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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Greek Coins| ▸ |Geographic - All Periods| ▸ |Thrace & Moesia| ▸ |Thracian Tribes||View Options:  |  |  |   

Thracian Tribes

Divided into numerous tribes, the Thracians did not recognize themselves as a single group. Thrace and Thracians were names given them by the Greeks. The Thracians did not form a lasting political organization until the Odrysian state was founded in the 5th century B.C. The 4th century was a time of strife and Macedonian encroachment. The coins of the Thracian rulers, which were struck in the Greek cities of the kingdom, are so scarce that they may have been struck more symbolic of regal authority than to meet the needs of trade.


Thracian Tribes, c. 400 - 338 B.C., Imitative of Chersonesos

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This "barbarous imitation" was likely minted by a Thracian tribe living near the Greek colony of Cherronesos. Imitative tribal coinage such as this was common in the outlying regions of the classical world as peoples who traded with the ancient Greeks and Romans, also emulated their ways. The coin's simplified style is typical of such coinage. Tribal coinage has not been as well studied or documented and apparently no Cherronesos imitatives are listed in the references held by Forum.
GS91082. Silver hemidrachm, cf. McClean II 4056; BMC Thrace p. 183, 8; Dewing 1301; SNG Cop 824; Weber II - (Chersonesos prototype), VF, extremely crude lion, light marks, weight 2.040 g, maximum diameter 13.4 mm, tribal mint, c. 400 - 338 B.C.; obverse lion forepart right, head turned back left, tongue protruding; reverse quadripartite incuse square with alternating shallow and deeper sunken quarters, pellet at the center of each of the two opposite deeper quarters; $250.00 (€220.00)
 


Thracian Tribes, c. 400 - 338 B.C., Imitative of Chersonesos

Click for a larger photo
This "barbarous imitation" was likely minted by a Thracian tribe living near the Greek colony of Cherronesos. Imitative tribal coinage such as this was common in the outlying regions of the classical world as peoples who traded with the ancient Greeks and Romans, also emulated their ways. The coin's simplified style is typical of such coinage. Tribal coinage has not been as well studied or documented and apparently no Cherronesos imitatives are listed in the references held by Forum.
GS91084. Silver hemidrachm, cf. McClean II 4079; BMC Thrace p. 183, 11; SNG Ashmolean 3589; Weber 2419; SNG Cop - (Chersonesos prototype), VF, lightly etched surface, obverse off center, weight 2.470 g, maximum diameter 13.6 mm, tribal mint, c. 400 - 338 B.C.; obverse lion forepart right, head turned back left; reverse quadripartite incuse square with alternating shallow and deeper sunken quarters, pellet in one sunken quarter, bunch of grapes in the opposite sunken quarter; $250.00 (€220.00)
 


Thracian Tribes, c. 400 - 338 B.C., Imitative of Chersonesos

Click for a larger photo
This "barbarous imitation" was likely minted by a Thracian tribe living near the Greek colony of Cherronesos. Imitative tribal coinage such as this was common in the outlying regions of the classical world as peoples who traded with the ancient Greeks and Romans, also emulated their ways. The coin's simplified style is typical of such coinage. Tribal coinage has not been as well studied or documented and apparently no Cherronesos imitatives are listed in the references held by Forum.
GS91085. Silver hemidrachm, cf. McClean II 4079; BMC Thrace p. 183, 11; SNG Ashmolean 3589; Weber 2419; SNG Cop - (Chersonesos prototype), VF, uneven obverse strike, porous etched surfaces, weight 2.374 g, maximum diameter 13.2 mm, tribal mint, c. 400 - 338 B.C.; obverse lion forepart right, head turned back left; reverse quadripartite incuse square with alternating shallow and deeper sunken quarters, pellet in one sunken quarter, bunch of grapes in the opposite sunken quarter; $250.00 (€220.00)
 


Thracian Tribes, c. 400 - 338 B.C., Imitative of Chersonesos

Click for a larger photo
This "barbarous imitation" was likely minted by a Thracian tribe living near the Greek colony of Cherronesos. Imitative tribal coinage such as this was common in the outlying regions of the classical world as peoples who traded with the ancient Greeks and Romans, also emulated their ways. The coin's simplified style is typical of such coinage. Tribal coinage has not been as well studied or documented and apparently no Cherronesos imitatives are listed in the references held by Forum.
GS91080. Silver hemidrachm, cf. McClean II 4056; BMC Thrace p. 183, 8; Dewing 1301; SNG Cop 824; Weber II - (Chersonesos prototype), VF, crude style, porous, edge crack, weight 2.161 g, maximum diameter 13.81 mm, tribal mint, c. 400 - 338 B.C.; obverse lion forepart right, head turned back left; reverse quadripartite incuse square with alternating shallow and deeper sunken quarters, pellet at the center of each of the two opposite deeper quarters; rare; $225.00 (€198.00)
 


Thracian Tribes, c. 400 - 338 B.C., Imitative of Chersonesos

Click for a larger photo
This "barbarous imitation" was likely minted by a Thracian tribe living near the Greek colony of Cherronesos. Imitative tribal coinage such as this was common in the outlying regions of the classical world as peoples who traded with the ancient Greeks and Romans, also emulated their ways. The coin's simplified style is typical of such coinage. Tribal coinage has not been as well studied or documented and apparently no Cherronesos imitatives are listed in the references held by Forum.
GS91083. Silver hemidrachm, cf. McClean II 4056; BMC Thrace p. 183, 8; Dewing 1301; SNG Cop 824; Weber II - (Chersonesos prototype), VF, crude style, etched surfaces, edge crack, weight 2.249 g, maximum diameter 13.2 mm, tribal mint, c. 400 - 338 B.C.; obverse lion forepart right, head turned back left, tongue protruding; reverse quadripartite incuse square with alternating shallow and deeper sunken quarters, pellet at the center of each of the two opposite deeper quarters; rare; $200.00 (€176.00)
 


Thraco-Macedonian Tribes, c. 510 - 454 B.C.

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GA91170. Silver obol, Weber II 1841; SNG ANS -; SNG Alpha Bank -; SNG München -; Tzamalis -; Raymond -; HGC 3.1 -, VF, toned, weight 0.754 g, maximum diameter 8.1 mm, tribal mint, c. 510 - 454 B.C.; obverse head of goat right; reverse crude incuse square; very rare; $150.00 (€132.00)
 


Thracian Tribes, c. 400 - 338 B.C., Imitative of Chersonesos

Click for a larger photo
This "barbarous imitation" was likely minted by a Thracian tribe living near the Greek colony of Cherronesos. Imitative tribal coinage such as this was common in the outlying regions of the classical world as peoples who traded with the ancient Greeks and Romans, also emulated their ways. The coin's simplified style is typical of such coinage. Tribal coinage has not been as well studied or documented and apparently no Cherronesos imitatives are listed in the references held by Forum.
GS91081. Silver hemidrachm, cf. McClean II 4056; BMC Thrace p. 183, 8; Dewing 1301; SNG Cop 824; Weber II - (Chersonesos prototype), VF, crude style, etched surfaces, weight 2.301 g, maximum diameter 12.8 mm, tribal mint, c. 400 - 338 B.C.; obverse lion forepart right, head turned back left, tongue protruding; reverse quadripartite incuse square with alternating shallow and deeper sunken quarters, pellet at the center of each of the two opposite deeper quarters; rare; $145.00 (€127.60)
 


Thracians, Odrysian Kingdom, Seuthes III, c. 330 - 295 B.C.

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Seuthes was the high priest of the Cabeiri, and the king of the Odrysian Thracians. He revolted against Macedonia about 325 B.C., after Alexander's governor Zopyrion was killed in battle against the Getae. Seuthes was apparently subdued by Antipater, but after Alexander died in 323 B.C. he again took up arms in opposition to the new governor Lysimachus. They fought to a draw and both withdrew, but ultimately Seuthes acknowledged Lysimachus' authority. In 320 B.C., Seuthes III moved the Odrysian kingdom to central Thrace and built his capital city at Seuthopolis. In 313 B.C. he supported Antigonus I against Lysimachus, occupying the passes of Mount Haemus, but was again defeated and forced to submit to Lysimachus. After Lysimachus died in 281 B.C., Thrace came under the suzerainty of Ptolemy Keraunos.|Head| of |Seuthes| |III|
GB91979. Bronze AE 17, Youroukova 77; SNG BM Black Sea 319 var. (altar below belly); SNG Stancomb 294 var. (star below belly); SNG Cop 1073 var. (same), VF, interesting style, bumps, scratches, tight flan, some corrosion, weight 4.167 g, maximum diameter 16.8 mm, die axis 270o, Seuthopolis (near Kazanlak, Bulgaria) mint, c. 323 - 316 B.C.; obverse laureate, bearded head of Seuthus III right; reverse horseman cantering right, left foreleg raised, ΣEYΘOY above, five-pointed star below raised foreleg; $100.00 (€88.00)
 


Thracians, Odrysian Kingdom, Seuthes III, c. 330 - 295 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Seuthes was the high priest of the Cabeiri, and the king of the Odrysian Thracians. He revolted against Macedonia about 325 B.C., after Alexander's governor Zopyrion was killed in battle against the Getae. Seuthes was apparently subdued by Antipater, but after Alexander died in 323 B.C. he again took up arms in opposition to the new governor Lysimachus. They fought to a draw and both withdrew, but ultimately Seuthes acknowledged Lysimachus' authority. In 320 B.C., Seuthes III moved the Odrysian kingdom to central Thrace and built his capital city at Seuthopolis. In 313 B.C. he supported Antigonus I against Lysimachus, occupying the passes of Mount Haemus, but was again defeated and forced to submit to Lysimachus. After Lysimachus died in 281 B.C., Thrace came under the suzerainty of Ptolemy Keraunos.|Head| of |Seuthes| |III|

GB92078. Bronze AE 19, Peter p. 182, 4 (same dies); SNG Stancomb 294; SNG Cop 1073; Youroukova 84 var. (star between forelegs); SNG BM Black Sea 319 var. (wreath vice star), F, nice turquoise patina, overstruck, light earthen deposits, edge crack, weight 5.751 g, maximum diameter 18.8 mm, die axis 90o, Seuthopolis (near Kazanlak, Bulgaria) mint, c. 323 - 316 B.C.; obverse laureate, bearded head of Seuthus III right, undertype remnant in right field; reverse horseman cantering right, left foreleg raised, ΣEYΘOY above, eight-pointed star below horse (control); scarce; $100.00 (€88.00)
 


Thracians, Odrysian Kingdom, Early 5th - Middle 4th Century B.C.

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This type has traditionally been attributed to Parion, Mysia or as a Celtic imitative of the Parion type. Based on find locations in the area of Plovdiv, Haskova, Stara Zagora and Yambol in Bulgaria, Topalov has reattributed this imitative type to the Thracian Odrysian Kingdom. He notes they may have been struck by a tribal mint or by one of the Greek cities within Odrysian territory to pay their annual tax to the tribe.
MA93685. Silver hemidrachm, Topalov Thrace p. 230, 55, aVF, tight flan, toned, etched surfaces, weight 3.044 g, maximum diameter 11.8 mm, Thracian, Greek city or tribal mint, early 5th - middle 4th century B.C.; obverse facing head of Medusa (gorgoneion); reverse incuse square containing angles in each corner forming a cruciform pattern, with pellet in center; $25.13 (€22.11)




  



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REFERENCES|

Corpus Nummorum Thracorum - http://www.corpus-nummorum.eu/
Fischer-Bossert, W. "Die Lysimachaeier des Skostokos" in Revue Belge de Numismatique et de Sigillographie CLI. (2005).
Forrer, L. Descriptive Catalogue of the Collection of Greek Coins formed by Sir Hermann Weber, Vol. II: Macedon, Thrace, Thessaly, NW, central & S. Greece. (London, 1924).
Gaebler, H. Die antiken Münzen von Makedonia und Paionia, Die antiken Münzen Nord-Griechenlands Vol. III. (Berlin, 1935).
Grose, S. W. Catalogue of the McClean Collection of Greek Coins, Fizwilliam Museum, Vol. II: The Greek mainland, the Aegean islands, Crete. (Cambridge, 1926).
Lindgren, H. Ancient Greek Bronze Coins: European Mints from the Lindgren Collection. (San Mateo, 1989).
Lindgren, H. Lindgren III: Ancient Greek Bronze Coins from the Lindgren Collection. (Quarryville, 1993).
Lorber, C. "The Goats of 'Aigai'" in pour Denyse.
Mildenberg, L. & S. Hurter, eds. The Dewing Collection of Greek Coins. ACNAC 6. (New York, 1985).
Peter, U. Die Münzen der Thrakischen Dynasten (5-3. Jahrhundert v. Chr.). (Berlin, 1997).
Poole, R.S. ed. A Catalog of the Greek Coins in the British Museum, Thrace, etc. (London, 1877).
Sear, D.R. Greek Coins and Their Values, Volume 1: Europe. (London, 1978).
Svoronos, J. L'hellénisme primitif de la Macédoine, prouvé par la numismatique et l'or du Pangée. (Paris/Athens, 1919).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Denmark, The Royal Collection of Coins and Medals, Danish National Museum, Vol. 2: Macedonia and Thrace. (West Milford, NJ, 1982).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain, Volume IX, British Museum, Part 1: The Black Sea. (London, 1993).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain, Volume XI, The William Stancomb Collection of Coins of the Black Sea Region. (Oxford, 2000).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, United States, Burton Y. Berry Collection, Part 1: Macedonia to Attica. (New York, 1961).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, United States, The Collection of the American Numismatic Society, Part 7: Macedonia 1 (Cities, Thraco-Macedonian Tribes, Paeonian kings). (New York, 1987).
Topalov, S. Ancient Thrace: Contributions to the Study of the Early Thracian Tribal Coinage and its Relations to the Coinage of the Odrysians and the Odrysian Kingdom During 6th-4th C. B.C. (Sophia, 2003).
Tzamalis, A.P. "Uncertain Thraco-Macedonian Coins" in NK 16-18 (1997-1999).
Youroukova, Y. The Coins of the Ancient Thracians. (Oxford, 1976).

Catalog current as of Wednesday, October 16, 2019.
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Thracian Tribes