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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Animals| ▸ |Fish||View Options:  |  |  |   

Fish
Kyzikos, Mysia, c. 550 - 450 B.C.

|Cyzicus|, |Kyzikos,| |Mysia,| |c.| |550| |-| |450| |B.C.|, |stater|
Seirios (Sirius) was the god or goddess of the Dog-Star, the brightest star of the constellation Canis Major. The pre-dawn rising of the star in the path of the sun was believed to be the source of the scorching heat and droughts of midsummer. Seirios appears in many guises was variously described as Maira daughter of the Titan Atlas, Maira the dog of the hero Icarius, Lailaps the hound of Orion, and Kyon Khryseos the golden-hound of Zeus. It may also have been associated with Orthros ("Morning Twilight") the hound of Geryon, giant of the west. The star was no doubt also connected with the dog-loving goddess Hekate who was the daughter of Perses "the Destroyer" and Asteria "the Starry One." -- www.theoi.com/Titan/AsterSeirios.html
SH86217. Electrum stater, Von Fritze I (Nomisma VII) 104 & pl. 3, 23; Boston MFA 1433; SNG BnF 245; SNG Cop -; SNGvA -; BMC Mysia -, VF, tight flan, edge cracks, weight 16.091 g, maximum diameter 19.9 mm, die axis 0o, Kyzikos mint, c. 550 - 450 B.C.; obverse winged dog (Sirius?) seated left, head turned back right, curved archaic wing, wearing collar, tunny fish below to left; reverse quadripartite incuse square; extremely rare; SOLD


Kyzikos, Mysia, c. 500 - 450 B.C.

|Cyzicus|, |Kyzikos,| |Mysia,| |c.| |500| |-| |450| |B.C.|, |hekte|
Cyzicus was one of the great cities of the ancient world. It was said to have been founded by Pelasgians from Thessaly, according to tradition at the coming of the Argonauts; later, allegedly in 756 B.C., it received many colonists from Miletus. Owing to its advantageous position it speedily acquired commercial importance, and the gold staters of Cyzicus were a staple currency in the ancient world till they were superseded by those of Philip of Macedon. The site of Cyzicus, located on the Erdek and Bandirma roads, is protected by Turkey's Ministry of Culture.
SH84459. Electrum hekte, SNG BnF 241; SNGvA 1180; BMC Mysia p. 32, 98; Von Fritze I 102; Rosen 482; de Luynes pl. XCII 2460; SNG Cop -, gVF, well centered and struck on a tight flan, weight 2.628 g, maximum diameter 10.8 mm, Kyzikos (Kapu Dagh, Turkey) mint, c. 500 - 450 B.C.; obverse forepart of a winged deer left, tunny fish diagonal with head down behind; reverse quadripartite incuse square; rare; SOLD


Thourioi, Lucania, Italy, 443 - 400 B.C.

|Italy|, |Thourioi,| |Lucania,| |Italy,| |443| |-| |400| |B.C.|, |stater|
Nearly 70 years after Sybaris was destroyed by the Crotoniats, a new colony was founded on the site on the Gulf of Taranto. Soon after, on the advice of an oracle, the settlers moved a short distance away near a fountain named Thuria, after which the new city was named. This obverse die is one of the most beautiful of this series.
SH08279. Silver stater, SNG Cop 1405, SGCV I 435, EF, weight 7.91 g, maximum diameter 20.7 mm, die axis 0o, Thourioi (near Sibari, Cosenza, Calabria, Italy) mint, 443 - 400 B.C.; obverse head of Athena right, wearing Attic helmet decorated with olive wreath; reverse ΘOYPIΩN, thickset, short legged bull right, head in profile, just beginning to charge, fish in exergue; fine style, high relief, beautiful toning with rainbow colors; SOLD


Kyzikos, Mysia, Mid 3rd Century B.C., Restoration of Lysimachos' Type, Portrait of Alexander the Great

|Cyzicus|, |Kyzikos,| |Mysia,| |Mid| |3rd| |Century| |B.C.,| |Restoration| |of| |Lysimachos'| |Type,| |Portrait| |of| |Alexander| |the| |Great|, |tetradrachm|
Kyzikos' powerful neighbor was the Pergamene Kingdom, founded by Philetaerus after he deserted Lysimachus in 282 B.C. Soon after, Philetaerus aided Cyzicus with troops, money and food to repel invading Gauls. Yet, only a few decades later, this coin was issued in the name of Lysimachus, probably to indicate the city's independence from Pergamon.
SH90218. Silver tetradrachm, Not in references; see SNG BnF 2523 - 2524 and Mesopotamia Hoard 39 for obverse dies with the same unusual style unique to an engraver at Kyzikos, gVF, light marks and scratches, weight 16.994 g, maximum diameter 33.2 mm, die axis 0o, Kyzikos (Kapu Dagh, Turkey) mint, Middle 3rd century B.C.; obverse diademed head of the deified Alexander right, with horn of Ammon; reverse Athena Nikephoros seated left, victory in right crowning king's name, left arm resting on shield, transverse spear against far side, ATP monogram to inner left, fish hook(?) in exergue; ex CNG auction 324, lot 91; possibly unique; SOLD


Thourioi, Lucania, Italy, c. 400 - 350 B.C.

|Italy|, |Thourioi,| |Lucania,| |Italy,| |c.| |400| |-| |350| |B.C.|, |nomos|
A superb example from the period when Thourioi's (Latin: Thurium) coinage reached its highest point of excellence in execution. The head of Athena is probably that of the sea-goddess Athena Skyletria. The bull may be a symbol of Dionysos or may have been derived from the archaic coins of Sybaris and symbolize the river Krathis. A more romantic view is that the butting bull symbolizes the rushing waters of the fountain Thuria from which the city took its name.
SH46910. Silver nomos, SNG Cop 1458 var. (stones not apparent); Pozzi -, gVF, beautiful style, toned, weight 7.716 g, maximum diameter 20.8 mm, die axis 90o, Thourioi (near Sibari, Cosenza, Calabria, Italy) mint, c. 400 - 350 B.C.; obverse head of Athena right, wearing crested Attic helmet decorated with Skylla scanning and inscribed ΣΩ; reverse ΘOYPIΩN / ΣΩ, bull butting right, stones on exergual line, fish right in exergue; nice style, toned, tight flan; SOLD


Thourioi, Lucania, Italy, 4th Century B.C.

|Italy|, |Thourioi,| |Lucania,| |Italy,| |4th| |Century| |B.C.|, |nomos|
Thourioi, also called Thurii and Thurium, issued similar types with a hippocamp, griffin or laurel wreath on the Attic helmet. On those ornamented with Scylla, she is sometimes shading her eyes and scanning the horizon, holding a trident, spear, oar or octopus, or hurling a stone or a spear.
SH58669. Silver nomos, cf. SNG ANS 1007 (holding spear, same rev die as our coin), SNG Ashmolean 958 (holding spear), HN Italy 1802 (refs Oxford), VF, punches on reverse, weight 7.646 g, maximum diameter 20.0 mm, die axis 225o, Thourioi (near Sibari, Cosenza, Calabria, Italy) mint, 4th century B.C.; obverse head of Athena right, wearing Attic helmet decorated with Skylla pointing; reverse ΘOYPIΩN, Bull butting right, tunny fish in exergue; SOLD


Kyzikos, Mysia, 600 - 550 B.C.

|Cyzicus|, |Kyzikos,| |Mysia,| |600| |-| |550| |B.C.|, |hemihekte|
Kyzikos was founded around 675 by Milesian colonists on the south coast of the Propontis (now Marmara Sea), halfway between the Dardanelles and the Bosporus. The location was ideal for tuna fishing. Schools of tuna passed every spring to enter the Marmara Sea to spawn; schools passed in the fall going back to the Mediterranean. In the archaic period, the tuna catch was the main source of income for the city. In the 5th and 4th centuries, Kyzikos had an important role in trade between the Black Sea and Greece, especially in grain trade from the southern Russian region, which supplied the growing needs of Athens.
SH89445. Electrum hemihekte, Hurter-Liewald III 5.2; SNGvA 7255 (fish above off flan); cf. BMC Mysia p. 18, 2 (hekte); SNG Cop -; SNG BnF -, gVF, well centered and struck, scratches, light earthen deposits, many small edge cracks, weight 1.299 g, maximum diameter 8.7 mm, Kyzikos (Kapu Dagh, Turkey) mint, 600 - 550 B.C.; obverse head of tuna fish left, two pellets right, smaller tuna fish right above; reverse irregular quadripartite incuse square; extremely rare; SOLD


Kyzikos, Mysia, 600 - 550 B.C.

|Cyzicus|, |Kyzikos,| |Mysia,| |600| |-| |550| |B.C.|, |hemihekte|
SH76835. Electrum hemihekte, Hurter-Liewald III 14.1, SNGvA 7263, SNG Cop 35, VF, flan crack, weight 1.266 g, maximum diameter 8.3 mm, Kyzikos (Kapu Dagh, Turkey) mint, 600 - 550 B.C.; obverse tunny fish head right, headless tunny fish body above and another below; reverse quadripartite incuse irregular square with rounded corners; very rare; SOLD


Kyzikos, Mysia, 5th - 4th Century B.C.

|Cyzicus|, |Kyzikos,| |Mysia,| |5th| |-| |4th| |Century| |B.C.|, |hekte|
The kithara (cithara) was an ancient stringed musical instrument resembling the lyre. The lyre was a simpler folk-instrument with two strings and tortoise shell body. The kithara had seven strings and a flat back. The kithara is a symbol of Apollo and he is credited with inventing it. Its true origins were likely Asiatic.. The kithara was primarily used by professional musicians, called kitharodes. In modern Greek, the word kithara has come to mean "guitar."
SH70830. Electrum hekte, Hurter-Liewald II 181; cf. Von Fritze I 181 (stater); SNG BnF 325 (1/12 Stater), F, weight 2.519 g, maximum diameter 10.8 mm, die axis 0o, Kyzikos (Kapu Dagh, Turkey) mint, 5th - 4th century B.C.; obverse Kithara, tunny right below; reverse quadripartite mill-sail incuse square; ex CNG Auctions 287 lot 106; very rare; SOLD


Akragas, Sicily, c. 420 - 406 B.C.

|Akragas|, |Akragas,| |Sicily,| |c.| |420| |-| |406| |B.C.|, |hemilitron|
On similar common types, the eagle is right, sometimes devouring the fish, and on the reverse the positions of octopus and conch are switched. This particular type with the eagle screaming left and the octopus to the left the conch is missing from all the references examined (Calciati, HGC 2, SNG ANS, SNG Cop, SNG Munchen, SNG Tubingen, SNG Lloyd, BMC Sicily, McClean, Weber, et al.). This coin is the only example on Coin Archives (the Savoca auction).
GB86317. Bronze hemilitron, apparently unpublished; Calciati 47 var. (conch to left); HGC 2 135 (R1) corr. (same obv. die but text says eagle right) var. (conch to left), VF, well centered, some porosity, reverse slightly rough, weight 21.219 g, maximum diameter 27.9 mm, die axis 90o, Akragas (Agrigento, Sicily, Italy) mint, c. 420 - 406 B.C.; obverse AKP-AΓANTIN-ON, eagle standing left on fish, raising head up screaming, wings open; reverse crab from above, eel in right claw, octopus to left of conch shell below, six pellets around; ex Savoca Numismatik, auction 4 (30 Aug 2015), lot 176; extremely rare variety; SOLD




  




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