appears to be rare with the dove facing left.

Quadrantes, like quinarii, were issued only occasionally, perhaps exclusively for imperial distributions. Suetonius reported that, from the roof of the Basilica Julia "Caligula threw coins among the people." Perhaps this small coin was thrown to the crowd by the emperor himself at a similar event.
RB63623. Bronze quadrans, RIC II p. 218, 25, VF, weight 1.847 g, maximum diameter 14.4 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, c. 81 - 161 A.D.; obverse diademed and draped bust of Venus right; reverse dove standing left, S C in ex; rare; $145.00 (€108.75)

Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D. Struck at Rome for Use in Syria
Click for a larger photo In 125 A.D., the Pantheon was constructed in Rome as it stands today.
RP65923. Orichalcum as, McAlee 551, SRCV II 3695, RIC II 666 corr., VF, cleaning scratches, weight 7.465 g, maximum diameter 23.8 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 125 - 128 A.D.; obverse HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS, laureate and draped bust right, from behind; reverse COS III, Roma seated left on cuirass, right foot drawn back and resting on helmet, Victory in right, long scepter vertical behind in left, round shield behind cuirass, S C in exergue; rare; $135.00 (€101.25)

Click for a larger photo Hilaritas, the personification of rejoicing, is usually depicted as a matron, standing with a cornucopia in her left hand and a long palm frond on the ground in her right. Green branches were a sign of gladness and for special occasions, both public and private, it was the custom in ancient times to ornament streets, temples, gates, houses, and even entire cities, with branches and leaves of trees. This tradition carries on today in the form of wreaths and Christmas trees.
RS67688. Silver denarius, RSC II 816a , RIC II 126c, BMCRE III 280 (...TRAIAN - HADRIANVS...), SRCV II 3497, gF, weight 3.366 g, maximum diameter 20.0 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 119 - 122 A.D.; obverse IMP CAESAR TRAIA-N HADRIANVS AVG, laureate and draped bust right; reverse P M TR P - COS III, Hilaritas standing facing, raising veil from her face with both hands, HIL-AR P - R in two lines flanking across field; $120.00 (€90.00)

Click for a larger photo In 128, Hadrian's Wall was completed. Built mostly of stone in the east and with a wooden palisade in the west, it included at least 16 forts. About 15,000 legionaries constructed the wall; digging ditches, quarrying rock and cutting stone, preventing idleness which led to unrest and rebellions in the ranks.
RS90478. Silver denarius, RSC II 380, BMCRE III 385 488, RIC II 338, Choice aVF, well centered on a broad flan, weight 3.328 g, maximum diameter 20.2 mm, die axis 225o, Rome mint, 128 - 132 A.D.; obverse HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS P P, laureate head right; reverse COS III, Annona seated left, reaping hook in right, cornucopia in left, modius overflowing with stalks of grain at feet; $120.00 (€90.00)

Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Caesarea, Cappadocia
Click for a larger photo Kayseri, Turkey was originally named Mazaca. It was renamed Eusebia by Ariarathes V Eusebes, King of Cappadocia, 163 - 130 B.C. The last king of Cappadocia, King Archelaus, renamed it "Caesarea in Cappadocia" to honor Caesar Augustus upon his death in 14 A.D. Muslim Arabs slightly modified the name into Kaisariyah, which became Kayseri when the Seljuk Turks took control, c. 1080 A.D.
RP90613. Silver hemidrachm, Metcalf 86a; Sydenham Caesarea 255; BMC Galatia p. 62, 140; SNGvA 6413; SNG Cop 223 var (draped and cuirassed), gF, well centered, struck with worn dies, weight 1.560 g, maximum diameter 15.8 mm, die axis 0o, Cappadocia, Caesarea mint, 120 - 121 A.D.; obverse AYTO KAIC TPAI A∆PIANOC CEBACT, laureate bust right, slight drapery on far shoulder; reverse Victory advancing right, wreath in extended right, palm frond over shoulder in left, ET ∆ (year 4) in right field; ex CNG auction 326, part of lot 713; $120.00 (€90.00)

Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Struck at Rome for Use in Syria
Click for a larger photo An interesting type with Tyche of Antioch and the river-god Orontes, but struck at the Rome mint!
RP57016. Orichalcum as, McAlee 544a, RIC II 680 corr., SRCV II 3696, F, area of corrosion on rev, weight 8.502 g, maximum diameter 22.9 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 125 - 128 A.D.; obverse HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS, laureate and draped bust right, from behind; reverse COS III, Tyche seated left on rock, stalks of grain in right hand, resting left elbow on stork, river god swimming right at feet, S - C flanking across field; rare (R2); $110.00 (€82.50)

Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Chalcis ad Belum, Chalcidice, Syria
Click for a larger photo Trajan's last coinage struck at Chalcis ad Belum used the same reverse, also dated KE. The era of the city of Chalkis began in Autumn 92 A.D. Year 25 of the local era was Autumn 116 - Autumn 117 A.D. This reverse was used for Hadrian's coinage only for the short time after the mint learned he was the new emperor until the local New Year's day (29 August?). When the New Year began the date was changed to B referring to Hadrian's second regnal year (a new regnal year began on New Year's day, not the one year anniversary of rule).
RP69854. Bronze AE 22, Butcher 16; SNG Milan 6; SNG Hunterian 2712 var (drapery only on far shoulder); BMC Galatia -; SNG Mόnchen -; SNG Cop -; Lindgren -, F, weight 14.192 g, maximum diameter 22.3 mm, die axis 45o, Chalcis ad Belum (Qinnasrin, Syria) mint, c. 11 Aug - 28 Aug 117 A.D.; obverse AUTOKR KAIC TRAIANOC ADRIANOC CEB (or similar, laureate and draped bust right; reverse ΦΛ XAΛ/KI∆EΩN / KE in three lines (KE indicating year 25 of the era of Chalkis), all within laurel wreath of eight bunches of leaves, closed at the top with a pellet; from Butte College Foundation, ex Lindgren; very rare; $110.00 (€82.50)

Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Roman Provincial Egypt
Click for a larger photo  
RX90774. Bronze chalkous, Kampmann 32.455; Milne 1252; BMC Alexandria p. 105, 911-2; Dattari 1942; Geissen -, VF, weight 1.311 g, maximum diameter 11.1 mm, Alexandria mint, 29 Aug 126 - 28 Aug 127 A.D.; obverse no legend, laureate head right; reverse no legend, seven ray star, between rays L I A (year 11); ex Forum (2011); very rare; $100.00 (€75.00)

Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Roman Provincial Egypt
Click for a larger photo The Greek numeral sixteen (Iς) above Nilus refers to what was considered the ideal height of the annual Nile flood, sixteen cubits. Less could mean drought or famine. Much more could mean dangerous flooding. Herodotus gives 24 cubits as the highest recorded rise of the Nile. The lowest Nile on record before the river was dammed was about 13 cubits in 966 A.D.
RX69313. Bronze drachm, Geissen 990; Milne 1265; Dattari 1807 var; BMC Alexandria 783 var; SNG Cop 345 var; Kampmann-Ganschow 32.460, aF, weight 21.565 g, maximum diameter 34.1 mm, die axis 315o, Alexandria mint, 29 Aug 127 - 28 Aug 128 A.D.; obverse AVT KAIC - TRAI A∆PIA CEB, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse Nilus reclining left on a crocodile right, cornucopia in right, reed in left, himation around waist and legs, Iς above, L ∆W∆EK (year 12) in ex; big 34mm bronze!; $80.00 (€60.00)

Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Roman Provincial Egypt
Click for a larger photo In 127, Hadrian returned to Rome after a seven year voyage to the Roman provinces. Also in 127, acting on the advice of his proconsul of Asia, Minucius Fundanus, determined that Christians would not be put to death without a trial.
RX64521. Bronze obol, Dattari 1664; Geissen 956; Kampmann-Ganschow 32.342; Milne 1237a, Emmett 1150 (R3), BMC Alexandria 684, SNG Cop -, F, red patina, scratches, weight 5.025 g, maximum diameter 18.4 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, 29 Aug 126 - 28 Aug 127 A.D.; obverse AVT KAI TPAI A∆PIA CE, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse Demeter standing right, veiled and wreathed with grain, wearing chiton and peplos, long torch vertical behind in right, stalks of grain and poppies in left, L - IA (year 11) across field; scarce; $75.00 (€56.25)

Click for a larger photo There are peculiarities about these Roman crescent and star reverse types that are difficult to understand. First, the crescents are almost always depicted with the horns up. The moon is never seen this way in the sky. Also, in the sky stars are never visible within the horns of the crescent moon because there they would be behind the shadowed yet solid and opaque orb.
RS69963. Silver denarius, RSC 460a, BMCRE III 456, RIC II 200, SRCV II 3484 var (drapery), F, rough, coppery areas, weight 3.194 g, maximum diameter 19.3 mm, die axis 45o, Rome mint, late 125 - early 128 A.D.; obverse HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS, laureate head right; reverse COS III, star within and above crescent moon; $75.00 (€56.25)

Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Roman Provincial Egypt
Click for a larger photo The Greek numeral sixteen (IV) above Nilus refers to what was considered the ideal height of the annual Nile flood, sixteen cubits. Less could mean drought or famine and more could mean catastrophic flooding. Even in modern times grand celebrations were held when the flood reached 16 cubits. In years when the flood failed to reach 16 cubits, the celebrations were canceled, and prayers and fasting were held instead. The peak flood occurred at the end of August, which explains why the Egyptian year began on 29 August.
RX57429. Bronze drachm, Geissen 992 (same dies); BMC Alexandria p. 92, 786 cor (says elephant) and pl. XX (same reverse die); Milne 1267; Dattari 1805; SNG Cop 346, aF, weight 23.947 g, maximum diameter 34.5 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, 29 Aug 127 - 28 Aug 128 A.D.; obverse AVT KAIC TRA A∆PIA CEB, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse Nilus reclining left, cornucopia from which genius emerges in right, reed in left, hippopotamus under elbow, Iς above, L ∆W∆EK (regnal year 12) in ex; big 34.5 mm bronze!; $70.00 (€52.50)

Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Roman Provincial Egypt
Click for a larger photo The Greek numeral sixteen (Iς) above Nilus refers to what was considered the ideal height of the annual Nile flood, sixteen cubits. Less could mean drought or famine. Even in modern times grand celebrations were held when the flood reached 16 cubits. In years when the flood failed to reach 16 cubits, the celebrations were canceled, and prayers and fasting were held instead. The peak flood occurred at the end of August, which explains why the Egyptian year began on 29 August.
RX59672. Bronze drachm, Geissen 992; BMC Alexandria p. 92, 786 cor (says elephant); Milne 1267; Dattari 1805; SNG Cop 346; Kampman and Ganschow 32.462, aF, weight 25.972 g, maximum diameter 34.5 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, 29 Aug 127 - 28 Aug 128 A.D.; obverse AVT KAIC TRA A∆PIA CEB, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse Nilus reclining left, cornucopia from which genius emerges in right, reed in left, hippopotamus under elbow, Iς above, L ∆W∆EK (regnal year 12) in ex; big 34.5 mm bronze!; $70.00 (€52.50)

Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Roman Provincial Egypt
Click for a larger photo "Antinous was from Bithynium, a Bithynian city which we also call Claudiopolis, and he had become Hadrian's boy-favorite (paidika); and he died in Egypt, either by falling into the Nile, as Hadrian writes [lost], or, as the truth is, having been offered in sacrifice (hierourgethesis). For Hadrian was in any case, as I have said, very keen on the curious arts, and made use of divinations and incantations of all kinds. Thus Hadrian honoured Antinous - either on account of his love for him, or because the youth had voluntarily undertaken to die for him (ethelontes ethanatothe) (for there was need for a life to be surrendered willingly, to achieve what Hadrian intended), by founding a city on the spot where he suffered this fate and naming it after him [Antinoφpolis; modern El Sheik'ibada]. He also set up statues of him, or rather sacred images, practically all over the world. Finally he declared that he had seen a star, which he took to be that of Antinous, and gladly listened to the fictitious tales spun by his companions, to the effect that the star had really come into being from the soul of Antinous and had then appeared for the first time. As a result of this, indeed, he was ridiculed, especially because when his sister Paulina died he had not immediately accorded her any honours." -- Cassius Dio (c.164-post 229) (The section of his Roman History covering Hadrian's reign is known only from the 11th century epitome by Xiphilinus) 69.11.2-4
RX66487. Bronze obol, Geissen 1245; Dattari 1739; Milne 1575; Kampmann-Ganschow 32.772; SNG Hunterian 4129; BMC Alexandria p. 90, 764 var (no L), aF, weight 3.287 g, maximum diameter 18.7 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, 29 Aug 137 - 10 Jul 138 A.D.; obverse AYT KAIC TPA A∆PIANOC CEB, laureate bust right, drapery (and aegis?) on left shoulder; reverse bust of Harpokrates (perhaps Antinous as Harpokrates) right, wearing hemhem crown, slight drapery on far shoulder, pomegranate before, K/L - B (year 22) flanking across field; $65.00 (€48.75)

Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Roman Provincial Egypt
Click for a larger photo During Hadrian's reign Italian agriculture declined as imports from Egypt and North Africa depressed wheat prices, making it unprofitable to farm and forcing many farmers off the land. In Rome, bread was distributed free to the poor and Roman bakeries produced dozens of bread varieties.
RX57430. Bronze drachm, Milne 1357; Geissen 1068; Dattari 1627; SNG Cop 270; BMC Alexandria p. 82, 694, Fair, weight 19.816 g, maximum diameter 33.1 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, 29 Aug 132 - 28 Aug 133 A.D.; obverse AYT KAIC TPAIAN A∆PIANOC CEB, laureate and draped bust right, wearing aegis, from behind; reverse Athena standing left wearing crested helmet, two stalks of grain in right hand, resting left on grounded shield behind, L I-Z (year 17) across field; big 33mm bronze!; $55.00 (€41.25)

Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Tripolis, Phoenicia
Click for a larger photo Tripolis (Tripoli, Lebanon) was the center of a Phoenician confederation of Tyre, Sidon and Arados, hence the name Tripoli, meaning "triple city" in Greek.
RP65927. Bronze AE 24, Rouvier 1695; BMC Phoenicia p. 210, 48; SNG Cop 280; Baramki AUB 25; Lindgren 2349, aF, weight 10.025 g, maximum diameter 23.6 mm, die axis 0o, Tripolis mint, 116 - 117 A.D.; obverse AYTOKP KAICAP TPAIANOC A∆PIANOC, laureate bust right, slight drapery on far shoulder; reverse TPIΠOΛEITWN, jugate, laureate and draped busts of the Dioscuri right, each wearing pileus surmounted by star; $50.00 (€37.50)

Roman Empire, Domitian to Antoninus Pius, c. 81 - 161 A.D.
Click for a larger photo The affectionate dove, the bird of love, was sacred to the goddess Venus (Aphrodite). Doves were said to draw her heavenly chariot, and the Syrian Aphrodite Ashtarte was said to have been hatched from an egg nursed by doves. The phrase attributed to Jesus, "Be ye therefore wise as serpents, and harmless as doves" (Matthew 10.16), was no random metaphor but a traditional Syrian invocation.
RB66974. Bronze quadrans, RIC II p. 218, 24; Vagi 196; Cohen 10, F, rough, weight 2.136 g, maximum diameter 14.2 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, c. 81 - 161 A.D.; obverse diademed and draped bust of Venus right; reverse dove standing right, S - C flanking across field; $50.00 (€37.50)


Click for a larger photo In Roman mythology, Aequitas was the minor goddess of fair trade and honest merchants. Aequitas was also a personification of the virtues equity and fairness of the emperor (Aequitas Augusti).
RB69500. Copper as, RIC II 795(a), F, green patina, weight 10.708 g, maximum diameter 26.8 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 134 - 138 A.D.; obverse HADRIANVS AVG COS III P P, laureate head right; reverse AEQVITAS AVG, Aequitas standing left, scales in right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left; from the Butte College Foundation, ex Lindgren; $45.00 (€33.75)

Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Ancient Counterfeit
Click for a larger photo The makers of this counterfeit coin were certainly facing a huge risk. Perhaps they hoped depicting the emperor and the goddess of success would bring them luck.
RS70913. Fouree silver plated denarius, cf. RSC II 630, BMCRE III 616, RIC II 237, Strack II 222 (official, solid silver, Rome mint, 134 - 138 A.D.), aVF, well centered, most of the silver is gone, weight 2.426 g, maximum diameter 19.1 mm, die axis 225o, illegal mint, obverse HADRIANVS AVG COS III P P, laureate head right; reverse FELICITAS AVG, Hadrian, togate, standing right, clasping hands with Felicitas, standing left, holding caduceus; $45.00 (€33.75)

Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Antioch, Syria
Click for a larger photo In mid-117, Trajan, now a sick man, was slowly returning to Italy when he died in Selinus, Cilicia on 9 August. On his death bed, he made Hadrian his successor but rumor had it that Plotina and Matidia actually selected Hadrian after Trajan was dead. There was, however, no realistic rival to Hadrian. He was linked by blood and marriage to Trajan and commanded Rome's largest military force. Among Hadrian's first acts was to give up all of Trajan's eastern conquests. He then set out from Antioch to view the remains of Trajan, which were being escorted by Attianus, Plotina, and Matidia. He sent them on to Rome by ship and immediately returned to Antioch. He appointed Catilius Severus governor of Syria, and then left for Rome.
RP63932. Orichalcum semis, McAlee 539(c), BMC Galatia 289 ff. var (numeral-letter below S C), F, weight 4.108 g, maximum diameter 18.0 mm, die axis 180o, Antioch mint, obverse AYTOKP KAIC TPAIAN A∆PIANOC CEB, laureate head right; reverse large S•C, no numeral-letter, all within laurel wreath; extremely rare; $40.00 (€30.00)

Click for a larger photo Salus was the Roman goddess of health. She was Hygieia to the Greeks, who believed her to be the daughter of Aesculapius, the god of medicine and healing, and Epione, the goddess of soothing of pain. Her father Asclepius learned the secrets of keeping death at bay after observing one serpent bringing another healing herbs. Woman seeking fertility, the sick, and the injured slept in his temples in chambers where non-poisonous snakes were left to crawl on the floor and provide healing.
BB69304. Copper as, RIC II 678, F, pitting, corrosion, weight 9.636 g, maximum diameter 26.3 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 125 - 128 A.D.; obverse HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS, laureate head right; reverse SALVS AVGVSTI COS III, S - C, Salus standing left, feeding snake raising from altar; $36.00 (€27.00)

Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Roman Provincial Egypt
Click for a larger photo In 129, Hadrian continued his voyages, inspecting Caria, Cappadocia and Syria. In 130, he visited Petra and Gerasa (Jerash), and later Anatalya.
RX69664. Bronze hemidrachm, Geissen 1021, Dattari 1851, BMC Alexandria 723, Milne 1289, Kampmann-Ganschow 32.497, SNG Milan 1048 var (date arrangement), SNG Cop -, aF, weight 8.048 g, maximum diameter 23.8 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, 29 Aug 129 - 28 Aug 130 A.D.; obverse AVT KAIC TRAIAN A∆PIANOC CEB, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse Tyche standing left, rudder in right hand, cornucopia in left, date LI∆ left (year 14); from the Butte College Foundation, ex Lindgren; $34.00 (€25.50)


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Obverse legends:

AVGVSTVSHADRIANVS
AVGVSTVSHADRIANVSPP
DIVVSHADRIANVSAVG
HADRIANVSAVGCOSIIIPP
HADRIANVSAVGVST
HADRIANVSAVGVSTVS
HADRIANVSAVGVSTVSPP
IMPCAEDITRAIANFDIVNERNEPTRAHADRIANOAVG
IMPCAEDIRAPARFDIVINERNEPTRAHADRIANOAVG
IMPCAESARTRAIAHADRIANVSAVG
IMPCAESARTRAIANHADRIANVSAVG
IMPCAESARTRAIANVSHADRIANVSAVG
IMPCAESARTRAIANVSHADRIANVSAVGPMTRPCOSIII
IMPCAESHADRIANDIVINERTRAIANOPTFIL
IMPCAESTRAHADRIANOAVGPP
IMPCAESTRAIANHADRIANOAVGDIVITRA
IMPCAESTRAIANHADRIANOAVGDIVITRAPARTHF
IMPCAESTRAIANHADRIANOPTAVGGERDAC
IMPCAESTRAIANHADRIANOOPTAVGGERDAC




Average well preserved denarius weight 3.34 grams.

Catalog current as of Thursday, October 30, 2014.
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Roman Coins of Hadrian