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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Greek Coins| ▸ |Geographic - All Periods| ▸ |Anatolia| ▸ |Mysia| ▸ |Other Mysia||View Options:  |  |  | 

Ancient Coins of Mysia (Other Cities and Uncertain Mints)

Mysia is the northwestern region of Anatolia (Asia Minor) located on the shore of the Propontis (Marmara Sea) between Troas and Bithynia. The chief physical features of Mysia are the two mountains, Mount Olympus at (7600 ft) in the north and Mount Temnus in the south. The most important cities were Pergamon in the valley of the Caïcus, and Cyzicus on the Propontis. The whole sea-coast was studded with Greek towns, several of which were places of considerable importance; thus the northern portion included Parium, Lampsacus and Abydos, and the southern Assos, Adramyttium. Further south, on the Eleatic Gulf, were Elaea, Myrina and Cyme.

Adramytion, Mysia, 2nd Century B.C.

|Other| |Mysia|, |Adramytion,| |Mysia,| |2nd| |Century| |B.C.||AE| |22|
Adramytteion was a coastal town northwest of Pergamon in Mysia, said to be founded by Adramys, brother of King Kroisos. In classical times, Adramyttium received settlers from Athens and Delos. It later belonged to the Roman province of Asia, whose capital was Ephesus. The ancient city with its harbor has entirely disappeared. Paul, while being taken as prisoner from Caesarea to Rome, embarked upon a ship belonging to Adramyttium (Acts 27:2). It conveyed him only to Myra, in Lycia, from which he sailed on an Alexandrian ship for Italy.
GB89047. Bronze AE 22, von Fritze Mysiens 32, SNG BnF 14, SNG Cop 4, BMC Mysia -, SNGvA -, VF, well centered, dark patina, earthen deposits, scratches, spots of light corrosion, weight 7.863 g, maximum diameter 21.5 mm, die axis 0o, Adramytion (Edremit, Turkey) mint, magistrate Nikolochos, 2nd century B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo left, hair tied at the back with two locks falling down neck, two A∆PAMYTHNΩN below; reverse cornucopia between two pilei (caps of the Dioskouroi) with stars above, NIKO-LO/XOY (magistrate) in two lines above and below caps, monogram lower right; ex Gerhard Rohde Ancient Coins; rare; $120.00 (€110.40)
 


Perperene, Mysia, 4th Century B.C.

|Other| |Mysia|, |Perperene,| |Mysia,| |4th| |Century| |B.C.||AE| |8|NEW
Perperene or Perperena was a city of ancient Mysia on the south-east of Adramyttium, in the neighborhood of which there were copper mines and good vineyards. It was said by some to be the place in which Thucydides had died. Stephanus of Byzantium calls the town Parparum or Parparon, but he writes that some called the place Perine. Ptolemy calls it Perpere or Permere. According to the Suda, Hellanicus of Lesbos, a 5th-century B.C. Greek logographer, died at Perperene at age 85. At a later date it was given the name Theodosiopolis or Theodosioupolis. It is located near Asagi Beykoy, on the Kozak plateau near Bergama in the Izmir province of Turkey in western Anatolia.
GA95888. Bronze AE 8, cf. SNG BnF 2309; SNG Cop 520; BMC Mysia p. 168, 2; SNG Tübingen -; Waddington - (none of the reference coins with this style or ethnic arrangement), F, dark patina, flatly struck centers, corrosion, weight 0.581 g, maximum diameter 8.1 mm, Perperene (near Bergama, Turkey) mint, 4th Century B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo right; reverse ΠEPΠE, grape bunch on vine; this is the very first coin of Perperene handled by FORVM; very rare; $100.00 (€92.00)
 


Gambrion, Mysia, 4th Century B.C.

|Other| |Mysia|, |Gambrion,| |Mysia,| |4th| |Century| |B.C.||AE| |9|
Gambrium (or Gambrion, Gambreium or Gambreion) was a town of ancient Aeolis and of Mysia, quite close to Pergamum. It is on a hill named Hisarlik in the Bakirçay valley and very close to modern town of Poyracik in Izmir province, Turkey. The name of Gambrion is seen first in the book of Anabasis of Xenophon which discusses the region in 399 B.C. At that time the ruler of the city was Gorgion and the earliest coins of the city bear his name. Gambrion peaked during the rule of the Pergamon Kingdom in the third and second centuries B.C.
GB96089. Bronze AE 9, von Fritze Mysiens, p. 142, 419; SNG BnF 938; SNG Cop 145; Waddington 777, VF, nice green patina, tight flan, obverse a little off center, weight 0.609 g, maximum diameter 8.9 mm, die axis 225o, Gambrion (Poyracik, Izmir, Turkey) mint, 4th century B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo left; reverse ΓA-M (counterclockwise from below - ), facing gorgoneion, neat hair, protruding tongue; very rare; $100.00 (€92.00)
 







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REFERENCES|

ANS Collections Database - http://numismatics.org/search/
Babelon, E. Traité des Monnaies Grecques et Romaines. (Paris, 1901-1932).
Barth, M & J. Stauber. "Die Münzen von Perperene" in EpAnat 23 (1994), pp. 59-82.
Burnett, A., M. Amandry, et al. Roman Provincial Coinage. (London, 1992 - ).
Davesne, A. & G. Le Rider. Gülnar II. Le trésor de Meydancikkale. (Paris, 1989).
Forrer, L. Descriptive Catalogue of the Collection of Greek Coins formed by Sir Hermann Weber, Vol. III. (London, 1926).
Grose, S. Catalogue of the McClean Collection of Greek Coins, Fitzwilliam Museum, Vol. III. (Cambridge, 1929).
Imhoof-Blumer, F. Kleinasiatische Münzen. (Vienna, 1901 - 1902).
Klein, D. Sammlung von griechischen Kleinsilbermünzen und Bronzen. Nomismata 3. (Milano, 1999).
Lindgren, H. & F. Kovacs. Ancient Bronze Coins of Asia Minor and the Levant. (San Mateo, 1985).
Lindgren, H. Lindgren III: Ancient Greek Bronze Coins. (Quarryville, 1993).
MacDonald, G. Catalogue of Greek Coins in the Hunterian Collection, University of Glasgow, Vol. II. (Glasgow, 1901).
Mildenberg, L. & S. Hurter, eds. The Dewing Collection of Greek Coins. ACNAC 6. (New York, 1985).
Mionnet, T. Description de Médailles antiques grecques et romaines. (Paris, 1807-1837).
Price, M. & N. Waggoner. Archaic Greek Silver Coinage, The "Asyut" Hoard. (London, 1975).
RPC Online - http://rpc.ashmus.ox.ac.uk/coins/
Sear, D. Greek Coins and Their Values, Vol. 2: Asia and Africa. (London, 1979).
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Stauber, J. Die Bucht von Adramytteion. (Bonn, 1996).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Denmark, The Royal Collection of Coins and Medals, Danish National Museum, Vol. 4: Bosporus - Lesbos. (West Milford, NJ, 1982).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Deutschland, Münzsammlung Universität Tübingen, Part 4: Mysien - Ionien. (Berlin, 1989).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Deutschland, Sammlung Hans Von Aulock, Vol. 1: Pontus, Paphlagonia, Bithynia, Mysia, Troas, Aiolis, Lesbos, Ionia. (Berlin, 1957).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, France, Bibliothèque Nationale, Cabinet des Médailles, Vol. 5: Mysia. (Paris, 2001).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, France, Bibliothèque National, Collection Jean et Marie Delepierre. (Paris, 1983).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain IV, Fitzwilliam Museum, Leake and General Collections, Part 6: Asia Minor: Pontus - Phrygia. (London, 1965).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain V, Ashmolean Museum, Oxford. (London. 1951 - 2008).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain VI, Corpus Christi College Cambridge, The Lewis Collection. (Oxford, 1972 - 1992).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain XII, The Hunterian Museum, Univ. of Glasgow. (Oxford, 2004).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Greece 2. The Alpha Bank Collection. Macedonia I: Alexander I - Perseus. (Athens, 2000).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Turkey 1: The Muharrem Kayhan Collection. (Istanbul, 2002).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Turkey 3: Canakkale Museum, Vol. 1, Roman Provincial Coins of Mysia, Troas, etc. (Istanbul, 2009).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, United States, Burton Y. Berry Collection, Part 2. Megaris to Egypt. (New York, 1962).
Troxell, H. "Orontes, satrap of Mysia?" in SNR 60 (1981).
von Fritze, H. Die antiken Münzen Mysiens, Die antiken Münzen Nord-Griechenlands Vol. IV. (Berlin, 1913).
Wroth, W. A Catalog of the Greek Coins in the British Museum, Mysia. (London, 1892).

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