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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Featured Collections| ▸ |Maxwell Hunt Collection||View Options:  |  |  |   

The Maxwell Hunt Collection

Maxwell Edward Hunt of Loudon, Tennessee, passed away 27 Aug 2008, at the age of 85. Max was a U.S. Marine Corps veteran of WW II and active in the Covenant Baptist Church. A former resident of Detroit, Michigan, he retired from RCA Service Company in 1984 and moved to Tennessee in 1988. Max was an avid genealogist and a member of the Society of Mayflower Descendants, a sponsor of the Plimoth Plantation and a member of the Clan MacRae Society of North America. Reflecting his faith, the Maxwell Hunt Collection includes many Biblical related coins.


Julius Caesar, Imperator and Dictator, October 49 - 15 March 44 B.C.

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In Feb 44 B.C. the senate named Julius Caesar dictator for life. Fearing that he wished to become king, on the 15th of Mar, 63 senators assassinated him with their knives. His assassination plunged the Roman Republic into 17 years of civil war, after which it would re-emerge as the Roman Empire.
SH91678. Silver denarius, BMCRR Rome 4143 (also G); Crawford 480/3; RSC I 34; Sydenham 1056; Sear Imperators 100; SRCV I 1407; RBW 1678 var. (H) , Choice F, excellent portrait for the grade, well centered, dark old cabinet toning, banker's marks, scratches, lightly etched, weight 3.408 g, maximum diameter 17.8 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, moneyer M. Mettius, Jan - Feb 44 B.C.; obverse CAESARIMP, wreathed head of Caesar right, cymbium (boat shaped cup used as a wine ladle) and lituus (augural wand) behind; reverse M METTIVS, Venus standing left, Victory in her extended right hand, long transverse scepter in left hand, resting left elbow on shield which rests on globe, G (control letter) in lower left field; from the Maxwell Hunt Collection, ex Pegasi Coins; rare; SOLD


Julius Caesar, Imperator and Dictator, October 49 - 15 March 44 B.C.

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This type was a special military coinage produced by Caesar during his final campaign. This campaign against the Pompeian forces in Spain culminated in the battle of Munda on 17 March 45 B.C. The obverse refers to Caesar's mythical descent from the goddess Venus. The reverse refers to Caesar's victories in Gaul and the male Gaulish captive may be Vercingetorix.
RR91680. Silver denarius, Crawford 468/1, Sydenham 1014, RSC I 13, BMCRR Spain 89, Sear CRI 58, SRCV I 1404, gVF, old cabinet toning, reverse slightly off center, tiny edge crack, weight 3.934 g, maximum diameter 18.3 mm, die axis 180o, Spanish mint, 46 - 45 B.C.; obverse diademed head of Venus right, small Cupid behind; reverse trophy of Gallic arms; on left, Gallia seated left with hand to head in attitude of morning; on right, male (Vercingetorix?) captive seated right, hands bound behind, looking back and up; CAESAR in exergue; from the Maxwell Hunt Collection, ex Hesperia Art; SOLD


Julius Caesar, Imperator and Dictator, October 49 - 15 March 44 B.C.

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Minted after his invasion of Italy and crossing of the Rubicon on 10 January 49 B.C. until his defeat of Pompey at Pharsalus, this was the first coin type issued in Caesar's name. The elephant was the symbol of the Caesar family. According to legend, an ancestor received the name Caesar after single-handedly killing an elephant, probably in North Africa during the first Punic War, and "Caesai" was the name for elephant in the local Punic language. The obverse was long described as an elephant trampling a snake, symbolizing good triumphing over evil. For the Romans, however, the snake was a symbol of healing, not evil. The image to the right (click it to see a larger photo) is ornamentation on the side of the Gundestrup cauldron (c. 150 - 1 B.C.) depicting three Celtic warriors sounding their carnyx war trumpets. Clearly, Caesar's elephant is trampling a carnyx and the obverse symbolizes Caesar's victory over the Celtic tribes of Gaul. The reverse refers to Caesar's office of Pontifex Maximus, the high priest of Rome, a title now held by the Pope.Persian Empire
SH91682. Silver denarius, Crawford 443/1, Sydenham 1006, RSC I 49, Sear CRI 9, BMCRR Gaul 27, Russo RBW 1557, SRCV I 1399, Choice VF, well centered and struck on a broad flan, attractive old cabinet toning, weight 3.732 g, maximum diameter 20.2 mm, die axis 45o, military mint, traveling with Caesar, 49 B.C.; obverse elephant walking right trampling on a carnyx (a Celtic war trumpet) ornamented to look like a dragon, CAESAR below; reverse implements of the pontificate: culullus (cup) or simpulum (ladle), aspergillum (sprinkler), securis (sacrificial ax), and apex (priest's hat); from the Maxwell Hunt Collection, Hesperia Art; SOLD


Tiberius, 19 August 14 - 16 March 37 A.D., Tribute Penny of Matthew 22:20-21

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Jesus, referring to a "penny" asked, "Whose is this image and superscription?" When told it was Caesar, He said, ''Render therefore unto Caesar the things which are Caesar's and unto God the things that are God's" (Matthew 22:20-21). Since Tiberius was Caesar at the time, this denarius type is attributed by scholars as the "penny" referred to in the Bible.
SH91408. Silver denarius, Giard Lyon, group 4, 150; RIC I 30 (C); BMCRE I 48; RSC II 16a; SRCV I 1763, VF, attractive old collection toning, bumps and scratches, reverse a little off center, weight 3.641 g, maximum diameter 18.3 mm, die axis 150o, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, c. 18 - 35 A.D.; obverse TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS, laureate head right; reverse PONTIF MAXIM (high priest), Pax (or Livia as Pax) seated right on chair with decorated legs, a single line below, long scepter vertical behind in her right hand, branch in left hand, feet on footstool; from the Maxwell Hunt Collection; $700.00 (616.00) ON RESERVE


Macedonian Kingdom, Seleucus I Nikator as Satrap, 311 - 305 B.C., Babylon, Babylonia

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Seleukos (Seleucus) founded the Seleukid Empire and the Seleukid dynasty which ruled Syria until Pompey made it a Roman province in 63 B.C. Seleukos was never one of Alexander the Great's principal generals but he commanded the royal bodyguard during the Indian campaign. In the division of the empire after Alexander's death Seleukos did not receive a satrapy. Instead, he served under the regent Perdikkas until the latter's murder in 321 or 320. Seleukos was then appointed satrap of Babylonia. Five years later Antigonus Monophthalmus (the One-eyed) forced him to flee, but he returned with support from Ptolemy. He later added Persia and Media to his territory and defeated both Antigonus and Lysimachus. He was succeeded by his son Antiochus I.
GS91518. Silver stater, Houghton-Lorber 88.2a; Newell ESM 263; BMC Arabia p. 188, 43; Traite II, p. 487, 774; Weber 8202; HGC 9 67a , Choice F, well centered, old cabinet toning, light marks areas of light etching, tiny edge split, weight 13.518 g, maximum diameter 26.6 mm, die axis 90o, Mesopotamia, Babylon II (Hillah, Iraq) mint, c. 311 - 303 B.C.; obverse Baaltarz enthroned left on seat without back, himation over left shoulder and around hips and legs, lotus tipped scepter vertical before him in right hand, left hand rests on seat; reverse lion standing left, anchor (control symbol) above, nothing in exergue; from the Maxwell Hunt Collection, ex Hesperia Art; scarce; $780.00 SALE |PRICE| $700.00 ON RESERVE


Athens, Attica, Greece, c. 454 - 404 B.C., Old Style Tetradrachm

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The old-style tetradrachm of Athens is famous for its almond shaped eye, archaic smile, and charming owl reverse. Around 480 B.C. a wreath of olive leaves and a decorative scroll were added to Athena's helmet. On the reverse, a crescent moon was added.

During the period 449 - 413 B.C. huge quantities of tetradrachms were minted to finance grandiose building projects such as the Parthenon and to cover the costs of the Peloponnesian War.
GS91495. Silver tetradrachm, SNG Cop 31, SNG Mnchen 49, Kroll 8, Dewing 1611, Gulbenkian 519, HGC 4 1597, SGCV I 2526, EF, beautiful old collection toning, well centered on a tight flan, edge test cut, weight 17.032 g, maximum diameter 24.9 mm, die axis 270o, Athens mint, c. 454 - 404 B.C.; obverse head of Athena right, almond shaped eye, crested helmet with olive leaves and floral scroll, wire necklace, round earring, hair in parallel curves; reverse owl standing right, head facing, erect in posture, olive sprig and crescent left, AΘE downward on right, all within incuse square; from the Maxwell Hunt Collection; SOLD


Kingdom of Thrace, Lysimachos, 305 - 281 B.C., Portrait of Alexander the Great

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Lysimachus, one of Alexander the Great's personal bodyguards, was appointed strategos (general) in Thrace and the Chersonesos after Alexander's death. He became one of the diadochi (successors of Alexander) who were initially generals and governors, but who continuously allied and warred with each other and eventually divided the empire. In 309, he founded his capital Lysimachia in a commanding situation on the neck connecting the Chersonesos with the mainland. In 306, he followed the example of Antigonus in taking the title of king, ruling Thrace, Asia Minor and Macedonia. In 281, he was killed in battle against Seleucus, another successor of Alexander.
SH91466. Silver tetradrachm, Mller 552, Thompson 113; HGC 3.2 1750e, gVF, deep old cabinet toning, bold high relief, tight flan, weight 17.242 g, maximum diameter 28.8 mm, die axis 0o, Ionia, Magnesia ad Maeandrum (near Tekin, Turkey) mint, c. 297 - 281 B.C.; obverse diademed head of Alexander the Great wearing the horn of Ammon; reverse Athena Nikephoros enthroned left, Nike crowning name in extended right hand, left arm rests on grounded round shield decorated with Gorgoneion, transverse spear against right side, monogram inner left under arm, BAΣIΛEΩΣ downward on right, ΛYΣIMAXO downward on left; from the Maxwell Hunt Collection; SOLD


Vespasian, 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D., Judaea Capta

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On 14 April 70 A.D. Titus surrounded Jerusalem. He allowed pilgrims to enter to celebrate Passover but this was a trap to put pressure on supplies of food and water; he refused to allow them to leave. On 10 May he began his assault on the walls. The third wall fell on 25 May. The second wall fell on 30 May. On 20 July Titus stormed the Temple Mount. On 4 August 70 A.D. Titus destroyed the Temple. The Jewish fast of Tisha B'Av mourns the Fall of Jerusalem annually on this date.
SH91675. Silver denarius, RIC II-1 2; Hendin 1479; BMCRE II 35; RSC II 226; Hunter I 18; SRCV I 2296, Choice VF, nice portrait, deep old cabinet toning, well centered, light marks, tiny edge split, weight 3.020 g, maximum diameter 18.6 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 69 - 70 A.D.; obverse IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG, laureate head right; reverse mourning Jewess seated right, trophy of captured arms behind her, IVDAEA in exergue; ex Maxwell Hunt Collection; $600.00 (528.00) ON RESERVE


Mark Antony, Triumvir and Imperator, 44 - 30 B.C., LEG VI - Ferrata, the "Ironclad"

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The VI Ferrata, the "Ironclad," was an old legion of Caesar's that fought for Antony. It was retained by Augustus and later served in Syria and Judaea. The VI Victrix, on the other hand, was one of Octavian's legions. This Marcus Aurelius and Lucius Verus issued a 'restitution' of the type, presumably in connection with the latter's Eastern campaigns.
SH91681. Silver denarius, Crawford 544/19, Sydenham 1223, BMCRR II East 197, RSC I 33, Sear CRI 356, Choice VF, attractive old cabinet toning, well centered and struck, flow lines, a few bumps/scratches, weight 3.819 g, maximum diameter 18.4 mm, die axis 225o, Patrae(?) mint, 32 - 31 B.C.; obverse ANTAVG / III VIRRPC, galley right with rowers, mast with banners at prow; reverse LEG - VI, aquila (legionary eagle) between two legionary standards; from the Maxwell Hunt Collection; SOLD


Corinth, Corinthia, Greece, c. 345 - 307 B.C.

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Corinth is mentioned many times in the New Testament, largely in connection with Apostle Paul's mission there. Paul first visited the city in 51 or 52 and resided there for 18 months (Acts 18:1-18). Paul wrote at least two epistles to the Christian community, the First Epistle to the Corinthians (written from Ephesus) and the Second Epistle to the Corinthians (written from Macedonia).
GS91527. Silver stater, Pegasi I 402; BCD Korinth 115; BMC Corinth p. 22, 220; SNG Cop 57; Ravel 1040; HGC 4 1848, gVF, dark old cabinet toning, excellent centering, bumps and scratches, a few spots of corrosion, some die wear, weight 8.469 g, maximum diameter 20.8 mm, die axis 90o, Corinth mint, c. 345 - 307 B.C.; obverse Pegasos flying left, koppa below; reverse head of Athena (or Aphrodite) left wearing a plain Corinthian helmet over leather cap, A (control letter) before neck (off flan), Thessalian helmet (control symbol) behind; from the Maxwell Hunt Collection; SOLD




  




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Catalog current as of Friday, August 23, 2019.
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Maxwell Hunt