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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Roman Coins ▸ The Adoptive Emperors ▸ HadrianView Options:  |  |  | 

Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D.

Hadrian, one of the "Five Good Emperors," abandoned the expansionist policy of Trajan and established a policy of defense and consolidation during which Hadrian's Wall in Britain was constructed. He traveled to nearly every province of the Empire, more than any other emperor, often ordering grandiose building programs to improve infrastructure and the quality of life in those regions. An ardent admirer of Greece, he sought to make Athens the cultural capital of the Empire and ordered the construction of many opulent temples in the city. He spent much of his time with the military; usually wore military attire and even dined and slept amongst the soldiers. He ordered military training and drilling to be more rigorous and made use of false reports of attack to keep the army alert. He suppressed the Bar Kokhba revolt in Judaea, renaming the province Syria Palaestina.Roman Empire 125 AD


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In summer 130 A.D., Hadrian traveled from Syria, into Judaea and Palestine, and then on to Egypt. The bar-Kochba revolt in Judaea forced Hadrian to remain in the region until 135. In 136 A.D., Hadrian returned to Rome, ending his long travels.
SH72906. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC II 894 (R); Hendin 1604d, Cohen II 52, SRCV II 3566 var, Fair, weight 24.916 g, maximum diameter 31.5 mm, die axis 225o, Rome mint, c. 136 - 138 A.D.; obverse HADRIANVS AVG COS III P P, laureate and draped bust right; reverse ADVENTVI AVG IVDAEAE, Hadrian on left, standing right, togate, raising right hand, facing Judaea who holds a patera over altar in right and cup in left, two small children each holding a palm frond flank the altar, S C in exergue; rare; $720.00 (626.40)


Roman Egypt, Nov 130 - c. 138 A.D.

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Both the obverse and reverse types on this tessera are published but the combination does not appear to be published. Nor did we find another example online. According to Milne, lead tesserae served as local small change in Egypt during the first to the third century A.D.
RX90574. Lead tessera, Unpublished; cf. Dattari 6444 and Geissen 3584 (for obverse type) and Dattari 6493 and 3575 (for reverse type), VF, weight 5.107 g, maximum diameter 22.5 mm, die axis 270o, Alexandria(?) mint, Nov 130 - c. 138 A.D. (possibly later); obverse Antinous on horseback right, wearing hem hem crown, caduceus in right hand; reverse Nilus reclining left on crocodile right below, nude to waist, himation around hips and legs, reeds in his right hand, cornucopia in left; before him at his feet stands Euthenia (prosperity) wearing chiton and peplos, offering wreath held in right hand; extremely rare; $540.00 (469.80)


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Hadrian traveled to nearly every province of the Empire and spent more than half his reign outside Italy. Nero had been criticized as self-indulgent for his trip to Greece, but Hadrian proudly advertised his travels with his "Adventus" coinage series. Unlike Nero, the pleasure-seeking tourist, Hadrian inspected and corrected the legions and made grants for the construction of new public buildings, projects and settlements. Hadrian travels were intended to transform conquered lands into a unified Roman Empire.
RS71589. Silver denarius, RIC II 301, BMCRE III 829, RSC II 188, SRCV II 3462, VF, weight 3.299 g, maximum diameter 17.7 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, c. 131 - 138 A.D.; obverse HADRIANVS AVG COS III P P, bearded bare head right; reverse ASIA, Asia standing left, right foot on prow, hook in right, rudder flukes up in right; $400.00 (348.00)


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Roman Provincial Egypt

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During Hadrian's reign Italian agriculture declined as imports from Egypt and North Africa depressed wheat prices, making it unprofitable to farm and forcing many farmers off the land. In Rome, bread was distributed free to the poor and Roman bakeries produced dozens of bread varieties.
RX59599. Bronze drachm, Milne 1038; Dattari 1802 var (date above); Kampmann-Ganschow 32.228; Emmett 1015 (R5), Geissen -, BMC Alexandria -, SNG Cop -, SNG Hunterian -, VF, weight 22.004 g, maximum diameter 33.6 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, 29 Aug 122 - 28 Aug 123 A.D.; obverse AVT KAIC TPAI A∆PIA CEB, laureate bust right, drapery on far shoulder; reverse Nilus reclining left, hippo under left arm, long reed in right, cornucopia in left, LZ (year 7) in exergue; extremely rare; $320.00 (278.40)


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Hadrian standing left on the Rostra in the Forum, addressing five citizens with hands raised in acclamation, temple behind with four visible columns, SC in exergue
RB57402. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC II 640, Cohen II 416, BMCRE III 1309 note (refs Cohen), Fair, weight 22.9 g, maximum diameter 32.2 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 124 - 128 A.D.; obverse HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS, laureate head right; reverse COS III, Hadrian standing left on the Rostra in the Forum, addressing five citizens with hands raised in acclamation, temple behind with four visible columns (one to the left of Hadrian), S C in exergue; very rare (R2); $300.00 (261.00)


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On his second tour of the empire, Hadrian personally recorded the events of his time in Egypt, but unfortunately his record is lost. P. J. Sijpesteijn pieces together the evidence of Hadrian's itinerary from Egyptian sources in A New Document Concerning Hadrian's Visit to Egypt in Historia: Zeitschrift fr Alte Geschichte , Bd. 18, H. 1 (Jan, 1969), pp. 109-118. Hadrian arrived in Egypt from by land from Arabia near the end of August 130 A.D. While in Egypt, he spent most of his time in Alexandria. He toured Upper Egypt, probably soon after his arrival. On 30 October, to commemorate his deified young beloved, Hadrian founded the city of Antinoopolis in Upper Egypt, not far from the site where Antinous had drowned. In November and December, he visited Thebes, Oxyrhynchus and Tebtynis, and at some point before his departure, he went hunting in the Libyan Desert. Hadrian left Alexandria by sea to Syria, probably in March 131 A.D.
RB72508. Bronze sestertius, BMCRE III 1715, Cohen II 157, Hunter II 607, RIC II 843 (S), SRCV II 3575 var (laureate and draped), F, nice portrait, attractive reverse style, corrosion, large pit before Hadrian's nose, flan crack, weight 21.764 g, maximum diameter 32.4 mm, die axis 45o, Rome mint, 131 - 138 A.D.; obverse HADRIANVS AVG COS III P P, bare-headed, laureate bust right, seen from behind; reverse ALEXANDRIA, Alexandria reclining left, stalks of grain in right hand, vine in left arm which rests on a basket of fruit, four stalks of grain growing in background at feet, S C in exergue; ex Morton & Eden auction 59 (13 - 14 Nov 2012), part of lot 957; ex Kenneth Edwin Day Collection; scarce; $250.00 (217.50)


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Annona was the goddess of harvest and her main attribute is grain. This reverse suggests the arrival of grain by sea from the provinces (especially from Africa) and its distribution to the people.
RB73007. Orichalcum sestertius, BMCRE III 1143 (also heroic bust), Hunter II 326 (same), RIC II 560a (S), Cohen II 180 var (no drapery), SRCV II 3576, VF, nice heroic bust, green patina, about 1/3 on each side a little rough, weight 26.172 g, maximum diameter 34.3 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, late 118 A.D.; obverse IMP CAESAR TRAIANVS HADRIANVS AVG, laureate bust right, bare chest, drapery on left shoulder; reverse ANNONA AVG (in exergue), PONT MAX TR POT COS DES III, Annona standing left, stalks of grain in right hand over modius at feet on left, cornucopia in left, prow behind on right, S - C flanking across field; scarce; $240.00 (208.80)


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Roman Provincial Egypt

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The Lighthouse of Alexandria, also called the Pharos, built by the Ptolemaic Kingdom between 280 and 247 B.C., was one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World. Between 393 and 450 feet (120 - 140 m) tall, it was one of the tallest man-made structures on Earth for many centuries. Damaged by three earthquakes between 956 and 1323, it then became an abandoned ruin. It was the third longest surviving ancient wonder (after the Mausoleum at Halicarnassus and the still extant Great Pyramid of Giza), until in 1480 the last of its remnant stones were used to build the Citadel of Qaitbay on the site. In 1994, French archaeologists discovered some remains of the lighthouse on the floor of Alexandria's Eastern Harbor.
RX75135. Bronze drachm, Dattari 1768; Geissen 1121; Milne 1416; Kampmann 32.588; SNG Cop 386; BMC Alexandria p. 89, 757; Emmett 1002, aF, centered, weight 22.074 g, maximum diameter 32.4 mm, die axis 345o, Alexandria mint, 29 Aug 133 - 28 Aug 134 A.D.; obverse AYT KAIC TPAIAN A∆PIANOC CEB, laureate and draped bust right; reverse Isis Pharia right holding a billowing sail with both hands and left foot, sailing toward the Lighthouse of Pharos, which is surmounted by a statue and two Tritons, each blowing a buccinum (sea shell trumpet), L IH (year 18) above center; big 32 mm bronze; $200.00 (174.00)


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Clementia was the goddess of forgiveness and mercy, which the Romans considered good traits for a caesar or emperor. In 44 B.C., a temple was consecrated to her by the Roman Senate, possibly at Julius Caesar's instigation. She was deified as a celebrated virtue of Julius Caesar, who was famed for his forbearance, especially following his civil war with Pompey from 49 B.C.
SH90477. Silver denarius, BMCRE III 538, RSC II 221, Strack II 333, RIC II 206, SRCV II 3464 var. (bust right), aVF, attractive portrait, toned, scratches, weight 2.562 g, maximum diameter 18.1 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 132 - 134 A.D.; obverse HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS, bare-headed, draped, bust left; reverse CLEMENTIA AVG COS III P P, Clementia standing half left, patera in right, long scepter vertical behind in left; rare with bust left; $195.00 (169.65)


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Hadrian traveled to nearly every province of the Empire and spent more than half his reign outside Italy. Nero had been criticized as self-indulgent for his trip to Greece, but Hadrian proudly advertised his travels with his "Adventus" coinage series. Unlike Nero, the pleasure-seeking tourist, Hadrian inspected and corrected the legions and made grants for the construction of new public buildings, projects and settlements. Hadrian travels were intended to transform conquered lands into a unified Roman Empire.
RB72511. Bronze sestertius, RIC II 888 (S), Hunter II 576, Cohen II 46, BMCRE III 1651, SRCV II 3565, aF, porous, areas of corrosion on reverse, weight 22.997 g, maximum diameter 32.9 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 131 - 138 A.D.; obverse HADRIANVS AVG COS III P P, laureate and draped bust right, from behind; reverse ADVENTVI AVG ITALIAE, Hadrian standing right, his right hand raised, facing and greeting Italia standing left, sacrificing from patera in right over altar between them and holding cornucopia in left hand, sacrificial calf at her feet behind altar, S C in exergue; ex Morton & Eden auction 59 (13 - 14 Nov 2012), part of lot 957; ex Kenneth Edwin Day Collection; scarce; $165.00 (143.55)


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This type of reverse usually indicates the birth of a prince, and we would normally assume the boy and girl on the reverse represent children of the emperor. Hadrian and Sabina, however, had no children.
RB72513. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC II 970b, Hunter II 447, BMCRE III 1370, Cohen II 817 (Hilaritas half nude, probably in error), SRCV II 3602 var (drapery), aF, nice green patina, weight 22.368 g, maximum diameter 32.5 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 128 A.D.; obverse HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS P P, laureate head right, long neck; reverse HILARITAS P R (Joy of the Roman People), Hilaritas standing half left, palm frond in right, cornucopia in left, at her feet on left a small nude boy standing right also holding the palm frond, at feet on right a dressed small girl standing left and reaching up touching Hilaritas' drapery, S - C flanking across field, COS III in exergue; ex Morton & Eden auction 59 (13 - 14 Nov 2012), part of lot 957; ex Kenneth Edwin Day Collection; $160.00 (139.20)


Roman Empire, Anonymous, Domitian to Antoninus Pius, c. 81 - 161 A.D.

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RIC identifies this type as common but it appears to be rare with the dove facing left.

Quadrantes, like quinarii, were issued only occasionally, perhaps exclusively for imperial distributions. Suetonius reported that, from the roof of the Basilica Julia "Caligula threw coins among the people." Perhaps this small coin was thrown to the crowd by the emperor himself at a similar event.
RB63623. Bronze quadrans, RIC II p. 218, 25, VF, weight 1.847 g, maximum diameter 14.4 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, c. 81 - 161 A.D.; obverse diademed and draped bust of Venus right; reverse dove standing left, S C in exergue; rare; $145.00 (126.15)


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Curtis Clay convincingly argues that Hadrian's "travel" coins naming provinces, including those having him arrive in a province, with "ADVENTVS" legends, restoring a province, with "RESTITVTORI" legends, and those having him address a provincial army, with "EXERCITVS" legends, were actually issued beginning soon after his safe return to Rome from his second journey in 131 A.D. Most references date them after 134 A.D.
RB72517. Orichalcum as (or dupondius), BMCRE III 1796, RIC II 942 (R), Cohen II 1227, SRCV II -, aVF, rough and porous, weight 11.106 g, maximum diameter 26.3 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 131 - 138 A.D.; obverse HADRIANVS AVG COS III P P, laureate bust right, from behind; reverse RESTTVTORI AFRICAE, Hadrian standing left, togate, holding volumen and extending hand to raise up kneeling Africa, wearing elephant skin headdress and holding two grain ears; three stalks of grain growing between them, S C in exergue; ex Morton & Eden auction 59 (13 - 14 Nov 2012), part of lot 957; ex Kenneth Edwin Day Collection; rare; $145.00 (126.15)


Roman Egypt, Nov 130 - c. 138 A.D.

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Antinous probably joined the entourage of Hadrian when it passed through Bithynia in about 124. He became Hadrian's constant companion and lover but in October 130 Antinous drowned in the Nile. Hadrian's grief knew no bounds; he enrolled him among the gods, erected a temple, and on 30 October 130 A.D., Hadrian founded the city of Antinoopolis on the very bank of the Nile river where Antinous drowned. It was the capital of a new nome, Antinoopolites. Artists vied with each other in immortalizing his beauty. Temples and statues to his memory were erected all over the Empire, and there began a Cult of Antinous. On this coin he is depicted in the guise of Hermanubis.
RX90577. Lead tessera, cf. Roma Numismatics auction 6, session 2 (29 Sep 2013), lot 925 (otherwise unpublished, realized $484 plus fees); Geissen 3584 for similar obv, aF, edge chip, weight 3.719 g, maximum diameter 22.9 mm, die axis 90o, Alexandria(?) mint, Nov 130 - c. 138 A.D. (possibly later); obverse Antinos on horseback right, wearing hem-hem crown, holding scepter; reverse Osiris standing left, nude to waist, himation around hips and legs, situla in right, long scepter vertical in left, ram at feet on left; extremely rare; $135.00 (117.45)


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Curtis Clay convincingly argues that Hadrian's "travel" coins naming provinces, including those having him arrive in a province, with "ADVENTVS" legends, restoring a province, with "RESTITVTORI" legends, and those having him address a provincial army, with "EXERCITVS" legends, were actually issued beginning soon after his safe return to Rome from his second journey in 131 A.D. Most references date them after 134 A.D.
RB72519. Copper as, Cohen II 35, RIC II 885 (S), BMCRE III 1644 var (laureate and draped), Hunter II - (noted p. lxvi), SRCV II -, F, green patina, some legend unstruck, minor encrustations and corrosion, weight 11.281 g, maximum diameter 26.7 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 131 - 137 A.D.; obverse HADRIANVS AVG COS III P P, bare-headed, draped bust right, from behind; reverse ADVENTVI AVG GALLIAE, Hadrian standing right, holding roll and raising right hand, facing Gallia standing left, left hand at side, sacrificing at altar between them, sacrificial victim below, S C in exergue; ex Morton & Eden auction 59 (13 - 14 Nov 2012), part of lot 957; ex Kenneth Edwin Day Collection; on Wildwinds; scarce; $130.00 (113.10)


Roman Egypt, Nov 130 - c. 138 A.D.

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In a statue at the Vatican of Nilus and Euthenia (his wife, the spirit of prosperity) the 16 cubits of the ideal Nile flood are represented by 16 children, 15 of whom have emerged from a cornucopia and the last of which is still emerging. On coinage the number is reduced. Here, due to space limitations, we have only two.
RX90590. Lead tessera, Savio pl. 322, 6463 (plate does not match the Dattari description); otherwise apparently unpublished, aF, weight 4.526 g, maximum diameter 21.2 mm, die axis 45o, Alexandria(?) mint, probably Nov 132 - Nov 133 A.D.; obverse Antinous on horseback right, wearing hem hem crown, caduceus in right hand, Nike above flying left and crowning him; horse's right foreleg raised, L in right field above it, Γ below (year 3); reverse Nilus seated right on rocks, nude to the waist, himation around hips and legs, holding a cornucopia in his right hand, crocodile left on rocks below; Euthenia standing left before him, wearing a wreath of grain and uraeus, a chiton and peplos, crowning Nilus with a wreath, a child between them reaches to Nilus, child behind her reaches to Euthenia; extremely rare; $125.00 (108.75)


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Curtis Clay convincingly argues that Hadrian's "travel" coins naming provinces, including those having him arrive in a province, with "ADVENTVS" legends, restoring a province, with "RESTITVTORI" legends, and those having him address a provincial army, with "EXERCITVS" legends, were actually issued beginning soon after his safe return to Rome from his second journey in 131 A.D. Most references date them after 134 A.D.
RB72509. Orichalcum sestertius, BMCRE III 1807, RIC II 950, SRCV 3632, Cohen II 1249 var (drapery only on left shoulder), aF, areas of corrosion, weight 22.908 g, maximum diameter 31.3 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 131 - 137 A.D.; obverse HADRIANVS AVG COS III P P, laureate and draped bust right, from behind; reverse RESTITVTORI GALLIAE, Hadrian standing right, raising kneeling Gallia with clasped right hands, S C in exergue; ex Morton & Eden auction 59 (13 - 14 Nov 2012), part of lot 957; ex Kenneth Edwin Day Collection; scarce; $115.00 (100.05)


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Struck at Rome for Use in Syria

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An interesting type with Tyche of Antioch and the river-god Orontes, but struck at the Rome mint!
RP57016. Orichalcum as, McAlee 544a, RIC II 680 corr., SRCV II 3696, F, area of corrosion on rev, weight 8.502 g, maximum diameter 22.9 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 125 - 128 A.D.; obverse HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS, laureate and draped bust right, from behind; reverse COS III, Tyche seated left on rock, stalks of grain in right hand, resting left elbow on stork, river god swimming right at feet, S - C flanking across field; rare (R2); $110.00 (95.70)


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D. Struck at Rome for Use in Syria

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In 125 A.D., the Pantheon was constructed in Rome as it stands today.
RP65923. Orichalcum as, McAlee 551, SRCV II 3695, RIC II 666 corr., VF, cleaning scratches, weight 7.465 g, maximum diameter 23.8 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 125 - 128 A.D.; obverse HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS, laureate and draped bust right, from behind; reverse COS III, Roma seated left on cuirass, right foot drawn back and resting on helmet, Victory in right, long scepter vertical behind in left, round shield behind cuirass, S C in exergue; rare; $105.00 (91.35)


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Caesarea, Cappadocia

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Kayseri, Turkey was originally named Mazaca. It was renamed Eusebia by Ariarathes V Eusebes, King of Cappadocia, 163 - 130 B.C. The last king of Cappadocia, King Archelaus, renamed it "Caesarea in Cappadocia" to honor Caesar Augustus upon his death in 14 A.D. Muslim Arabs slightly modified the name into Kaisariyah, which became Kayseri when the Seljuk Turks took control, c. 1080 A.D.
RP90613. Silver hemidrachm, Metcalf 86a; Sydenham Caesarea 255; BMC Galatia p. 62, 140; SNGvA 6413; SNG Cop 223 var (draped and cuirassed), gF, well centered, struck with worn dies, weight 1.560 g, maximum diameter 15.8 mm, die axis 0o, Cappadocia, Caesarea mint, 120 - 121 A.D.; obverse AYTO KAIC TPAI A∆PIANOC CEBACT, laureate bust right, slight drapery on far shoulder; reverse Victory advancing right, wreath in extended right, palm frond over shoulder in left, ET ∆ (year 4) in right field; ex CNG auction 326, part of lot 713; $105.00 (91.35)


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Roman Provincial Egypt

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The Greek numeral sixteen (Iς) above Nilus refers to what was considered the ideal height of the annual Nile flood, sixteen cubits. Less could mean drought or famine. Even in modern times grand celebrations were held when the flood reached 16 cubits. In years when the flood failed to reach 16 cubits, the celebrations were canceled, and prayers and fasting were held instead. The peak flood occurred at the end of August, which explains why the Egyptian year began on 29 August.
RX74299. Bronze drachm, Geissen 1001; Dattari 1808; Milne 1276; SNG Cop 350; BMC Alexandria p. 92, 785; Kampmann-Ganschow 32.470; Emmett 1014, aF, edge split, weight 24.92 g, maximum diameter 35.8 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, 29 Aug 128 - 28 Aug 129; obverse AVT KAIC TPAI A∆PIA CEB, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, wearing aegis, from behind; reverse Nilus reclining left on a crocodile right, himation around waist and legs, cornucopia in right from which an infant genius emerges, reed in left, Iς above, L TPICKAI (year 13) in exergue; big 36 mm bronze!; $80.00 (69.60)


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Roman Provincial Egypt

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RX75679. Bronze obol, Milne 1292, Dattari 1923, Emmett 166 (R5) , BMC Alexandria -, Geissen -, SNG Cop -, aVF, green patina, weight 3.9 g, maximum diameter 18.5 mm, die axis 160o, Alexandria mint, 29 Aug 129 - 28 Aug 130 A.D.; obverse AYT KAIC TPAI − A∆PIACEB, laureate head right; reverse modius containing three poppies and two stalks of grain, flanked by two lit torches, LI∆ (year 14) in exergue; very rare; $75.00 (65.25)


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Roman Provincial Egypt

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The Greek numeral sixteen (Iς) above Nilus refers to what was considered the ideal height of the annual Nile flood, sixteen cubits. Less could mean drought or famine. Even in modern times grand celebrations were held when the flood reached 16 cubits. In years when the flood failed to reach 16 cubits, the celebrations were canceled, and prayers and fasting were held instead. The peak flood occurred at the end of August, which explains why the Egyptian year began on 29 August.
RX59672. Bronze drachm, Geissen 992; BMC Alexandria p. 92, 786 cor (says elephant); Milne 1267; Dattari 1805; SNG Cop 346; Kampman and Ganschow 32.462, aF, weight 25.972 g, maximum diameter 34.5 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, 29 Aug 127 - 28 Aug 128 A.D.; obverse AVT KAIC TRA A∆PIA CEB, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse Nilus reclining left, cornucopia from which genius emerges in right, reed in left, hippopotamus under elbow, Iς above, L ∆W∆EK (regnal year 12) in ex; big 34.5 mm bronze!; $60.00 (52.20)


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Roman Provincial Egypt

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RX73012. Bronze obol, BMC Alexandria p. 99, 854, Milne 1235; Geissen 966; Dattari 2023; SNG Cop 336; Emmett 1169, Choice F, weight 5.160 g, maximum diameter 20.4 mm, die axis 180o, Alexandria mint, 29 Aug 126 - 28 Aug 127 A.D.; obverse AVT KAI - TRAI A∆PIA CEB, laureate head right; reverse stag with large antlers standing right, head looking upward, date L IA (year 11) in fields; $60.00 (52.20)


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Roman Provincial Egypt

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During Hadrian's reign Italian agriculture declined as imports from Egypt and North Africa depressed wheat prices, making it unprofitable to farm and forcing many farmers off the land. In Rome, bread was distributed free to the poor and Roman bakeries produced dozens of bread varieties.
RX57430. Bronze drachm, Milne 1357; Geissen 1068; Dattari 1627; SNG Cop 270; BMC Alexandria p. 82, 694, Fair, weight 19.816 g, maximum diameter 33.1 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, 29 Aug 132 - 28 Aug 133 A.D.; obverse AYT KAIC TPAIAN A∆PIANOC CEB, laureate and draped bust right, wearing aegis, from behind; reverse Athena standing left wearing crested helmet, two stalks of grain in right hand, resting left on grounded shield behind, L I-Z (year 17) across field; big 33mm bronze!; $55.00 (47.85)







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OBVERSE LEGENDS

AVGVSTVSHADRIANVS
AVGVSTVSHADRIANVSPP
DIVVSHADRIANVSAVG
HADRIANVSAVGCOSIIIPP
HADRIANVSAVGVST
HADRIANVSAVGVSTVS
HADRIANVSAVGVSTVSPP
IMPCAEDITRAIANFDIVNERNEPTRAHADRIANOAVG
IMPCAEDIRAPARFDIVINERNEPTRAHADRIANOAVG
IMPCAESARTRAIAHADRIANVSAVG
IMPCAESARTRAIANHADRIANVSAVG
IMPCAESARTRAIANVSHADRIANVSAVG
IMPCAESARTRAIANVSHADRIANVSAVGPMTRPCOSIII
IMPCAESHADRIANDIVINERTRAIANOPTFIL
IMPCAESTRAHADRIANOAVGPP
IMPCAESTRAIANHADRIANOAVGDIVITRA
IMPCAESTRAIANHADRIANOAVGDIVITRAPARTHF
IMPCAESTRAIANHADRIANOPTAVGGERDAC
IMPCAESTRAIANHADRIANOOPTAVGGERDAC


REFERENCES

Banti, A. and L. Simonetti. Corpus Nummorum Romanorum. (Florence, 1972-1979).
Blum, G. "Numismatique D'Antinoos" in JIAN 16. (Athens, 1914). pp. 33 - 70.
Calic, E.X. The Roman Avrei, Vol. I: From the Republic to Pertinax, 196 BC - 193 AD. (Barcelona, 2003).
Cohen, H. Description historique des monnaies frappes sous l'Empire Romain, Vol. 2: Nerva to Antoninus Pius. (Paris, 1883).
Hill, P.V. The Dating and Arrangement of the Undated Coins of Rome, A.D. 98-148. (London, 1970).
Mattingly H. & E. Sydenham. The Roman Imperial Coinage, Vol. II: Vespasian to Hadrian. (London, 1926).
Mattingly, H. & R.A.G. Carson. Coins of the Roman Empire in the British Museum, Vol. 3: Nerva to Hadrian. (London, 1936).
McAlee, R. The Coins of Roman Antioch. (Lancaster, PA, 2007).
Robinson, A.S. Roman Imperial Coins in the Hunter Coin Cabinet. II. Trajan to Commodus (London, 1971).
Seaby, H.A. & R. Loosley. Roman Silver Coins, Vol. II: Tiberius to Commodus. (London, 1979).
Sear, D.R. Roman Coins and Their Values, Vol. II: The Accession of Nerva to the Overthrow of the Severan Dynasty AD 96 - AD 235. (London, 2002).
Toynbee, J.M.C. Roman medallions. ANSNS 5. (New York, 1944).
Vagi, D. Coinage and History of the Roman Empire. (Sidney, 1999).

Catalog current as of Sunday, August 02, 2015.
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Roman Coins of Hadrian