Coins and Antiquities Consignment Shop
  Welcome Guest. Please login or register. All items are guaranteed authentic for eternity! Please call us if you have questions 252-646-1958. Thanks for your business! Welcome Guest. Please login or register. Internet challenged? We are happy to take your order over the phone. Please call if you have questions 252-646-1958. Thanks for your business!

Catalog Main Menu
Fine Coins Showcase

Antiquities Showcase
Recent Additions
Recent Price Reductions

Show empty categories
Shop Search
Shopping Cart
Contact Us
About Forum
Shopping at Forum
Our Guarantee
Payment Options
Shipping Options & Fees
Privacy & Security
Forum Staff
Selling Your Coins
Identifying Your Coin
   View Categories
Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Roman Coins ▸ The Adoptive EmperorsView Options:  |  |  |   

Roman Coins of the Adoptive Emperors

Antoninus Pius, August 138 - 7 March 161 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
In 146, Marcus Aurelius received the imperium proconsular and Faustina the Younger was given the title Augusta.
SH73156. Orichalcum sestertius, BMCRE IV 1669, RIC III 767a, Strack III 974, Cohen II 320, Hill UCR 709, SRCV II 4168, VF, nice green patina, nice portrait, light scratches, tight flan, weight 22.051 g, maximum diameter 31.5 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, c. 146 A.D.; obverse ANTONINVS AVG - PIVS P P TR P, laureate head right; reverse Antoninus in slow quadriga left, eagle-tipped scepter in left, reins in right, COS IIII / S C in two lines in exergue; $480.00 (408.00)

Trajan, 25 January 98 - 8 or 9 August 117 A.D., Parion, Mysia

Click for a larger photo
Plotina was Trajan's wife, married to him before he became emperor. She was renowned for her virtue and simplicity. Marciana was Trajan's eldest sister and the mother of Matidia. She was an accomplished woman who lost her husband before her brother's succession. Matidia lived as a widow with Plotina and they were united by the tenderest and most uninterrupted friendship. Both were awarded the title Augusta at the same time in 105. Marciana died c. 112 - 114. Plotina died in 129 A.D.
RP87105. Bronze AE 19, RPC III 1543 (17 spec.), SNG BnF 1468, Weber 5151; countermark: Howgego 304 (11 or 17 of this type in RIC have this countermark), VF, rough and porous, off center, area on reverse flattened by counter marking, area of corrosion on reverse, weight 2.772 g, maximum diameter 18.7 mm, die axis 180o, Parium (Kemer, Canakkale, Turkey) mint, c. 105- 114 A.D.; obverse TRAIAN AVG, laureate bust right slight drapery on far shoulder; countermark: capricorn right in an oval punch; reverse MARCIANA ET PLOTINA AVG, confronting draped busts of Plotina and Marciana; rare; $450.00 (382.50)

Crispina, Wife of Commodus, Augusta 178 - 182 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Venus (Aphrodite) can be faulted for the Trojan War. Upset that she was not invited to a wedding, she went anyway and maliciously left a golden apple inscribed "For the fairest" on the banquet table. The goddesses, as Aphrodite expected, argued who was the rightful possessor of this prize. It was determined the most handsome mortal in the world, a noble Trojan youth named Paris, would decide. Each of the three finalists offered Paris a bribe. Hera promised he would rule the world. Athena said she would make him victorious in battle. Aphrodite guaranteed the love of the most beautiful woman in the world. This was Helen, who was married to the king of Sparta. Paris awarded the golden apple to Aphrodite. Aphrodite enabled Paris to elope with Helen, Helen of Troy. Helen's husband raised a Greek army to retrieve his wife, starting the Trojan War.
RS86693. Silver denarius, RIC III Commodus 288 (S), RSC II 39a, BMCRE IV 50, MIR 21, Hunter II 15, SRCV II 6003, Choice gVF, excellent portrait, well centered and struck, attractive toning, flan edge a bit ragged with many small cracks, weight 2.716 g, maximum diameter 19.3 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 180 - 182 A.D.; obverse CRISPINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right, hair in round coil low at back; reverse VENVS FELIX, Venus seated left on throne without back, Victory in right hand, long grounded scepter vertical in left hand; from the Jyrki Muona Collection, ex Ancient Coin Art; scarce; $350.00 (297.50)

Trajan, 25 January 98 - 8 or 9 August 117 A.D., Cyrene, Cyrenaica

Click for a larger photo
In 74 B.C., Cyrene was made a Roman province. Previously under the Ptolemies the Jewish inhabitants had enjoyed equal rights. Under, Rome they were increasingly oppressed by the now autonomous and much larger Greek population. Tensions came to a head in the insurrection of the Jews of Cyrene under Vespasian in 73 A.D. and especially during Kitos War, under Trajan, in 117. The later revolt was quelled by Marcius Turbo, but not before huge numbers of civilians had been brutally massacred by the Jewish rebels. According to Eusebius of Caesarea, the Jewish rebellion left Libya so depopulated that a few years later Hadrian had to establish new colonies there just to maintain the viability of the settlement.
RP86686. Silver hemidrachm, RPC III 3 (76 spec.); SNG Cop 203 (Caesarea); Sydenham Caesarea 178 (Caesarea), BMC Galatia p. 53, 56 (Caesarea), gVF, attractive style, toned, minor porosity, light bumps and marks, light encrustations, weight 1.618 g, maximum diameter 15.0 mm, die axis 195o, Kyrene (near Shahhat, Libya) mint, 100 A.D.; obverse AYT KAIς NEP TPAIAN ΣEB ΓEPM, laureate head right; reverse ∆HMAPX EΞ YΠAT Γ (Consul for the 3rd time), head of Zeus-Ammon right, bearded and horned; from the Jyrki Muona Collection, ex Classical Numismatic Group, auction 73 (13 Sep 2006), lot 762; very rare; $320.00 (272.00)

Faustina Junior, Augusta 146 - Winter 175/176 A.D., Wife of Marcus Aurelius

Click for a larger photo
In Roman religion, Concordia was the goddess of agreement, understanding, and marital harmony. The cult of Concordia Augusta ("Majestic Harmony") was of special importance to the imperial household. She is usually depicted wearing a long cloak and holding a patera (sacrificial bowl), a cornucopia (symbol of prosperity), or a caduceus (symbol of peace).
RB26685. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC III AP1368, BMCRE IV AP2198, Hunter II 50, Cohen III 22, SRCV II 4710, VF, weight 19.689 g, maximum diameter 31.5 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, struck under Antoninus Pius, 157 - 161 A.D.; obverse FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right, hair wavy and drawn back into coil at back; reverse AVGVSTI PII FIL (daughter of the pius emperor), Concordia standing left, patera in extended right, cornucopia in left hand, S - C across field below center; $275.00 (233.75)

Trajan, 25 January 98 - 8 or 9 August 117 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
A gilded 2nd century B.C. slightly over-lifesize bronze statue, Hercules of the Forum Boarium, has Hercules in a similar pose. This statue is probably the one mentioned by Pliny, which originally stood in the Temple of Hercules Victor, by the Tiber. It lacks the lion skin. Perhaps a actual lion skin was once draped on it. The sculpture is now in the Musei Capitolini, Rome. Another similar sculpture, from the 2nd Century A.D., the Hercules of the Theatre of Pompey, was discovered in 1864, carefully buried under protective tiles. It was incised FCS (fulgor conditum summanium), indicating that it had been struck by lightning, and had been carefully interred on the spot. The figure lightly supports himself on his grounded vertical club, the skin of the Nemean Lion is draped over his left forearm. This sculpture is now in the round room area of Museo Pio-Clementino, in the Vatican.Hercules_Sculptures
RS86635. Silver denarius, Woytek 100a, RIC II 49, RSC II 234, BMCRE III 86, BnF IV 108, Hunter II 41, Strack I 40, SRCV II -, Choice VF, well centered, toned, light marks, weight 3.393 g, maximum diameter 18.3 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 101 - Oct 102 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES NERVA TRAIAN AVG GERM, laureate head right; reverse P M TR P COS IIII P P, statue of Hercules standing facing on low base, nude except for lion skin draped over head, shoulders and left arm, club downward in right hand, apples of Hesperides in his left hand; $275.00 (233.75)

Sabina, Augusta 128 - c. 136 A.D., Wife of Hadrian, Amphipolis, Macedonia

Click for a larger photo
Plotina was the wife of Trajan, married to him before his succession. She was renowned for her virtue and simplicity. In 100, Trajan awarded her with the title of Augusta, but she did not accept the title until 105. Plotina did not appear on the coinage until 112. She was largely responsible for Hadrian's succession to the throne after the death of Trajan. Plotina died in 129 A.D.
RP83496. Bronze AE 25, RPC Online III 655 (8 spec.); BMC Macedonia p. 56, 103; Varbanov 3186 (R5); SNG Evelpidis 1171; Lindgren 987; SNG Cop -; SNG ANS -; SNG Hunterian -, VF, green patina, tight flan, some corrosion and scratches, reverse off center, centration dimples, weight 12.382 g, maximum diameter 24.5 mm, die axis 180o, Amphipolis mint, 128 - c. 136 A.D.; obverse CABEINA CEBACTH, draped bust right wearing stephane, pellet within crescent with horns up left below chin; reverse AMΦIΠOΛTWN, Tyche seated left on high back throne, wearing turreted crown, patera in right hand; rare; $260.00 (221.00)

Trajan, 25 January 98 - 8 or 9 August 117 A.D., Ulpianum Mines Issue

Click for a larger photo
This type is from a series of semisses and quadrantes struck in Rome for use in the closed imperial mine communities of the Balkan region. Some types name the mines in the reverse legends: METALLI VLPIANI DELM (for Dalmatia), METALLI VLPIANI PANN (for Pannonia) and DARDANICI (for Dardania, Moesia).
RB86484. Bronze quadrans, Woytek 611b, Simic-Vasic 11, BMCRE III - (p. 234 note & pl. 45, 13), RIC II 704 (R2) var., BnF IV 973 var., SRCV II 3252 (all var. obv. leg.), F, nice portrait, corrosion/porosity, part of reverse legend unstruck, weight 2.813 g, maximum diameter 18.8 mm, die axis 235o, Rome mint, c. 107 - 109 A.D.(?); obverse IMP CAES TRAIAN AVG GER DAC, laureate bust right, drapery on far shoulder; reverse METALLI VLPIANI, Aequitas (or Moneta?) standing half left, scales in right hand, cornucopia in left hand; very rare; $240.00 (204.00)

Lucius Verus, 7 March 161 - February 169 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
In late summer or fall of 161, Vologases IV of Parthia captured the Roman client Kingdom of Armenia, expelled its king and installed his own; Pacorus, an Arsacid like himself. In 162, Lucius Verus began the war to recover Armenia and exact vengeance for Parthia's invasions of Armenia and Syria. The Armenian capital Artaxata was recovered in 163. At the end of 163, Verus took the title Armeniacus, despite having never personally seen combat. Marcus Aurelius initially declined to accept the title, but accepted it in 164.
RS85602. Silver denarius, RIC III 491, RSC II156, BMCRE IV 229, Hunter II 8, SRCV II 5354, Choice EF, well centered bold strike, attractive portrait, excellent reverse detail, some luster, small edge cracks, weight 3.210 g, maximum diameter 18.3 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 162 - 163 A.D.; obverse IMP L VERVS AVG, bare head right; reverse PROV DEOR TR P III COS II (to the providence of the gods, holder of Tribunitian power for 3 years, consul 2 times), Providentia standing half left, globe in extended right hand, cornucopia in left hand; $220.00 (187.00)

Trajan, 25 January 98 - 8 or 9 August 117 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
"Trajan, having crossed the Ister by means of the bridge, conducted the war with safe prudence rather than with haste, and eventually, after a hard struggle, vanquished the Dacians. In the course of the campaign he himself performed many deeds of good generalship and bravery, and his troops ran many risks and displayed great prowess on his behalf. It was here that a certain horseman, after being carried, badly wounded, from the battle in the hope that he could be healed, when he found that he could not recover, rushed from his tent (for his injury had not yet reached his heart) and, taking his place once more in the line, perished after displaying great feats of valor." -- Roman History by Cassius Dio
RB77285. Orichalcum sestertius, Woytek 203o, BnF IV 564, RIC II 535 (S), Strack 360, Banti 215, BMCRE III -, Cayn -, aF, well centered, corrosion, pitting, weight 21.572 g, maximum diameter 32.8 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, c. 104 - 107 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES NERVAE TRAIANO AVG GER DAC P M TR P COS V P P, laureate bust left; reverse S P Q R OPTIMO PRINCIPI, Trajan on horseback galloping right, in military dress, brandishing spear at Dacian warrior who is falling on his left knee, looking back at Trajan, raising both hands, and being trampled by horse's fore-hooves, S C (senatus consulto) in exergue; very rare bust left; $215.00 (182.75)


Catalog current as of Friday, March 23, 2018.
Page created in 1.221 seconds.
Adoptive Emperors