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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Greek Coins| ▸ |Geographic - All Periods| ▸ |Anatolia| ▸ |Mysia| ▸ |Lampsakos||View Options:  |  |  | 

Ancient Coins of Lampsakos, Mysia

Lampsakos was founded by Greek colonists from Phocaea in the 6th century B.C. Soon afterward it became a main competitor of Miletus, controlling the trade roots in the Dardanelles. During the 6th and 5th centuries B.C., Lampsacus was successively dominated by Lydia, Persia, Athens, and Sparta. Artaxerxes I assigned it to Themistocles with the expectation that the city supply the Persian king with its famous wine. When Lampsacus joined the Delian League after the battle of Mycale in 479 B.C., it paid a tribute of twelve talents, a testimony to its wealth. Lampsacus was notable for its worship of Priapus, who was said to have been born there.

Macedonian Kingdom, Antigonos I Monophthalmos, 323 - 301 B.C., In the Name and Types of Alexander the Great

|Macedonian| |Kingdom|, |Macedonian| |Kingdom,| |Antigonos| |I| |Monophthalmos,| |323| |-| |301| |B.C.,| |In| |the| |Name| |and| |Types| |of| |Alexander| |the| |Great|, |drachm|
Struck by Antigonos I Monophthalmos ("the One-eyed") as strategos of Asia (320 - 306 B.C.) or as king (306 - 301 B.C.). Antigonos I was a nobleman, general, and governor under Alexander the Great. Upon Alexander's death in 323 B.C., he established himself as one of the successors and declared himself King in 306 B.C. The most powerful satraps of the empire, Cassander, Seleucus, Ptolemy, and Lysimachus, answered by also proclaiming themselves kings. Antigonus found himself at war with all four, largely because his territory shared borders with all of them. He died in battle at Ipsus in 301 B.C. Antigonus' kingdom was divided up, with Seleucus I Nicator gaining the most. His son, Demetrius I Poliorcetes, took Macedon, which the family held, off and on, until it was conquered by Rome in 168 B.C.
SL76591. Silver drachm, Price 1418, Müller Alexander, SNG Cop, SNG Munchen, SNG Alpha Bank, NGC Ch XF, strike 4/5, surface 3/5 (2490386-003), weight 4.140 g, maximum diameter 17.9 mm, die axis 270o, Mysia, Lampsakos (Lapseki, Turkey) mint, 310 - 301 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean Lion skin, scalp over head, forepaws tied at neck; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus Aëtophoros seated left, nude to waist, right leg drawn back, himation around waist and legs, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left, amphora in left field, Θ under throne; struck by Antigonus I Monophthalmus ("the One-eyed") as strategos of Asia (320 - 306 B.C.) or as king (306 - 301 B.C.); NGC| Lookup; $300.00 SALE |PRICE| $270.00
 


Macedonian Kingdom, Antigonus I Monophthalmus, 323 - 301 B.C., In the Name of Alexander the Great

|Macedonian| |Kingdom|, |Macedonian| |Kingdom,| |Antigonus| |I| |Monophthalmus,| |323| |-| |301| |B.C.,| |In| |the| |Name| |of| |Alexander| |the| |Great|, |drachm|
Antigonos I Monophthalmos ("the One-eyed") (strategos of Asia, 320 - 306/5 B.C., king, 306/5 - 301 B.C.) was a nobleman, general, and governor under Alexander the Great. Upon Alexander's death in 323 B.C., he established himself as one of the successors and declared himself King in 306 B.C. The most powerful satraps of the empire, Cassander, Seleucus, Ptolemy, and Lysimachus, answered by also proclaiming themselves kings. Antigonus found himself at war with all four, largely because his territory shared borders with all of them. He died in battle at Ipsus in 301 B.C. Antigonus' kingdom was divided up, with Seleucus I Nicator gaining the most. His son, Demetrius I Poliorcetes, took Macedon, which the family held, off and on, until it was conquered by Rome in 168 B.C. -- Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
SL21985. Silver drachm, Price 1406, Müller Alexander 821, SNG Cop 988, SNG Alpha Bank 586, SNG Munchen 458, SNG Saroglos 710, Ch VF, strike 4/5, surface 4/5 (flan flaw, 5768432-004), weight 4.117 g, maximum diameter 16.9 mm, die axis 180o, Mysia, Lampsakos (Lapseki, Turkey) mint, c. 310 - 301 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean Lion skin, scalp over head, forepaws tied at neck; reverse Zeus Aëtophoros seated left on throne without back, nude to the waist, himation around hips and legs, right leg drawn back, eagle in extended right hand, lotus tipped long scepter vertical in left hand, AΛEΞAN∆POY downward behind, KI (control) left, ME monogram (control) under throne; ex FORVM (2009), NGC| Lookup; $280.00 SALE |PRICE| $252.00
 


Lampsakos, Mysia, 394 - 330 B.C.

|Lampsakos|, |Lampsakos,| |Mysia,| |394| |-| |330| |B.C.|, |trihemiobol|
Lampsakos was founded by Greek colonists from Phocaea in the 6th century B.C. Soon afterward it became a main competitor of Miletus, controlling the trade roots in the Dardanelles. During the 6th and 5th centuries B.C., Lampsacus was successively dominated by Lydia, Persia, Athens, and Sparta. Artaxerxes I assigned it to Themistocles with the expectation that the city supply the Persian king with its famous wine. When Lampsacus joined the Delian League after the battle of Mycale in 479 B.C., it paid a tribute of twelve talents, a testimony to its wealth.
GB88954. Silver trihemiobol, SNG Cop 196, Baldwin Lampsakos 36 ff. var., SNG Delepierre 2525 var., BMC Mysia 49 var., Dewing 2199 var., SNGvA 1296 var. (control varieties), aVF, dark toning, bumps and marks, high points flat, weight 1.123 g, maximum diameter 11.8 mm, die axis 180o, Lampsakos (Lapseki, Turkey) mint, 394 - 330 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo right; reverse forepart of Pegasos flying right, curved archaic style wing, Λ-A-M around above, star (control symbol) below; ex Dmitry Markov Coins & Medals; $165.00 SALE |PRICE| $149.00
 


Lampsacus, Mysia, 360 - 340 B.C.

|Lampsakos|, |Lampsacus,| |Mysia,| |360| |-| |340| |B.C.|, |chalkous|
Recent hoard and coin finds prompted Ashton to reattribute this type to the Troad, probably Lampsakos (Ashton Memnon, NC 162 (2002), pp. 11-15). Ashton suggests ME refers to Memnon of Rhodes, that these coins were struck at Lampsakos when he controlled the city and similar coins inscribed EY and NI possibly refer to Memnon's subordinates. Memnon of Rhodes was a prominent Greek commander in the service of the Persian Achaemenid Empire. Related by marriage to the Persian aristocracy, he served the Persian king for most of his life. Memnon was arguably the toughest defender to challenge Alexander and was nearly successful in putting a halt to his advance.
GB86134. Bronze chalkous, Ashton Memnon 2 (A1/P2); Ashton Solar p. 30, 1; BMC Caria p. 221, 4; SNG Cop (Caria) 914; Waddington 2813; Traité II 1733, VF, green patina, tight flan, earthen deposits, areas of light corrosion, weight 0.708 g, maximum diameter 8.9 mm, die axis 180o, Lampsakos (Lapseki, Turkey) mint, under Memnon of Rhodes, c. 360 - 340 B.C.; obverse radiate youthful head of Helios right; reverse rose in profile, M-E flanking low across field; very rare; $120.00 SALE |PRICE| $108.00
 


Macedonian Kingdom, Antigonus I Monophthalmus, 323 - 301 B.C., In the Name of Alexander the Great

|Members| |Auction| |Listed|, |Macedonian| |Kingdom,| |Antigonus| |I| |Monophthalmus,| |323| |-| |301| |B.C.,| |In| |the| |Name| |of| |Alexander| |the| |Great|, |drachm|
Herakles is most often depicted on coinage wearing the scalp of the Nemean lion over his head. The first of Herakles' twelve labors, set by his cousin King Eurystheus, was to slay the Nemean lion and bring back its skin. Herakles discovered arrows and his club were useless against it because its golden fur was impervious to mortal weapons. Its claws were sharper than swords and could cut through any armor. Herakles stunned the beast with his club and, using his immense strength, strangled it to death. During the fight, the lion bit off one of his fingers. After slaying the lion, he tried to skin it with a knife from his belt but failed. Wise Athena, noticing the hero's plight, told him to use one of the lion's own claws to skin the pelt.
MA95165. Silver drachm, Price 1398, Müller Alexander 823, SNG Cop 990, SNG Munchen 455, AMD II series X, VF, a little rough, edge cracks, weight 4.001 g, maximum diameter 17.2 mm, die axis 315o, Mysia, Lampsakos (Lapseki, Turkey) mint, c. 310 - 301 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean Lion skin, scalp over head, forepaws tied at neck; reverse Zeus Aëtophoros seated left on backless throne, nude to the waist, himation around hips and legs, right leg drawn back, eagle in extended right hand, lotus tipped long scepter vertical in left hand, AΛEΞAN∆POY downward on right , KI in left field, No monogram under throne; $63.00 (€57.96)


Lampsakos, Mysia, 190 - 85 B.C.

|Lampsakos|, |Lampsakos,| |Mysia,| |190| |-| |85| |B.C.|, |AE| |13|
Lampsakos was founded by Greek colonists from Phocaea in the 6th century B.C. Soon afterward it became a main competitor of Miletus, controlling the trade roots in the Dardanelles. During the 6th and 5th centuries B.C., Lampsacus was successively dominated by Lydia, Persia, Athens, and Sparta. Artaxerxes I assigned it to Themistocles with the expectation that the city supply the Persian king with its famous wine. When Lampsacus joined the Delian League after the battle of Mycale in 479 B.C., it paid a tribute of twelve talents, a testimony to its wealth.
GB93077. Bronze AE 13, SNG BnF 1243 corr. (fulmen described as a torch); SNG Cop 222; BMC Mysia p. 87, 74; SNGvA -, F, green patina, buff earthen deposits, tight flan, weight 2.530 g, maximum diameter 13.4 mm, die axis 180o, Lampsakos (Lapseki, Turkey) mint, 190 - 85 B.C.; obverse head of Demeter right, veiled and wreathed with grain; reverse fulmen (thunderbolt), ΛAM above, forepart of Pegasos right below; scarce; $40.00 SALE |PRICE| $36.00
 


The Electrum Coinage of Lampsakos

|Greek| |Books|, |The| |Electrum| |Coinage| |of| |Lampsakos|,
 
BL20304. The Electrum Coinage of Lampsakos by Agnes Baldwin, American Numismatic Society, New York, 1915, softcover, age cover wear and tears, 34 pages, 2 plates, used working copy; $20.00 SALE |PRICE| $18.00
 







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REFERENCES|

ANS Collections Database - http://numismatics.org/search/
Baldwin, A. Lampsakos: The Gold Staters, Silver and Bronze Coinages. AJN 53. (1924).
Burnett, A., M. Amandry, et al. Roman Provincial Coinage. (London, 1992 - ).
Forrer, L. Descriptive Catalogue of the Collection of Greek Coins formed by Sir Hermann Weber, Vol. III, Part 1. (London, 1926).
Gaebler, H. Die antiken Münzen von Makedonia und Paionia, Die antiken Münzen Nord-Griechenlands Vol. III. (Berlin, 1935).
Hoover, O. Handbook of Syrian Coins, Royal and Civic Issues, Fourth to First Centuries BC. HGC 9. (Lancaster, PA, 2009).
Houghton, A., C. Lorber & O. Hoover. Seleucid Coins: A Comprehensive Catalog. (Lancaster, 2002 - 2008).
Müller, L. Die Münzen Des Thracishen Konigs Lysimacus. (Copenhagen, 1858).
Müller, L. Numismatique d'Alexandre le Grand; Appendice les monnaies de Philippe II et III, et Lysimaque. (Copenhagen, 1855-58).
Price, M. The Coinage in the name of Alexander the Great and Philip Arrhidaeus. (Zurich-London, 1991).
von Prokesh-Osten, A. "Liste des Alexandres de ma collection qui ne se trouvent pas dans le catalogue de Mr. L. Müller" in NZ 1 (Constantinople, 1869). pp. 31 - 64.
RPC Online - http://rpc.ashmus.ox.ac.uk/coins/
Sear, D. Greek Coins and Their Values, Vol. 2: Asia and Africa. (London, 1979).
Sear, D. Greek Imperial Coins and Their Values. (London, 1982).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Denmark, The Royal Collection of Coins and Medals, Danish National Museum, Vol. 4: Bosporus-Lesbos. (West Milford, NJ, 1982).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Deutschland, Münzsammlung Universität Tübingen, Part 4: Mysien-Ionien. (Berlin, 1989).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Deutschland, Sammlung Hans Von Aulock, Vol. 1: Pontus, Paphlagonia, Bithynia, Mysia, Troas, Aiolis, Lesbos, Ionia. (Berlin, 1957).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, France, Bibliothèque Nationale, Cabinet des Médailles, Vol. 5: Mysia. (Paris, 2001).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, France, Bibliothèque National, Collection Jean et Marie Delepierre. (Paris, 1983).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain IV, Fitzwilliam Museum, Leake and General Collections, Part 6: Asia Minor: Pontus - Phrygia. (London, 1965).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain V, Ashmolean Museum, Oxford. (London. 1951 - 2008).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain XII, The Hunterian Museum, Univ. of Glasgow, Part 1: Roman Provincial Coins: Spain-Kingdoms of Asia Minor. (Oxford, 2004).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Greece 2. The Alpha Bank Collection. Macedonia I: Alexander I - Perseus. (Athens, 2000).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Turkey 1: The Muharrem Kayhan Collection. (Istanbul, 2002).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, United States, Burton Y. Berry Collection, Part 2. Megaris to Egypt. (New York, 1962).
Thompson, M. Alexander's Drachm Mints II: Lampsacus and Abydus. ANSNS 19 (1991).
Thompson, M. "The Mints of Lysimachus" in Essays Robinson, pp. 163 - 182, pls. 16 - 22.
Thompson, M., & A. Bellinger. Greek Coins in the Yale Collection, IV: A Hoard of Alexander Drachms. Yale Classical Studies 14. (1955).
Waggoner, N. Early Greek Coins from the Collection of Jonathan P. Rosen. ACNAC 5. (New York, 1983).
Wroth, W. A Catalog of the Greek Coins in the British Museum, Mysia. (London, 1892).

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