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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Roman Coins| ▸ |Roman Provincial| ▸ |Roman Gaul||View Options:  |  |  |   

Roman Provincial Coins of Gaul

Julius Caesar, Imperator and Dictator, October 49 - 15 March 44 B.C., Nicaea, Bithynia

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Minted in Nicaea in 47 - 46 B.C., this was the first coin type to feature Julius Caesar's portrait. It was struck by the proconsul Gaius Vibius Pansa, who had been part of the Caesarian faction at Rome, and who probably owed his proconsulship to his patron. During Caesar's lifetime, only three provincial mints struck coins with his portrait: Nicaea, Bithynia; Lampsacus, Mysia; and Corinth, Greece. The first coins struck in Rome with a portrait of Caesar were denarii minted by M. Mettius in January 44 B.C.
GB71357. Bronze AE 22, RPC I 2026; Rec Gen I.2, 11; BMC Pontus p. 153, 8; SNGvA 535; SNG Cop -, aF, grainy, porous, weight 6.976 g, maximum diameter 22.2 mm, die axis 0o, Nicaea (Iznik, Turkey) mint, Gaius Vibius Pansa, proconsul, 47 - 46 B.C.; obverse NIKAIEΩN, bare head of Julius Caesar right; reverse EΠI ΓAIOY OYIBIOY ΠANΣA, Nike advancing right, raising wreath in extended right, palm frond over shoulder in left, monograms inner right and lower left, CΛΣ (year 236) in exergue; rare; SOLD


Augustus and Agrippa, 10 - 14 A.D., Colonia Augusta Nemausus, Gaul

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The reverse commemorates the conquest of Egypt in 30 B.C. This theme was probably used at Nemausus because the colony was settled by Egyptian Greeks and veterans from Anthony's army that had surrendered to Octavian at Actium. This was the last of the COL NEM issues, distinguished by the addition of the title P P (Pater Patriae), an honor bestowed to Augustus in 2 B.C.
RP34063. Bronze dupondius, RIC I 159, RPC I 525, SNG Cop 699, SNG Tüb 161, SRCV 1731, VF, choice green patina, a few small punches on reverse, weight 12.637 g, maximum diameter 25.5 mm, die axis 30o, Colonia Augusta Nemausus (Nimes, France) mint, 10 - 14 A.D.; obverse IMP DIVI F P P, back to back heads of Agrippa and Augustus, Agrippa (on left) facing left wearing a rostral crown Augustus laureate head right; reverse COL NEM, crocodile right chained to palm tree, wreath above, two palms fronds below; SOLD


Augustus and Agrippa, 16 - 15 B.C., Colonia Augusta Nemausus, Gaul

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The reverse commemorates the conquest of Egypt in 30 B.C. and was probably issued in connection with Augustus' visit to Gaul in 16 B.C.
RP46954. Bronze dupondius, RIC I 157, SNG Cop 697, SNG Tüb 142, RPC I 523, SRCV I 1729, aVF, weight 12.023 g, maximum diameter 27.2 mm, die axis 180o, Gaul, Nemausus (Nimes, France) mint, 16 - 15 B.C.; obverse IMP DIVI F, back to back heads of Agrippa and Augustus, Agrippa (on left) facing left wearing a rostral crown, Augustus bare head right; reverse COL NEM (NE ligate), crocodile right chained to a palm, wreath with long ties above, two palm fronds below; rare variant; SOLD


Nemausus, Gaul, c. 40 B.C.

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Colonia Nemausus was founded as a colony by Tiberius Claudius Nero in 45 or 44 B.C. for veterans that had served Julius Caesar under his command in Gaul and the invasion of Egypt. He was the first husband of Livia and was persuaded or forced by Octavian to divorce her. At the wedding he gave her in marriage to Octavian "just as a father would."
GB90908. Silver obol, RPC I 519, SNG Cop 691, De la Tour 2718, VF, weight 0.294 g, maximum diameter 10.5 mm, die axis 0o, Nemausus (Nimes, France) mint, c. 40 B.C.; obverse helmeted and draped, male bust right, with long sideburns; reverse NEM COL in laurel wreath; SOLD


Celtic, Northeast Gaul, Remi, 1st Century B.C.

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The Remi were a Belgic people of north-eastern Gaul, with their capital at Durocortum (Reims, France). They were renowned for their horses and cavalry. The Remi allied themselves with Julius Caesar during the Gallic Wars and were one of the few tribes not to join the rebellion of Vercingetorix. Potin has no intrinsic value, so the caste potin coinage of the Gaulish Celts was fiat money (like the dollar bill, it has no value except that it is accepted in trade). There were no weight standards. Each type was accepted only by the tribe that issued it.
CE92008. Potin unit, CCCBM III 477, Castelin Zürich 328, De La Tour 8145, Delestrée-Tache 220, VF, gray patina, weight 4.999 g, maximum diameter 20.2 mm, die axis 270o, Durocortum (Reims, France) mint, 1st century B.C.; obverse figure seated facing, with legs crossed, holding torc in right hand, plait of hair in left hand; reverse boar standing right; snake-like ornament above, star above right, star below center; ex CNG e-auction 256 (25 May 2011), lot 163 (realized $220 plus fees); SOLD


Julius Caesar and Octavian, Second Triumvirate, 36 B.C., Vienne, Gaul

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Vienne is in south-eastern France, 20 miles (32 km) south of Lyon, on the Rhone River. Before the arrival of the Roman armies under Julius Caesar, Vienne was the capital city of the Allobroges. RPC misspells the name, Vienna.

The denomination struck at Vienne was a dupondius and the type was frequently halved to make two asses.
SH58999. Bronze cut fragment, cut half of RPC I 517, SNG Cop -, aVF, rough, weight 11.687 g, maximum diameter 32.2 mm, die axis 0o, Gaul, Vienne mint, obverse IMP / CAE[SAR] DIVI F DIVI IVLI, bare heads of Julius Caesar left [and Octavian right (off flan)]; reverse [C I V] (Colonia Iulia Viennensis), prow right with superstructure; SOLD


Octavian Augustus, 16 January 27 B.C. - 19 August 14 A.D., Narbo, Gaul

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This issue was probably struck in 40 B.C., perhaps in the spring or Summer when Octavian was in Gaul.

In 40 B.C., with the Treaty of Brundisium, the Triumvirs agreed to divide the Roman Republic into spheres of influence. Gaius Octavian styled himself "Imperator Caesar" and controlled the Western provinces. Mark Antony controlled the Eastern provinces; the River Drin, the boundary between the provinces Illyricum and Macedonia, would serve as their frontier. Marcus Aemilius Lepidus controlled Hispania and Africa. The treaty was cemented by the marriage of Antony and Octavia, sister of Octavian.
RP39921. Leaded bronze as, RPC I 518 (same countermark in same location on pl. coin), F, weight 17.548 g, maximum diameter 29.6 mm, die axis 0o, Narbo (Narbonne, France) mint, c. 40 B.C.; obverse CAESAR, bare head right, countermark of cock; reverse prow with superstructure and mast right; SOLD


Augustus and Agrippa, Nemausus, Gaul, 16 - 15 B.C.

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The reverse commemorates the conquest of Egypt in 30 B.C. and was probably issued in connection with Augustus' visit to Gaul in 16 B.C.
RP60688. Bronze dupondius, SNG Cop 698 (same c/m), RIC I 155, SRCV I 1729, RPC I 523; c/m: Martini Locarno 10; Howgego -; Pangerl -, F, weight 11.595 g, maximum diameter 27.2 mm, die axis 315o, Nemausus (Nimes, France) mint, 16 - 15 B.C.; obverse IMP DIVI F, back to back heads of Augustus and Agrippa, Augustus bare head right, Agrippa left wearing a rostral crown, hook shaped punch, c/m: D palm D in circular incuse; reverse COL NEM, crocodile right chained to a palm, wreath with long ties above, two palm fronds below; SOLD


Julius Caesar and Octavian, 36 B.C., Vienne, Gaul

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Vienne is in south-eastern France, 20 miles (32 km) south of Lyon, on the Rhone River. Before the arrival of the Roman armies under Julius Caesar, Vienne was the capital city of the Allobroges. RPC misspells the name, Vienna.

The denomination struck at Vienne was a dupondius and the type was frequently halved to make two asses.
RP52099. Bronze cut fragment, cut half of RPC I 517, aVF, weight 7.006 g, maximum diameter 30.0 mm, die axis 0o, Gaul, Vienne mint, obverse [I]MP / [CAESAR DIVI F DIVI IV]LI, bare heads of [Julius Caesar (off flan)] left and Octavian right; reverse [C I V] (Colonia Iulia Viennensis), prow right with superstructure; nice green patina; SOLD


Augustus and Agrippa, 9 - 3 B.C., Colonia Augusta Nemausus, Gaul

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The reverse commemorates the conquest of Egypt in 30 B.C. This theme was probably used at Nemausus because the colony was settled by Egyptian Greeks and veterans from Anthony's army that had surrendered to Octavian at Actium. This was the last of the COL NEM issues, distinguished by the addition of the title P P (Pater Patriae), an honor bestowed to Augustus in 2 B.C.
RP91555. Bronze dupondius, RIC I 158, RPC I 524, SNG Cop 699, SNG Tüb 152, SRCV I 1730, F, well centered, scratches, some porosity, weight 12.194 g, maximum diameter 26.0 mm, die axis 0o, Colonia Augusta Nemausus (Nimes, France) mint, 9 - 3 B.C.; obverse IMP DIVI F, back to back heads of Augustus and Agrippa, Agrippa (on left) head left wearing a rostral crown and laurel wreath, Augustus head right wearing oak wreath, IMP above, DIVI F below; reverse Crocodile right chained to palm tree, wreath with long ties over COL - NEM above, two palms fronds below; from the Maxwell Hunt Collection; SOLD




  




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REFERENCES|

Burnett, A., M. Amandry and P.P. Ripollès. Roman Provincial Coinage I: From the death of Caesar to the death of Vitellius (44 BC-AD 69). (London, 1992 and suppl.).
Lindgren, H. C. Ancient Greek Bronze Coins: European Mints from the Lindgren Collection. (San Mateo, 1989).
Lindgren, H. Ancient Greek Bronze Coins. (Quarryville, 1993).
Sear, D. Greek Imperial Coins and Their Values. (London, 1982).
Sear, D. Roman Coins and Their Values, The Millennium Edition, Volume One, The Republic and the The Twelve Caesars 280 BC - AD 86. (London, 2000).
Sutherland, C.H.V. The Roman Imperial Coinage, Vol. I, From 39 BC to AD 69. (London, 1984).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Denmark, The Royal Collection of Coins and Medals, Danish National Museum, Vol. 8: Egypt, North Africa, Spain - Gaul. (1994).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Deutschland, München Staatlische Münzsammlung, Part 1: Hispania. Gallia Narbonensis. (Berlin, 1968).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Deutschland, Münzsammlung Universität Tübingen, Part 1: Hispania-Sikelia. (Berlin, 1981).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain XII, The Hunterian Museum, University of Glasgow, Part 1: Roman Provincial Coins: Spain?Kingdoms of Asia Minor. (Oxford, 2004).

Catalog current as of Tuesday, September 17, 2019.
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Roman Gaul