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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Greek Coins| ▸ |Geographic - All Periods| ▸ |Anatolia| ▸ |Ionia| ▸ |Other Ionia||View Options:  |  |  |   

Ionia

Ionia lies in central Western Anatolia (Asia Minor) on the shores of the Aegean Sea. The region is rather small and mountainous unsuited for agriculture but excellent for seafaring. Greek settlement took place in the 11th to 10th Centuries B.C. despite hostilities with the native Luwians (Indo-European people related to the Hittites and Lycians). After resisting fairly well to the Cimmerian invasion, the Ionians were gradually conquered by the Lycian Kingdom, and later by the Persian Empire. Ionia was freed by Alexander but became a contested prize for the Hellenistic kings, until the last king of Pergamum bequeathed his land to Rome. Ionia offered the world countless philosophers and men of science, and a fabulous school of art.

Herakleia ad Latmon, Ionia, 155 - 145 B.C.

|Other| |Ionia|, |Herakleia| |ad| |Latmon,| |Ionia,| |155| |-| |145| |B.C.||stephanophoric| |tetradrachm|
SH48958. Silver stephanophoric tetradrachm, SNGvA 1977, Pozzi 2453, EF, weight 16.351 g, maximum diameter 34.6 mm, die axis 270o, Herakleia ad Latmon mint, obverse head of Athena right, wearing necklace and winged and crested Attic helmet decorated with Pegasos and five horses; reverse HPAKΛEΩN, club within oak-wreath; ethnic, owl and two monograms across fields; SOLD


Western Anatolia, c. 620 - 600 B.C., Plain Globular Type

|Archaic| |Electrum|, |Western| |Anatolia,| |c.| |620| |-| |600| |B.C.,| |Plain| |Globular| |Type||hekte|
Certificate of Authenticity issued by David R. Sear.

Unpublished! The majority of the earliest electrum issues were struck on the lighter Milesian weight standard, with hectes weighing approximately 2.35 grams. This example, however is on the heavier Phocaic standard that was used at mints such as Cyzicus, Mysia and Phocaea, Ionia.
SH85577. Electrum hekte, Phokaic standard 1/6 stater; unpublished, EF, flan cracks, weight 2.721 g, maximum diameter 8.96 mm, uncertain western Anatolia mint, c. 620 - 600 B.C.; obverse plain globular surface; reverse one small incuse square punch; extremely rare; SOLD


Samos, Islands off Ionia, c. 526 - 524 B.C.

|Other| |Ionia|, |Samos,| |Islands| |off| |Ionia,| |c.| |526| |-| |524| |B.C.||drachm|
Samos is the birthplace of Pythagoras. One of the famous attractions of the island is the aqueduct-tunnel which was dug through a mountain to bring water to the city from a secret spring. The tunnel was in use for a very long period and discovered in 19th century thanks to Herodotos' writing of it. The tunnel is over 1000m long, an engineering marvel dug from both ends by two simultaneously working teams.
GA41265. Silver drachm, BMC Ionia p. 354, 45; SNG Cop 1674; SNGvA 2290, EF/VF, weight 3.114 g, maximum diameter 12.9 mm, die axis 270o, Islands of Ionia, Samos mint, obverse forepart of winged boar right; reverse facing lion scalp within dotted square within incuse square; ex Numismatic Fine Arts, Edward Gans, 10 Rock Lane, Berkeley, 12/64, $75; from the Dr. J. Hewitt Judd Collection (author of United States Pattern Coins Experimental & Trial Pieces); SOLD


Chios, Islands off Ionia, c. 210 - 190 B.C., Civic Coinage in the Name and Types of Alexander the Great

|Macedonian| |Kingdom|, |Chios,| |Islands| |off| |Ionia,| |c.| |210| |-| |190| |B.C.,| |Civic| |Coinage| |in| |the| |Name| |and| |Types| |of| |Alexander| |the| |Great||tetradrachm|
Chios, in the Aegean Sea, 7 kilometers (4.3 miles) off the Anatolian coast, is the fifth largest of the Greek islands. At the end of the 7th century B.C., Chios became one of the first cities to strike coins, establishing the sphinx as its symbol. It maintained this tradition for almost 900 years. Based on the huge necropolis at the main city of Chios, by the 5th to 4th centuries B.C., the island had grown to an estimated population of over 120,000 (2 - 3 times the current population). During the Hellenistic period, the Chios became famous for the high quality of its wine and was the largest exporter of Greek wine. Chian amphoras, with a characteristic sphinx emblem and bunches of grape have been found as far away as Gaul, Upper Egypt and Southern Russia. After the Roman conquest Chios became part of the province of Asia. The Empire ceded Chios to the Republic of Genoa in 1261.
SH90706. Silver tetradrachm, Price 2375 corr. (form of monogram); Bauslaugh Posthumous Series 41A corr. (same); Müller Alexander 1096; Mektepini Hoard 340 - 341; HGC 6 1133 (S), gVF, light corrosion and marks, weight 16.860 g, maximum diameter 29.6 mm, die axis 0o, Islands of Ionia, Chios mint, c. 210 - 190 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean Lion skin, scalp over head, forepaws tied at neck; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus enthroned left, right leg drawn back, throne with high back, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, monogram over sphinx seated left in lower left field, monogram under throne; scarce; SOLD


Chios, Islands off Ionia, c. 478 - 431 B.C.

|Other| |Ionia|, |Chios,| |Islands| |off| |Ionia,| |c.| |478| |-| |431| |B.C.||stater|
Chios was one of the first cities to strike coins, taking the sphinx as its symbol, a tradition maintained for almost 900 years. In 546 B.C. Chios became subject to the Persia. It was liberated by the Persia defeat at the Battle of Mycale in 479 B.C. When the Athenians formed the Delian League, Chios joined as one of the few members who did not have to pay tribute but instead supplied ships.
GA57815. Silver stater, SNG Cop 1540 ff., F, weight 7.887 g, maximum diameter 16.0 mm, Islands of Ionia, Chios mint, c. 478 - 431 B.C.; obverse Sphinx seated left, amphora before (off flan); reverse rough quadripartite incuse square; SOLD


Chios, Islands off Ionia, c. 290 - 275 B.C., Civic Coinage in the Name and Types of Alexander the Great

|Other| |Ionia|, |Chios,| |Islands| |off| |Ionia,| |c.| |290| |-| |275| |B.C.,| |Civic| |Coinage| |in| |the| |Name| |and| |Types| |of| |Alexander| |the| |Great||drachm|
Lysimachus may have controlled Chios after Antigonus was killed at Ipsus in 301 B.C. A Chian inscription honoring one of his generals supports this view. But Chios is likely to have had significant autonomy even if it continued to be ruled by a foreign monarch. Beginning c. 290 B.C., the island struck precious metal for the first time in over half a century. At the same time they began developing close economic and political relations with other Greek cities and states. Lysimachus lost his life at the Battle of Corupedium in 281 B.C. The victor, Seleukos, was murdered less than a year later and his empire plunged into political chaos. Chios was almost certainly completely autonomous by this time. -- Lagos, Constantinos. A study of the coinage of Chios in the Hellenistic and Roman periods. PhD thesis, Durham University. (1998). Available at Durham E-Theses Online: https://etheses.dur.ac.uk/4848/
GS86313. Silver drachm, Price 2322; Müller Alexander 1534; Bauslaugh Posthumous p. 4, series 4 (no die matches); SNG Cop 903; SNG Munchen -; SNG Alpha Bank -, Choice EF, fantastic detail, exotic style, toned, weight 4.181 g, maximum diameter 20.2 mm, die axis 0o, Islands of Ionia, Chios mint, under Lysimachos or autonomous, c. 290 - 275 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean Lion skin, scalp over head, forepaws tied at neck; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus Aëtophoros seated left on throne without back, nude to the waist, himation around hips and legs, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, right leg drawn back, monogram over bunch of grapes left; SOLD


Macedonian Kingdom, Alexander the Great, 336 - 323 B.C.

|Macedonian| |Kingdom|, |Macedonian| |Kingdom,| |Alexander| |the| |Great,| |336| |-| |323| |B.C.||tetradrachm|
The chelys or lyre was a symbol used by quite a few cities but it was a primary symbol of Mytilene. Mytilene does not appear to have struck Alexandrine coinage with the royal title. The monogram, which is not listed in Price, appears to include all the letters to spell MAΓNHΣIΩN (of Magnesia) however, that may just be our vivid imagination.
SH63700. Silver tetradrachm, Apparently unpublished; Price -, Müller Alexander -, Hersh -, SNG Delepierre -, VF, weight 16.791 g, maximum diameter 26.7 mm, die axis 315o, Mytilene(?) or Magnesia(?) mint, posthumous, 317 - 311 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean Lion skin, scalp over head, forepaws tied at neck; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus Aëtophoros enthroned left, eagle in right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, right leg drawn back, chelys(?) left, monogram below throne; possibly unique; SOLD


Klazomenai, Ionia, c. 387 - 360 B.C.

|Other| |Ionia|, |Klazomenai,| |Ionia,| |c.| |387| |-| |360| |B.C.||hemidrachm|
Klazomenai was home to large numbers of swans. The principal god of Klazomenai was Apollo, who flew south each year from his winter home in a chariot drawn by swans. The swan was also a pun on the name Klazomenai - the verb klazo was used to describe the call of the wild birds.
SH49953. Silver hemidrachm, SNG Cop 23 var.; BMC Ionia p. 19, 23 ff. var.; SNGvA 1989 var.; SNG Munchen XX 462 ff. var. (all refs various symbols and magistrates), VF/F, porous, weight 1.822 g, maximum diameter 12.9 mm, die axis 180o, Klazomenai (Urla, Turkey) mint, c. 387 - 360 B.C.; obverse Apollo, laureate, facing slightly left; reverse KΛA, swan standing left, pluming its breast, X? left, IA? above; SOLD


Chios, Islands off Ionia, c. 431 - 412 B.C.

|Other| |Ionia|, |Chios,| |Islands| |off| |Ionia,| |c.| |431| |-| |412| |B.C.||drachm|
Chios, in the Aegean Sea, 7 kilometers (4.3 miles) off the Anatolian coast, is the fifth largest of the Greek islands. At the end of the 7th century B.C., Chios became one of the first cities to strike coins, establishing the sphinx as its symbol. It maintained this tradition for almost 900 years. Based on the huge necropolis at the main city of Chios, by the 5th to 4th centuries B.C., the island had grown to an estimated population of over 120,000 (2 - 3 times the current population). During the Hellenistic period, the Chios became famous for the high quality of its wine and was the largest exporter of Greek wine. Chian amphoras, with a characteristic sphinx emblem and bunches of grape have been found as far away as Gaul, Upper Egypt and Southern Russia. After the Roman conquest Chios became part of the province of Asia. The Empire ceded Chios to the Republic of Genoa in 1261.
GA71652. Silver drachm, SNG Cop 1546, SNGvA 2275, Rosen 607, Baldwin Chios 79, SGCV II 4600, VF, attractive style, well centered on a tight flan, weight 3.558 g, maximum diameter 13.5 mm, Islands of Ionia, Chios mint, c. 431 - 412 B.C.; obverse Sphinx seated left, grapes over amphora before, the whole on a circular raised shield; reverse Incuse square divided into four square compartments by fine cross lines, surface of compartments is roughened by design of the die (not wear); SOLD


Chios, Islands off Ionia, 2nd Century A.D.

|Other| |Ionia|, |Chios,| |Islands| |off| |Ionia,| |2nd| |Century| |A.D.||1| |1/2| |assarion|
Rare and interesting coin naming the denomination! Chios also minted coins of 1 assarion, 2 assaria ACCAPIA ∆YO and 3 assaria ACCAPIA TPIA.
GB39993. Bronze 1 1/2 assarion, SNG Cop 1650 and 1661 var.; BMC Ionia p. 343, 127 and p. 345, 136-7 var.; SNGvA -, VF, weight 7.041 g, maximum diameter 24.7 mm, die axis 180o, Islands of Ionia, Chios mint, obverse XIΩN, Sphinx seated right, forepaw resting on amphora, club in exergue; reverse ACCAPION HMVCV, crossed thyrsi, grapes above, stars in fields, all within grape vine wreath; rare; SOLD




  




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REFERENCES|

Babelon, E. Traité des Monnaies Grecques et Romaines. (Paris, 1901-1932).
Babelon, E. La collection Waddington au cabinet des médailles. (Paris, 1897-1898).
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Burnett, A., M. Amandry, et al. Roman Provincial Coinage. (1992 - ).
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Head, B. A Catalog of the Greek Coins in the British Museum, Ionia. (London, 1892).
Hoover, O. Handbook of Coins of the Islands: Adriatic, Ionian, Thracian, Aegean, & Carpathian Seas (Excluding Crete and Cyprus), 6th to 1st Centuries BC. HGC 6. (Lancaster, 2010).
Imhoof-Blumer, F. Kleinasiatische Münzen. (Vienna, 1901 - 1902).
Kinns, P. Studies in the coinage of Ionia: Erythrae, Teos, Lebedus, Colophon, c. 400-30 BC. (unpublished thesis).
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Marcellesi, M.-C. Milet des Hécatomnides à la domination romaine. Milesische Forschungen Bd. 3. (Mainz, 2004).
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Price, M. J. The Coinage of in the Name of Alexander the Great and Philip Arrhidaeus. (London, 1991).
Sear, D. Greek Coins and Their Values, Volume 2, Asia and Africa. (London, 1979).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Denmark, The Royal Collection of Coins and Medals, Danish National Museum, Vol. 5: Ionia, Caria and Lydia. (West Milford, NJ, 1982).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Deutschland, München Staatlische Münzsammlung, Part 20: Ionien 1: (Frühes Elektron-Priene). (Berlin, 1995).
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Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Deutschland, Sammlung Hans Von Aulock, Vol. 1: Pontus, Paphlagonia, Bithynia, Mysia, Troas, Aiolis, Lesbos, Ionia. (Berlin, 1957).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Finland, The Erkki Keckman Collection in the Skopbank, Helsinki, Part II: Asia Minor except Karia. (Helsinki, 1999).
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Thompson, M. "Posthumous Philip II Staters of Asia Minor" in Studia Naster (1982).
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