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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Themes & Provenance ▸ Gods, Non-Olympian ▸ ThanatosView Options:  |  |  |   

Thanatos

Thanatos (death) is sometimes identified as Eros (Cupid) or a generic winged Genius, but he holds an inverted torch representing a life extinguished. By the Severan Era, there was increased hope for an afterlife in pleasant Elysium than in dismal Hades. Thanatos was associated more with a gentle passing than a woeful demise. Thanatos as a winged boy, very much akin to Cupid, with crossed legs and an inverted torch, became the most common symbol for death, depicted on many Roman sarcophagi.


Commodus, March or April 177 - 31 December 192 A.D., Kallatis, Moesia Inferior

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SH12245. Bronze AE 19, Moushmov 267, BMC -, SNG Cop -, Lindgren -, SGICV -, aEF, weight 3.822 g, maximum diameter 19.4 mm, die axis 180o, Kallatis (Mangalia, Romania) mint, obverse AYK MAYKOMO∆OC, laureate and draped bust right; reverse KAΛΛATIANΩN, Thanatos (Death) leaning left on reversed torch; high grade and very attractive; very rare; SOLD


Geta, 209 - c. 26 December 211 A.D., Serdica, Thrace

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The figure on the reverse is sometimes identified as Eros (Cupid) or a generic winged Genius. The inverted torch represents a life extinguished, indicating the figure is Thanatos (death). By the Severan Era, there was increased hope for an afterlife in pleasant Elysium rather than in dismal Hades. Thanatos was associated more with a gentle passing than a woeful demise. Thanatos as a winged boy, very much akin to Cupid, with crossed legs and an inverted torch, became the most common symbol for death, depicted on many Roman sarcophagi.
RP85917. Bronze AE 18, Moushmov 4929, H-J Serdica 12.22.16.1 (R4) var. (rev. leg.), Varbanov III 2527 var. (same), SNG Cop -, SNG Hunterian -, BMC Thrace -, Lindgren -, VF, well centered and struck, dark patina, porous, small edge cracks, weight 3.415 g, maximum diameter 18.5 mm, die axis 225o, Serdica (Sofia, Bulgaria) mint, as caesar, c. 198 - 209 A.D.; obverse Λ CEΠT ΓETAC K, bare headed, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse OVΛΠI CEP∆IK, Thanatos standing half right, legs crossed, leaning on inverted extinguished torch set on altar; very rare variant; SOLD


Geta, 209 - c. 26 December 211 A.D., Marcianopolis, Moesia Inferior

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The figure on the reverse is sometimes identified as Eros (Cupid) or a generic winged Genius. The inverted torch represents a life extinguished, indicating the figure is Thanatos (death). By the Severan Era, there was increased hope for an afterlife in pleasant Elysium rather than in dismal Hades. Thanatos was associated more with a gentle passing than a woeful demise. Thanatos as a winged boy, very much akin to Cupid, with crossed legs and an inverted torch, became the most common symbol for death, depicted on many Roman sarcophagi.
RP64004. Bronze AE 17, Varbanov I 1110 (same dies), H-L Marcianopolis 6.22.16.3, AMNG I 699, Moushmov 512, VF, weight 3.205 g, maximum diameter 16.8 mm, die axis 180o, Markianopolis (Devnya, Bulgaria) mint, obverse Π CEΠTI ΓETAC K, draped bust right, from behind; reverse MAPKIANO−ΠOΛITΩN, Thanatos standing left, legs crossed, leaning on inverted extinguished torch set on altar; SOLD


Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D., Nikopolis ad Istrum, Moesia Inferior

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The figure on the reverse is sometimes identified as Eros (Cupid) or a generic winged Genius. The inverted torch represents a life extinguished, indicating the figure is Thanatos (death). By the Severan Era, there was increased hope for an afterlife in pleasant Elysium rather than in dismal Hades. Thanatos was associated more with a gentle passing than a woeful demise. Thanatos as a winged boy, very much akin to Cupid, with crossed legs and an inverted torch, became the most common symbol for death, depicted on many Roman sarcophagi.
RP69742. Bronze assarion, H-H-J Nikopolis 8.14.16.15/16 (unlisted die combination), cf. Varbanov I 2568 (legends), AMNG I/I 1367 (same), BMC Thrace -, SNG Cop -, VF, unusual style, weight 2.374 g, maximum diameter 16.3 mm, die axis 45o, Nicopolis ad Istrum (Nikyup, Bulgaria) mint, obverse AV KAI CEVPO, laureate bust right; reverse NIKOΠOΛITΩN ΠPOC I, winged Thanatos standing right, legs crossed legs, leaning on reversed torch on right; from the Butte College Foundation, ex Lindgren; rare variant; SOLD


Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D., Philippopolis, Thrace

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Philippopolis today is Plovdiv, Bulgaria.
RP37249. Bronze AE 19, cf. Varbanov III 1290 (described as Genius holding scepter and patera), aaF, weight 3.793 g, maximum diameter 19.0 mm, die axis 225o, Philippopolis (Plovdiv, Bulgaria) mint, obverse AV K Λ C CEVHPOC (or similar), laureate head right; reverse ΦIΛIΠΠOΠOΛITΩN, Thanatos advancing left holding torch in right; scarce; SOLD


Geta, 209 - c. 26 December 211 A.D., Marcianopolis, Moesia Inferior

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In Greek religion, Thnatos was the demon personification of Death. His Roman equivalent is Mors or Letus/Letum, and he is sometimes identified with Orcus.
RP39561. Bronze AE 16, H-J Marcianopolis 6.22.16.2 (this coin, R3), Varbanov I 1110 (R5), AMNG I/I 699, Moushmov 512, VF, weight 2.264 g, maximum diameter 15.7 mm, die axis 180o, Markianopolis (Devnya, Bulgaria) mint, obverse Π CEΠTI ΓETA C K, draped bust right, from behind; reverse MAPKIANOΠOΛITΩN, Thanatos standing right, legs crossed, leaning on torch set on altar; H-J Marcianopolis plate coin!; SOLD


Philip II, July or August 247 - Late 249 A.D., Deultum, Thrace

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RP27852. Bronze AE 17, Varbanov 3127, F, weight 2.477 g, maximum diameter 17.8 mm, die axis 180o, Deultum (Debelt, Bulgaria) mint, obverse M IVL PILIPPVS CAES, laureate head right; reverse C - F / P - D, Thanatos, winged, standing left, resting on torch; rare; SOLD


Caracalla, 28 January 198 - 8 April 217 A.D., Nikopolis ad Istrum, Moesia Inferior

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The figure on the reverse is sometimes identified as Eros (Cupid) or a generic winged Genius. The inverted torch represents a life extinguished, indicating the figure is Thanatos (death). By the Severan Era, there was increased hope for an afterlife in pleasant Elysium rather than in dismal Hades. Thanatos was associated more with a gentle passing than a woeful demise. Thanatos as a winged boy, very much akin to Cupid, with crossed legs and an inverted torch, became the most common symbol for death, depicted on many Roman sarcophagi.
RP19429. Bronze assarion, H-H-J Nikopolis 8.18.16.7 corr. (NIKOΠOΛI−T, no T on pl. coin), Varbanov I 2930 var. (AV KMA-), AMNG I/I 1592 var. (legends), Moushmov 1092, gF, weight 2.393 g, maximum diameter 15.5 mm, die axis 0o, Nicopolis ad Istrum (Nikyup, Bulgaria) mint, obverse AV K M AV - ANTWNIN, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse NIKOΠOΛI − ΠPOC ICTΠ, Thanatos standing right with legs crossed, left hand to face, right resting on inverted torch; scarce; SOLD


Caracalla, 28 January 198 - 8 April 217 A.D., Pautalia, Thrace

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BB20643. Bronze AE 18, Varbanov II 5277, F, rough, weight 3.289 g, maximum diameter 17.6 mm, die axis 0o, Pautalia (Kyustendil, Bulgaria) mint, obverse AY K M AYP ANTΩNINOC, laureate bust right; reverse ΠAYTAΛEΩTΩN, Thanatos standing right, legs crossed, leaning on torch; SOLD


Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D., Nikopolis ad Istrum, Moesia Inferior

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The figure on the reverse is sometimes identified as Eros (Cupid) or a generic winged Genius. The inverted torch represents a life extinguished, indicating the figure is Thanatos (death). By the Severan Era, there was increased hope for an afterlife in pleasant Elysium rather than in dismal Hades. Thanatos was associated more with a gentle passing than a woeful demise. Thanatos as a winged boy, very much akin to Cupid, with crossed legs and an inverted torch, became the most common symbol for death, depicted on many Roman sarcophagi.
RP18191. Bronze assarion, H-H-J Nikopolis 8.14.16.7, cf. Varbanov I 2270 (reverse legend), AMNG I/I 1368 (same), BMC Thrace -, SNG Cop -, VF, attractive green patina, weight 2.063 g, maximum diameter 15.5 mm, die axis 225o, Nicopolis ad Istrum (Nikyup, Bulgaria) mint, obverse AV KAI CEVPOC, laureate bust right; reverse NIKOΠOΛITΩN ΠPOC ICTPO, winged Thanatos with crossed legs facing, holds flaming torch reversed; SOLD




  




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Thanatos