Coins and Antiquities Consignment Shop
  STORE WIDE SALE!!! 10% OFF EVERYTHING!!! WE ARE OPEN AND SHIPPING!!! We Are Working From Home, Social Distancing, Wearing Masks, And Sanitizing To Pack Orders!!! Please Call Us If You Have Questions 252-646-1958 Expert Authentication - Accurate Descriptions - Reasonable Prices - Coins From Under $10 To Museum Quality Rarities STORE WIDE SALE!!! 10% OFF EVERYTHING!!! WE ARE OPEN AND SHIPPING!!! We Are Working From Home, Social Distancing, Wearing Masks, And Sanitizing To Pack Orders!!! Please Call Us If You Have Questions 252-646-1958 Explore Our Website And Find Joy In The History, Numismatics, Art, Mythology, And Geography Of Coins!!!

×Catalog Main Menu
Fine Coins Showcase

Antiquities Showcase
Recent Additions
Recent Price Reductions

Show Empty Categories
Shop Search
Shopping Cart
My FORVM
Contact Us
About Forum
Shopping at Forum
Our Guarantee
Payment Options
Shipping Options & Fees
Privacy & Security
Forum Staff
Selling Your Coins
Identifying Your Coin
FAQs
zoom.asp
   View Categories
Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Personifications| ▸ |Roma||View Options:  |  |  | 

Roma on Ancient Coins

Roma was a female deity who personified the city of Rome and more broadly, the Roman state. The earliest certain cult to dea Roma was established at Smyrna in 195 B.C., probably to mark the successful alliance against Antiochus III. In 30/29 B.C., the Koinon of Asia and Bithynia requested permission to honor Augustus as a living god. "Republican" Rome despised the worship of a living man, but an outright refusal might offend their loyal allies. A cautious formula was drawn up, non-Romans could only establish a cult for divus Augustus jointly with dea Roma. In the city of Rome itself, the earliest known state cult to dea Roma was combined with Venus at the Hadrianic Temple of Venus and Roma. This was the largest temple in the city, probably dedicated to inaugurate the reformed festival of Parilia, which was known thereafter as the Romaea after the Eastern festival in Roma's honor. The temple contained the seated, Hellenised image of dea Roma with a Palladium in her right hand to symbolize Rome's eternity.

Roman Republic, Libral Cast Series, c. 225 - 217 B.C.

|before| |150| |B.C.|, |Roman| |Republic,| |Libral| |Cast| |Series,| |c.| |225| |-| |217| |B.C.||uncia|
The prow right aes grave are common in the as to sextans denominations, but scarce for uncia. This issue was followed by the prow left series, which has no uncia.
RR95368. Aes grave (cast) uncia, Crawford 35/6; Sydenham 77; Haeberlin pl. 18, 22 ff.; Thurlow-Vecchi 56; Vecchi ICC 83; HN Italy 342; RBW Collection 90, SRCV I 589, VF, dark brown patina, weight 27.834 g, maximum diameter 27.1 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, c. 225 - 217 B.C.; obverse head of Roma left, wearing a crested Attic helmet, • (mark of value) behind; reverse prow of galley right; • (mark of value) below; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $450.00 SALE |PRICE| $405.00
 


Gordian III, 29 July 238 - 25 February 244 A.D.

|Gordian| |III|, |Gordian| |III,| |29| |July| |238| |-| |25| |February| |244| |A.D.||sestertius|
To the ancient Romans, Rome was "Roma Aeterna" (The Eternal City) and "Caput Mundi" (Capital of the World). The empire is history but Rome is still today, the eternal city. Rome's influence on Western Civilization can hardly be overestimated; perhaps a greater influence than any other city on earth, making important contributions to politics, literature, culture, the arts, architecture, music, religion, education, fashion, cinema and cuisine.
RB92624. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC IV-1 RIC 272a, Cohen V 316, Hunter III 91, SRCV III 8736, gVF, excellent portrait, green patina, tight slightly irregularly shaped flan, slight double strike, spots of light corrosion, light marks, weight 18.352 g, maximum diameter 30.3 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 240 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES M ANT GORDIANVS AVG, laureate draped and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse ROMAE AETERNAE (to eternal Rome), Roma seated left on shield (throne back also visible in background) holding Victory on globe and scepter, S C (senatus consulto) in exergue; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $170.00 SALE |PRICE| $153.00
 


Geto-Dacian, Roman Republic Imitative, 154 B.C. - 1st Century A.D.

|Unofficial| |&| |Barbaric|, |Geto-Dacian,| |Roman| |Republic| |Imitative,| |154| |B.C.| |-| |1st| |Century| |A.D.||denarius|NEW
The Dacians had a well-established affinity for Republican denarii, used them in enormous numbers, and also minted numerous imitations. Many Roman Republic imitative types, such as this type, are found in Dacia, and nowhere else. Some Dacian imitatives were quite faithful reproductions of the Roman Republic originals. Others, such as this coin, maintain the types but deviate in style. Other Dacian imitatives markedly diverge from their Republican prototypes with more or less fanciful, stylized or "barbarous" designs, often with mismatched obverse and reverse types and blundered legends. -- Phil Davis' website, "Imitations of Roman Republican Denarii" - https://rrimitations.ancients.info/
RR95316. Silver denarius, Davis -; cf. official prototype Rome mint, 154 B.C., C. Iuventius Thalna, Sydenham 379, RBW 869, Crawford 202/1a, VF, slightly crude unofficial style, light toning, tight flan, flow lines, weight 3.699 g, maximum diameter 17.5 mm, die axis 270o, unofficial Geto-Dacian mint, 154 BC - 1st Century A.D.; obverse helmeted head of Roma right; behind, X.; reverse Victory in biga right; below, C TAL; in exergue, ROMA; $130.00 SALE |PRICE| $117.00
 


Gallienus, August 253 - September 268 A.D.

|Gallienus|, |Gallienus,| |August| |253| |-| |September| |268| |A.D.||antoninianus|
To the ancient Romans, Rome was "Roma Aeterna" (The Eternal City) and "Caput Mundi" (Capital of the World). The empire is history but Rome is still today, the eternal city. Rome's influence on Western Civilization can hardly be overestimated; perhaps a greater influence than any other city on earth, making important contributions to politics, literature, culture, the arts, architecture, music, religion, education, fashion, cinema and cuisine.
RA94169. Billon antoninianus, Göbl MIR 1613e, RIC V-1 654, RSC IV 920, SRCV III 10343 var. (obv. legend, star position), F, well centered, dark brown patina with highlighting earthen deposits, scratches and marks, weight 2.550 g, maximum diameter 21.0 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 260 - 268 A.D.; obverse GALLIENVS P F AVG, radiate and cuirassed bust right, seen from the front; reverse ROMAE AETERNAE (to eternal Rome), Roma seated left, wearing crested helmet, grounded shield at side, Victory in right hand, vertical spear behind in left hand, star upper left; $36.00 SALE |PRICE| $32.00
 







CLICK HERE TO SEE MORE FROM THIS CATEGORY - FORVM's PRIOR SALES



Catalog current as of Sunday, October 25, 2020.
Page created in 0.547 seconds.
All coins are guaranteed for eternity