Coins and Antiquities Consignment Shop
  Welcome Guest. Please login or register. All items are guaranteed authentic for eternity! Please call us if you have questions 252-646-1958. Thanks for your business! Welcome Guest. Please login or register. Internet challenged? We are happy to take your order over the phone. Please call if you have questions 252-646-1958. Thanks for your business!

Catalog Main Menu
Fine Coins Showcase

Antiquities Showcase
Recent Additions
Recent Price Reductions

Show empty categories
Shop Search
Shopping Cart
Contact Us
About Forum
Shopping at Forum
Our Guarantee
Payment Options
Shipping Options & Fees
Privacy & Security
Forum Staff
Selling Your Coins
Identifying Your Coin
   View Categories
Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Themes & Provenance ▸ Gods, Non-Olympian ▸ Other GodsView Options:  |  |  | 

Other Gods

Phaistos, Crete, c. 3rd Century B.C.

Click for a larger photo
In Greek mythology, Talos (or Talon) was a giant winged man of bronze who protected Europa in Crete from pirates and invaders. He circled the island's shores three times daily. The author of Bibliotheke thought Talos' bronze nature might indicate he was a survivor from Hesiod's mythical Age of Bronze. The satirist Lucian took this absurd notion that men of Hesiod's Age of Bronze were actually made of bronze and, for humorous effect, extended it to men of the Age of Gold.
GB85359. Bronze AE 17, Svoronos Crte 74; SNG Cop 520; BMC Crete p. 64, 27-28, F, a little rough, weight 3.702 g, maximum diameter 17.1 mm, die axis 225o, Phaistos mint, c. 3rd century B.C.; obverse Talos advancing right, nude, hurling stone in his right hand, holding another in his left hand; reverse hound on the scent to right, ΦAIC/TIΩN in two lines, starting above, ending in exergue; rare; $250.00 (212.50)

Julia Domna, Augusta, 194 - 8 April 217 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Julia Domna and her children as Terra and the Four Seasons! "The flatterers of Julia Domna pretended that all things were owing to her. The star-besprinkled globe represents the Roman world, which with her husband Septimius Severus she governed; and to the empire of which she destines her two sons, Caracalla and Geta, who, together with as many daughters, are the proof of her fecundity." -- Rasche, T. ii pl l p 932.
RS85789. Silver denarius, RIC IV S549 (R), RSC III 35, BMCRE V S21, Hunter III S22, SRCV II 6579, F, well centered, slightly rough with light even corrosion, edge cracks, weight 2.369 g, maximum diameter 20.0 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 207 A.D.; obverse IVLIA AVGVSTA, draped bust right, hair in horizontal ridges, bun at back of head; reverse FECVNDITAS (fertility), Terra reclining left under a vine, nude to the waist, right hand set on globe spangled with stars, leaning on left arm on basket of fruits, in background four children representing the four seasons; rare; $250.00 (212.50)

Herakleia, Lucania, Italy, 3rd Century B.C.

Click for a larger photo
The sea god Triton, the son of Poseidon and Amphitrite, lived with his parents in a golden palace on the bottom of the sea. Also called Tritons were a group of fish-tailed sea gods or daimones, the Satyrs of the sea. Some, called Ikhthyokentauroi (Sea-Centaurs), had the upper bodies of men and the lower bodies of Hippokampoi (fish-tailed horses).

Glaucus began his life as a mortal fisherman from Anthedon, Boeotia. He discovered a magical herb which could bring fish back to life, and decided to try eating it. The herb made him immortal, but he grew fins and a fish tail, forcing him to dwell forever in the sea. Glaucus was initially upset by this side-effect, but Oceanus and Tethys received him well and he was quickly accepted among the deities of the sea, learning from them the art of prophecy.
GB83465. Bronze AE 13, cf. Van Keuren 144 ff.; SNG ANS 116 ff.; BMC Italy p. 234, 66; SNG Cop 1141; SNG Morcom 265; HN Italy 1437, VF, well centered, nice style, green patina, weight 2.151 g, maximum diameter 13.1 mm, die axis 180o, Heraklea (in Matera Province, Italy) mint, c. 276 - 250 B.C.; obverse bust of Athena right, wearing a crested Corinthian helmet; reverse marine deity (Triton or Glaukos?) right, spear in right hand, shield in left hand, HPAKΛEIΩN below; very rare; $240.00 (204.00)

Achaean League, Tegea, 191 - 146 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
The obverse probably depicts temple-statue of Zeus Homagyrius or Homarius, in whose temple the assembly of the Achaeans met.
GB85899. Bronze tetrachalkon, cf. BCD Peloponnesos 1325, BMC Peloponnesus p. 15, 171 ff., Clerk 89 ff., SNG Cop 347 ff., aF/VF, weight 4.511 g, maximum diameter 18.6 mm, die axis 90o, Tegea (Alea, Arcadia, Peloponnese, Greece) mint, 191 -146 B.C.; obverse Zeus Amarios standing left, nude, Nike in right hand, long vertical scepter in left hand, obscure magistrates name downward behind; reverse AXAIΩN - TEΓEA-TΩN, Achaia seated left, wreath in her right hand, long scepter vertical in her left hand; ex Gitbud & Naumann auction 23 (5 Oct 2014), lot 254; rare; $100.00 (85.00)

Domitian, 13 September 81 - 18 September 96 A.D., Ascalon, Philistia

Click for a larger photo
The Philistines conquered Canaanite Ashkelon about 1150 B.C. and it became one of the five Philistine cities that were constantly warring with the Israelites and the Kingdom of Judah. The last of the Philistine cities to hold out against Nebuchadnezzar, it finally fell in 604 B.C.; burned and destroyed, its people exiled, the Philistine era ended. Ashkelon was rebuilt, dominated by Persian culture. After the Alexander's conquest, Ashkelon was an important Hellenistic seaport. The Jews drove the Greeks out of the region during the Maccabean Revolt, which lasted from 167 to 160 B.C. In 63 B.C. the area was incorporated into the Roman Republic. Cleopatra VII used Ashkelon as her refuge when her brother and sister exiled her in 49 B.C. The city remained loyal to Rome during the First Jewish Revolt.
BB75619. Bronze AE 18, Sofaer Collection 82; Rosenberger 116; RPC II 2213; BMC Palestine p. 122, 129; SNG ANS -, F, some corrosion, weight 7.108 g, maximum diameter 18.2 mm, die axis 0o, Askalon (Ashqelon, Israel) mint, 85 - 86 A.D.; obverse laureate head left, CE downward on left; reverse Phanebal standing facing, wearing military dress, raising sword above head in right hand, shield and palm frond in left hand, ΘΠP (year 189 of the Ascalon Era) downward on left, AC upward on right; rare; $80.00 (68.00)

Kios, Bithynia, c. 325 - 203 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
According to myth, Kios (Cius) was founded on the Propontis (Sea of Marmara) by Herakles when he accompanied the Argonauts. According to historians, it was founded in 626 - 625 B.C. by colonists from Miletos. Kios was often subject to greater powers, predominantly the Persian Empire until Alexander the Great invaded and took the city in 334 B.C. After disputes with Alexander's successors, Kios joined the Aetolian League, in opposition to Macedonia. In 202 B.C., Philip V of Macedonia and Prusias I of Bythinia destroyed the city and massacred, banished, or enslaved its citizens. Prusias built a new city on the site and named it for himself (Prusias ad Mare). After this atrocity, the Rodians asked the Roman Senate for help. The Romans seized this opportunity to invade Greece and defeat Philip V. In 74 B.C., after the death of King Nikomides III, the Romans occupied Kios and the whole of Bythinia. Under Rome, the name Kios was revived. An important link in the ancient Silk Road, Kios became a wealthy town.
GB71987. Bronze AE 14, SNG Cop 381; SNGvA 7004; BMC Pontus, p. 131, 20; Rec Gen I.2 7, VF, dark green patina, porous, weight 2.880 g, maximum diameter 13.5 mm, die axis 315o, Kios (Bursa, Turkey) mint, c. 325 - 203 B.C.; obverse young beardless male head (Mithras?) right, wearing a Phrygian cap and laurel wreath; reverse Kantharos between two bunches of grapes hanging on vines which emerge from the cup, A above, K-I divided by stem, all within wreath of two stalks of grain; rare; $75.00 (63.75)

Ambrakia, Epeiros, 238 - 168 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Dione in Greek mythology seems to be the equivalent of Gaia the Earth Mother and is Aphrodite's mother. Her name is really less a name than simply a title: the "Goddess", etymologically a female form of Zeus. After the Iliad, Aphrodite herself was sometimes referred to as "Dionaea" and even "Dione," just "the goddess." Roman "Diana" has a similar etymology but is not otherwise connected with Dione.
GB90141. Bronze AE 18, SNG Munchen 520 (also with B and P reversed); BMC Thessaly p. 94, 9; SNG Evelpidis 1769; SNG Cop 23 var. (Dione right), aVF, weight 6.450 g, maximum diameter 18.1 mm, die axis 135o, Ambrakia (Arta, Greece) mint, 238 - 168 B.C.; obverse laureate and veiled head of Dione left; reverse obelisk of Apollo, A-M/B-P (letters B and P reversed) in two divided lines across field, all withing laurel wreath; rare with head left; $70.00 (59.50)

Birytis, Troas, c. 350 - 250 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Birytis' precise location in western Asia Minor remains unknown but it probably stood either south of Troy or near Hellespont. Numismatics provides our only evidence this city existed.

The god Kabeiros is similar in appearance to Dionysos and the rites of his cult were likely similar to those of the Dionysian mysteries. The attributes of Kabeiros are a rhyton and hammer.
GB86110. Bronze AE 11, BMC Troas p. 40, 6 - 7; SNG Cop 250; SNG Tbingen 2574; SNG Mnchen 170; SNGvA -, VF, green patina, light corrosion, earthen deposits, weight 1.302 g, maximum diameter 11.3 mm, die axis 180o, Birytis mint, c. 350 - 250 B.C.; obverse bearded head of Kabeiros left, wearing pileus, no stars; reverse club with handle upward, B-I/P-Y flanking in two divided lines, all within laurel wreath; $25.00 (21.25)


Catalog current as of Friday, March 23, 2018.
Page created in 0.985 seconds.
Other Gods