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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Themes & Provenance ▸ Provenance ▸ CollectionsView Options:  |  |  |   


Antonia, Daughter of Mark Antony, Wife of Nero Drusus, Mother of Claudius, Grandmother of Caligula

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Antonia was the daughter of Marc Antony and Octavia, the wife of Nero Drusus, the mother of Claudius, and a grandmother of Caligula. Renowned for her beauty and virtue, Antonia was revered by the Roman people. She was probably poisoned by Caligula or committed suicide. She never loved her son Claudius, calling him a monster and a fool, but he posthumously made her Augusta in 41 A.D. and issued all her coinage.
SH68887. Silver denarius, RIC I Claudius 66, BMCRE I Claudius 111, Cohen 2, SRCV I 1900, F, toned, weight 3.717 g, maximum diameter 18.9 mm, die axis 225o, Rome mint, struck under Claudius, c. 41 - 42 A.D.; obverse ANTONIA AVGVSTA, draped bust right, wearing barley wreath; reverse CONSTANTIAE AVGVSTI (consistency of the emperor), Antonia standing facing, draped as Constantia, long torch in right, cornucopia in left; from the Jyrki Muona Collection; rare (R2); $880.00 SALE PRICE $792.00


Philip I the Arab, February 244 - End of September 249 A.D.

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Felicitas was the goddess or personification of good luck and success. She played an important role in Rome's state religion during the empire and was frequently portrayed on coins. She became a prominent symbol of the wealth and prosperity of the Roman Empire.
RS75697. Silver antoninianus, RIC IV 75A (R); RSC IV 130, SRCV III 8945, Hunter III -, EF, superb strike with sharp dies, nice metal, weight 4.966 g, maximum diameter 22.4 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 247 - 248 A.D.; obverse IMP M IVL PHILIPPVS AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse P M TR P IIII COS P P (high priest, tribune of the people for four years, consul, father of the country), Felicitas standing left, long caduceus in right hand, cornucopia in left hand; $350.00 SALE PRICE $315.00


Phalanna, Thessaly, 360 - 340 B.C.

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Coins of Phalanna (a few miles northwest of Larissa on the left bank of the Peneius) are scarce. There was also a Phalanna on Crete, colonized by Thessalians from Phalanna in Thessaly.
GS84798. Silver drachm, BCD Thessaly I 1250 (same dies); BCD Thessaly II 569; SNG Cop 199; BMC Thessaly p. 41, 1; Papaevangelou-Genakos 1; HGC 4 165 (R1), VF/F, fine classical style, toned, porous, reverse a little rough, weight 5.314 g, maximum diameter 19.1 mm, die axis 180o, Phalanna mint, 360 - 340 B.C.; obverse youthful male head with short, curly hair right; reverse FAΛ-ANN-A-IΩN, bridled horse prancing right without a rider; ex BCD with his round tag noting, "T/ne ex Thess., Oct. 86, £250.-"; $350.00 SALE PRICE $315.00


Constantine II, 22 May 337 - March or April 340 A.D.

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This type is apparently unpublished and this is the only example of the type known to Forum. This reverse was used for very rare (both R5) issues of Licinius I and Licinius II Caesar. CNG e-auction 368, lot 496, is Constantine II with this same reverse, also 5th officina, but with Constantine II on the obverse left holding a Victory on globe and mappa.
RL76392. Billon centenionalis, apparently unpublished, cf. RIC VII Siscia 116 - 117 (for obv. type) and 138 - 139 (for rev. type, issues of the Licinii), EF, excellent portrait, both sides slightly off-center, left side of reverse legend weak, some porosity, a few light marks, weight 2.773 g, maximum diameter 19.0 mm, die axis 180o, 5th officina, Siscia (Sisak, Croatia) mint, as caesar, 320 A.D.; obverse CONSTANTINVS IVN NOB C, laureate and cuirassed bust left; reverse VIRTVS EXERCIT (courage of the army), vexillum inscribed VOT / XX in two lines, two seated barbarian captives back-to-back flanking base, Christogram (Chi-Rho monogram) left, ESIS star in exergue; ex Scott Collection; extremely rare; $270.00 SALE PRICE $243.00


Karystos, Euboia, 369 - 265 B.C.

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A Persian force landed at Carystus in 490 B.C. and quickly subdued its inhabitants. Soon after the Battle of Salamis, in 480 B.C., the Athenian fleet led by Themistocles extorted money from the city. When Athenians then asked Carystus to join the Delian League, the city refused. Athens would not accept a refusal, so they attacked and plundered Carystus, forcing the city to join the league.
GS74058. Silver hemidrachm, BCD Euboia 566; SNG Cop 420; Traitť 151; BMC Central Greece p. 101, 10 var. (abbreviated ethnic), F, toned, marks, edge bumps, weight 1.836 g, maximum diameter 13.2 mm, die axis 0o, Karystos mint, 369 - 265 B.C.; obverse bearded head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean Lion scalp headdress tied at the neck; reverse palm tree, club left, KAP−YΣTI/ΩN across field; ex BCD Collection with his round tag noting "'Argos' Coll., through DGP, Feb 74, 4000 drs."; very rare; $170.00 SALE PRICE $153.00


Romano-British Empire, Carausius, Mid 286 - Spring or Early Summer 293 A.D.

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Colchester (Camulodunum) and its wall were rebuilt by the Romans after Queen Boudica led a rebellion in A.D. 60 and destroyed the town. Balkerne Gate in Colchester is the largest Roman arch in Britain. Balkerne Gate Colchester
RA73257. Billon antoninianus, Webb Carausius 416, RIC V 358, Cohen VII 261, SRCV IV 13681 var. (S-C), Hunter IV 122 var. (same), VF, green patina, well centered, bumps, marks and scratches, weight 3.224 g, maximum diameter 22.9 mm, die axis 180o, 1st officina, Camulodunum (Colchester, England) mint, c. 292 - early 293 A.D.; obverse IMP C CARAVSIVS AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse PROVID AVG (the foresight of the Emperor), Providentia standing left, globe in right hand, long transverse scepter in left hand, S - P flanking across field at center, C in exergue; from the Charles Peters Carausius Collection; $165.00 SALE PRICE $149.00


Romano-British Empire, Carausius, Mid 286 - Spring or Early Summer 293 A.D.

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Laetitia was a minor Roman goddess of gaiety, her name deriving from the root word laeta, meaning happy.
RA73224. Billon antoninianus, RIC V, part 2, 456; Webb Carausius 510; Hunter IV 118 var. (P AVG); Burton Latimer -; SRCV IV -, F, uneven strike, corrosion, light cleaning scratches, weight 2.884 g, maximum diameter 23.5 mm, die axis 180o, Camulodunum (Colchester, England) mint, 291 - 292 A.D.; obverse IMP C CARAVSIVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse LAETITI AVG, Laetitia standing left, wreath in right hand, anchor in right hand, S - C (senatus consulto) flanking high across field; from the Charles Peters Carausius Collection, ex Nilus Coins; $155.00 SALE PRICE $140.00


Romano-British Empire, Carausius, Mid 286 - Spring or Early Summer 293 A.D..

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Overstruck over a denarius of Severus Alexander, which suggests that the new coin was worth at least as much of the old one. Otherwise, it would have made more sense to melt the denarius.
RA73221. Silver antoninianus, cf. RIC V 287 (S), Webb Carausius 336, SRCV IV 13629, VF, toned, weight 2.664 g, maximum diameter 23.8 mm, die axis 225o, Camulodunum (Colchester, England) mint, c. 290 - 291 A.D.; obverse IMP CARAVSIVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse MONETA AVG, Moneta standing left, scales in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, mintmark obscured by over-strike effects; undertype bust (Severus Alexander?) visible; from the Charles Peters Carausius Collection, ex Forum (2010); scarce; $145.00 SALE PRICE $131.00


Roman Republic, C. Coelius Caldus, 51 B.C.

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The obverse depicts the moneyer's grandfather, also Caius Coelius Caldus, consul in 94 B.C., and the first in his family to obtain high office. Prior to his term as consul, in 107 B.C., he was a tribune of the plebs and passed a lex tabellaria, requiring a secret ballot to determine the verdict in cases of high treason. He was a praetor in 100 or 99 B.C., and proconsul of Hispania Citerior the following year. Later, during Sulla's second civil war, he tried to help Gaius Marius the Younger by preventing Pompey from joining his forces to Sulla, but failed.

The reverse honors the moneyer's father and uncle. His father was a Epulo Jovis, one of the septemviri Epulones, the college of seven priests responsible for banquets and sacrifices given in honor of Jove and the other gods. His uncle was an imperator, augur and decemvir, Imperator, Augur, Decemvir (sacris faciundis), commander for military forces, a priest-soothsayer, and one of a body of ten Roman magistrates responsible for management of the Games of Apollo, and the Secular Games. The moneyer's name and title are in the exergue.
RS72975. Silver denarius, Crawford 437/2a, Sydenham 894, RSC I Coelia 7, BMCRR II 3837, SRCV I 404, Choice aF, toned, well centered on a tight flan, weight 3.623 g, maximum diameter 17.5 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 51 B.C.; obverse C COEL CALDVS downwards on right, COS below, head of Coelius Caldus right, standard inscribed HIS (Hispania) behind, standard in the form of a boar (emblem of of Clunia, Hispania) before; reverse C CALDVS downward on left, IMP A X (Imperator, Augur, Decemvir) in four lines on right, CALDVS III VIR (ALD ligate, triumvir) below, statue of god seated left between two trophies of arms, all on a high lectisternium with front inscribed L CALDVS VI VIR EPVL (VIR and VL ligate, Lucius Caldus Septemvir Epulo); from the Jyrki Muona Collection; scarce; $140.00 SALE PRICE $126.00


Larissa, Thessaly, Greece, Late 4th - Early 3rd Century B.C.

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When Larissa ceased minting the federal coins it shared with other Thessalian towns and adopted its own coinage in the late fifth century B.C., it chose local types. The obverse depicted the local fountain nymph Larissa, for whom the town was named, probably inspired by the famous coins of Kimon depicting the Syracusan nymph Arethusa. The reverse depicted a horse in various poses.
GS84134. Silver hemidrachm, BCD Thessaly II 337; BMC Thessaly p. 30, 67; SNG Cop 133; Herrmann 15; HGC 4 514; SNG Munchen -; SNG Alpha Bank -, gVF, well centered, areas of rough corrosion around edges, weight 1.8651 g, maximum diameter 14.6 mm, die axis 225o, Larissa mint, late 4th - early 3rd century B.C.; obverse Nymph Larissa facing slightly left, wearing ampyx; reverse ΛAPIΣ/AIΩN, horse crouching right, left foreleg raised, preparing to lie down, Z below horse's belly; ex BCD with his round ticket noting, "T/ne ex Thess., Apr. 87, 15000 drs."; $135.00 SALE PRICE $122.00




  







Catalog current as of Monday, August 21, 2017.
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