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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Featured Collections| ▸ |Ray Nouri Collection||View Options:  |  |  |   

The Ray Nouri Collection

Ray Nouri, of Upstate New York, began assembling this collection with his father in the 1950s, and has continued to add to the collection until today. The collection reflects the love for ancient history and for the beauty of ancient numismatic art that Ray and his father shared. Ray writes, "These were the main factors that drove my father to collect and study these ancient coins. He spent countless hours mapping the origin, routes and background that each coin followed. He used to say to me, 'Do you know you are holding a piece of history in your hands when you hold one of these coins?'" Here we list only some of the several thousand coins in the collection, coming from across the ancient world, including the Holy Land. More will be added over time. Ray shares his wishes for new owners of these coins, "I truly hope you enjoy them as much as my father and I have throughout the years."

Valens, 28 March 364 - 9 August 378 A.D.

|Valens|, |Valens,| |28| |March| |364| |-| |9| |August| |378| |A.D.|, |solidus|
Valens ruled the Eastern Roman Empire from the Danube to the Persian border. He allowed Goths, who were driven from their home by the Huns, to settle in the Danube provinces. The Goths were so badly treated by Romans that they rebelled. Valens was defeated and killed by the Goths at the battle of Hadrianople.
SH94513. Gold solidus, RIC IX Antioch 2(c)i3, Depeyrot 30/2, SRCV V 19566, Cohen VIII 32, Hunter V -, VF, well centered, bumps, marks, scratches, slight bend, weight 4.345 g, maximum diameter 21.0 mm, die axis 180o, 6th officina, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, Oct 367 - end 367 A.D.; obverse D N VALENS PER F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse RESTITVTOR REIPVBLICAE, emperor standing facing, head right, vexillum with cross on flag in right hand, Victory standing on globe presenting wreath in left hand, ANTS (S recut over Z) in exergue; from the Ray Nouri Collection; $1250.00 SALE |PRICE| $1125.00


Hadrian, 11 August 11FORVM Hadrian 117-138 AD Silver Denarius7 - 10 July 138 A.D.

|Hadrian|, |Hadrian,| |11| |August| |11FORVM| |Hadrian| |117-138| |AD| |Silver| |Denarius7| |-| |10| |July| |138| |A.D.|, |denarius|
Roma was a female deity who personified the city of Rome and more broadly, the Roman state. The earliest certain cult to dea Roma was established at Smyrna in 195 B.C., probably to mark the successful alliance against Antiochus III. In 30/29 B.C., the Koinon of Asia and Bithynia requested permission to honor Augustus as a living god. "Republican" Rome despised the worship of a living man, but an outright refusal might offend their loyal allies. A cautious formula was drawn up, non-Romans could only establish a cult for divus Augustus jointly with dea Roma. In the city of Rome itself, the earliest known state cult to dea Roma was combined with Venus at the Hadrianic Temple of Venus and Roma. This was the largest temple in the city, probably dedicated to inaugurate the reformed festival of Parilia, which was known thereafter as the Romaea after the Eastern festival in Roma's honor. The temple contained the seated, Hellenised image of dea Roma with a Palladium in her right hand to symbolize Rome's eternity.
RS94564. Silver denarius, RIC II-3 722, RIC II 161, RSC II 349, BMCRE III 361, SRCV II 3472, Hunter II 140, SRCV II 3472, Hunter II 140, VF, nice portrait, flow lines, light tone, light marks, slightly off center on a broad flan, reverse die wear, small edge cracks/splits, weight 3.356 g, maximum diameter 19.7 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, c. 124 - 125 A.D.; obverse HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS, laureate head right, slight drapery on left shoulder; reverse COS III, Roma standing left, wearing helmet and military dress, Victory in right hand, short spear in left hand; from the Ray Nouri Collection; $190.00 SALE |PRICE| $171.00


Faustina Sr., Augusta 25 February 138 - Early 141, Wife of Antoninus Pius

|Faustina| |Sr.|, |Faustina| |Sr.,| |Augusta| |25| |February| |138| |-| |Early| |141,| |Wife| |of| |Antoninus| |Pius|, |denarius|
Antoninus Pius wrote of his wife Faustina, "I would rather live with her on Gyara [an island of exile] than without her in the palace." Sadly, Faustina died just two years into his 23 year reign. At his request, the Senate deified her, and he minted a massive series of commemorative coins in her honor.
RS94547. Silver denarius, RIC III AP350a(b) (S), RSC II 34a, BMCRE IV AP291, Hunter II 1, SRCV II 4575 var. (no veil), aVF, well centered, flow lines, porous, die wear, edge split/cracks, weight 3.199 g, maximum diameter 17.9 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, posthumous, 143 A.D.; obverse DIVA AVG FAVSTINA, draped bust right, hair elaborately waived and banded, drawn up at the back and piled in a round coil at top; reverse AETERNITAS, Providentia (or Aeternitas) standing left, globe extended in right hand, long scepter vertical in left hand; first specimen of this veiled variant handled by FORVM, from the Ray Nouri Collection; rare variety; $120.00 SALE |PRICE| $108.00


Faustina Sr., Augusta 25 February 138 - Early 141, Wife of Antoninus Pius

|Faustina| |Sr.|, |Faustina| |Sr.,| |Augusta| |25| |February| |138| |-| |Early| |141,| |Wife| |of| |Antoninus| |Pius|, |denarius|
Ceres' known mythology is indistinguishable from Demeter's. Her virgin daughter Proserpina (Persephone) was abducted by Hades to be his wife in the underworld. Ceres searched for her endlessly lighting her way through the earth with torches. While Ceres (Demeter) searched, she was preoccupied with her loss and her grief. The seasons halted; living things ceased their growth, then began to die. Some say that in her anger she laid a curse on the world that caused plants to wither and die, and the land to become desolate. Faced with the extinction of all life on earth, Zeus sent his messenger Hermes to the underworld to bring Proserpina back. However, because she had eaten while in the underworld, Hades had a claim on her. Therefore, it was decreed that she would spend four months each year in the underworld. During these months Ceres grieves for her daughter's absence, withdrawing her gifts from the world, creating winter. Proserpina's return brings the spring.
RS94549. Silver denarius, RIC III AP362, BMCRE IV AP421, RSC II 104, Hunter II 35, SRCV II 4584, VF, well centered, radiating flow lines, scattered porosity, flan edge a little ragged with small splits/cracks, weight 3.347 g, maximum diameter 19.2 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, posthumous, 147 - 161 A.D.; obverse DIVA FAVSTINA, draped bust right, hair elaborately waved and banded, drawn up at back and piled in a round coil at top; reverse AVGVSTA, Ceres standing facing, veiled head left, grounded long torch in right hand, raising drapery at waist with left hand; from the Ray Nouri Collection; $115.00 SALE |PRICE| $103.00


Faustina Sr., Augusta 25 February 138 - Early 141, Wife of Antoninus Pius

|Faustina| |Sr.|, |Faustina| |Sr.,| |Augusta| |25| |February| |138| |-| |Early| |141,| |Wife| |of| |Antoninus| |Pius|, |denarius|
Providentia is the personification of the ability to foresee and to make provision for the future. This ability was considered essential for the emperor and providentia was among the embodiments of virtues that were part of the imperial cult. Cicero said that providentia, memoria (memory) and intellegentia (understanding) are the three main components of prudentia, the knowledge what is good or bad or neither.
RS94557. Silver denarius, RIC III AP351, RSC II 32, BMCRE IV AP375, SRCV II 4578, Hunter II 23, VF, flow lines, porosity, reverse a little off center, edge ragged with small splits, weight 2.982 g, maximum diameter 18.7 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, posthumous, 147 - 161 A.D.; obverse DIVA FAVSTINA, draped bust right, hair elaborately waived and banded with pearls, drawn up at the back and piled in a round coil at top; reverse AETERNITAS, Providentia standing slightly left, head left, globe in extended right hand, veil blown out behind head in left hand; from the Ray Nouri Collection; $105.00 SALE |PRICE| $94.00


Commodus, March or April 177 - 31 December 192 A.D.

|Commodus|, |Commodus,| |March| |or| |April| |177| |-| |31| |December| |192| |A.D.|, |denarius|
The elaborate Annona reverse composition reflects the special care Commodus took in supplying the much needed African grain to Rome (in fear of mob uprisings).
RS94704. Silver denarius, RIC III 95, RSC II 17, BMCRE IV 144, MIR 18 647, SRCV II 5627, Hunter II - (p. clii), VF, centered on a tight flan, some mint luster, flow lines, part of edge ragged with splits and cracks, weight 2.770 g, maximum diameter 19.0 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 184 A.D.; obverse COMM ANT AVG P BRIT, laureate head right; reverse P M TR P VIIII IMP VII COS IIII P P, Annona standing slightly left, head left, statuette of Concordia holding patera and scepter in Annona's right hand, cornucopia in her left hand, modius overflowing with grain at feet on left, two persons on prow at feet on right, ANN in exergue; from the Ray Nouri Collection; $90.00 SALE |PRICE| $81.00


Faustina Sr., Augusta 25 February 138 - Early 141, Wife of Antoninus Pius

|Faustina| |Sr.|, |Faustina| |Sr.,| |Augusta| |25| |February| |138| |-| |Early| |141,| |Wife| |of| |Antoninus| |Pius|, |denarius|
Ceres a goddess of agriculture, grain crops, fertility and motherly relationships, was listed among the Di Consentes, Rome's equivalent to the Twelve Olympians of Greek mythology. The Romans saw her as the counterpart of the Greek goddess Demeter, whose mythology was reinterpreted for Ceres in Roman art and literature.
RS94539. Silver denarius, RIC III AP358, RSC II 93, BMCRE IV AP389, SRCV II 4581, Hunter II 26, F, light toning, flow lines, edge splits/cracks, reverse slightly off center, weight 3.092 g, maximum diameter 17.5 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 141 - 161 A.D.; obverse DIVA FAVSTINA, draped bust right, hair elaborately waived and banded, drawn up at the back and piled in a round coil at top; reverse AVGVSTA, Ceres standing slightly right, head right, long scepter vertical behind in right hand, two heads of grain in left hand; from the Ray Nouri Collection; $90.00 SALE |PRICE| $81.00


Faustina Sr., Augusta 25 February 138 - Early 141, Wife of Antoninus Pius

|Faustina| |Sr.|, |Faustina| |Sr.,| |Augusta| |25| |February| |138| |-| |Early| |141,| |Wife| |of| |Antoninus| |Pius|, |denarius|
Ceres a goddess of agriculture, grain crops, fertility and motherly relationships, was listed among the Di Consentes, Rome's equivalent to the Twelve Olympians of Greek mythology. The Romans saw her as the counterpart of the Greek goddess Demeter, whose mythology was reinterpreted for Ceres in Roman art and literature.
RS94554. Silver denarius, RIC III AP358, RSC II 93, BMCRE IV AP389, SRCV II 4581, gF, nice portrait, light marks, die wear, edge cracks/splits, weight 3.171 g, maximum diameter 18.3 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 141 - 161 A.D.; obverse DIVA FAVSTINA, draped bust right, hair elaborately waived and banded, drawn up at the back and piled in a round coil at top; reverse AVGVSTA, Ceres standing slightly right, long scepter vertical behind in right, two heads of grain in left; from the Ray Nouri Collection; $90.00 SALE |PRICE| $81.00


Faustina Sr., Augusta 25 February 138 - Early 141, Wife of Antoninus Pius

|Faustina| |Sr.|, |Faustina| |Sr.,| |Augusta| |25| |February| |138| |-| |Early| |141,| |Wife| |of| |Antoninus| |Pius|, |denarius|
Providentia is the personification of the ability to foresee and to make provision for the future. This ability was considered essential for the emperor and providentia was among the embodiments of virtues that were part of the imperial cult. Cicero said that providentia, memoria (memory) and intellegentia (understanding) are the three main components of prudentia, the knowledge what is good or bad or neither.
RS94556. Silver denarius, RIC III AP351, RSC II 32, BMCRE IV AP375, SRCV II 4578, Hunter II 23, F, nice portrait for the grade, flow lines, porosity, small encrustations, light marks, edge cracks, weight 3.370 g, maximum diameter 17.9 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, posthumous, 147 - 161 A.D.; obverse DIVA FAVSTINA, draped bust right, hair elaborately waived and banded with pearls, drawn up at the back and piled in a round coil at top; reverse AETERNITAS, Providentia standing slightly left, head left, globe in extended right hand, veil blown out behind head in left hand; from the Ray Nouri Collection; $90.00 SALE |PRICE| $81.00


Faustina Sr., Augusta 25 February 138 - Early 141, Wife of Antoninus Pius

|Faustina| |Sr.|, |Faustina| |Sr.,| |Augusta| |25| |February| |138| |-| |Early| |141,| |Wife| |of| |Antoninus| |Pius|, |denarius|
Ceres' known mythology is indistinguishable from Demeter's. Her virgin daughter Proserpina (Persephone) was abducted by Hades to be his wife in the underworld. Ceres searched for her endlessly lighting her way through the earth with torches. While Ceres (Demeter) searched, she was preoccupied with her loss and her grief. The seasons halted; living things ceased their growth, then began to die. Some say that in her anger she laid a curse on the world that caused plants to wither and die, and the land to become desolate. Faced with the extinction of all life on earth, Zeus sent his messenger Hermes to the underworld to bring Proserpina back. However, because she had eaten while in the underworld, Hades had a claim on her. Therefore, it was decreed that she would spend four months each year in the underworld. During these months Ceres grieves for her daughter's absence, withdrawing her gifts from the world, creating winter. Proserpina's return brings the spring.
RS94541. Silver denarius, RIC III AP362, BMCRE IV AP421, RSC II 104, Hunter II 35, SRCV II 4584, F, light toning, centered on a tight flan, porosity/light corrosion, edge splits/cracks, weight 3.350 g, maximum diameter 18.4 mm, die axis 150o, Rome mint, posthumous, 147 - 161 A.D.; obverse DIVA FAVSTINA, draped bust right, hair elaborately waved and banded, drawn up at back and piled in a round coil at top; reverse AVGVSTA, Ceres standing facing, veiled head left, grounded long torch in right hand, raising drapery at waist with left hand; from the Ray Nouri Collection; $80.00 SALE |PRICE| $72.00




  



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