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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Budget & Wholesale ▸ Silver Under $100View Options:  |  |  |   

Ancient Silver Coins Under $100

Coins are listed from highest price to lowest. If you are a serious bargain hunter, click the last page first and move backwards to the first page.


Commodus, March or April 177 - 31 December 192 A.D.

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The Temple of Apollo Palatinus, on the Palatine Hill, was dedicated by Octavian on 9 October 28 B.C. in return for vows made for his victories over Sextus Pompeius at the Battle of Naulochus in 36 B.C. and over Mark Antony and Cleopatra at the Battle of Actium 31 B.C. It was built on a site where a lightning bolt had struck. Augustus' private house was directly connected to the terrace of the sanctuary. Ancient sources state the temple had ivory doors and held numerous works of sculpture. The remains were excavated in the 1960s.
RS85050. Silver denarius, Szaivert MIR 18 p.165, 805; BMCRE IV 271, pl. 97, 17 (aureus); RIC III 197 (S) var. (obv. leg.), RSC II 30 var. (same), Hunter II - (clv), F, dark deposits, rough, lamination defects, edge cracks, weight 2.082 g, maximum diameter 17.4 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 189 A.D.; obverse M COMM ANT P FEL AVG BRIT P P, laureate head right; reverse APOLLINI PALATINO, Apollo Palatinus standing facing, head right, laureate and wearing long robe, plectrum in right hand, lyre resting on a column in left hand; there were only two specimens of this type in the Reka Devnia Hoard, and there are none on coin archives.; extremely rare; $100.00 (85.00)


Persian Empire, Philistia (Gaza or Samaria), c. 375 - 333 B.C., Imitative of Athens

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A Persian Period imitation of Athenian types from the Holy Land. In the past these coins were all attributed to Gaza, however, recent hoard finds indicate a mint at Ashkelon probably also struck this type. It is likely that at least several small mints struck these imitative types.
JD86845. Silver hemiobol, cf. Samaria Hoard pls. 50 - 51, SH306 ff.; SNG ANS 20, gF, toned, die wear, rough/porous, irregular flan, edge chips, weight 0.216 g, maximum diameter 6.6 mm, die axis 270o, Gaza(?) mint, c. 375 - 333 B.C.; obverse head of Athena right, wearing crested Attic helmet with three olive leaves over visor and a spiral palmette on the bowl, hair in parallel bands, very large eye in profile; reverse owl standing right, wings closed, head facing, olive spray with one olive between two leaves behind (no crescent visible), AΘE downward on right (off flan), all in incuse square; ex Beast Coins; $100.00 (85.00)


Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D.

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The reverse announces that Septimius has completed vows (prayers and sacrifices) to ask the gods for 20 years of rule. In a religious context, votum, plural vota, is a vow or promise made to a deity. The word comes from the past participle of voveo, vovere; as the result of the verbal action, a vow, or promise. The votum is an aspect of the contractual nature of Roman religion and sacrifice, a bargaining expressed by "do ut des" (I give that you might give).
RS87222. Silver denarius, RIC IV 308, RSC III 791, BMCRE V 375, Hunter III 103, SRCV II 6393, VF, well centered, toned, tiny edge cracks, weight 3.624 g, maximum diameter 19.0 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 201 - 210 A.D.; obverse SEVERVS PIVS AVG, laureate head right; reverse VOTA SVSCEPTA XX, Severus (his pointy beard well visible) sacrificing left over a lit tripod altar; $100.00 (85.00)


Julia Mamaea, Augusta 13 March 222 - February or March 235 A.D.

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The palladium, a small figure of Minerva (Pallas Athena) holding a spear and shield, had a mythological origin from Troy. Troy was believed to be safe from foreign enemies as long as the palladium remained within the city walls. But Odysseus and Diomedes stole the image and soon after the Greeks took the city. The palladium was later taken by Aeneas to Rome where for centuries it was kept in the temple of Vesta in the Forum. In Late Antiquity, it was rumored that Constantine had taken the palladium to Constantinople and buried it under the Column of Constantine.
RS87249. Silver denarius, RIC IV 360; RSC III 81; BMCRE VI p. 152, 381; SRCV II 8217, VF, toned, porous, weight 2.932 g, maximum diameter 19.1 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 226 A.D.; obverse IVLIA MAMAEA AVG, diademed and draped bust right; reverse VESTA, Vesta standing half-left, veiled head left, palladium in right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand; $100.00 (85.00)


Valerian II, Caesar, Early 256 - 258 A.D.

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The infant Jupiter was suckled by the goat Amaltheia on Mount Ida.
RA87831. Silver antoninianus, Gbl MIR 907e, SRCV III 10731, RIC V-1 3, RSC IV 26, Choice VF, some luster, well centered, radiating flow lines, light marks, strike a little weak, edge cracks, weight 3.315 g, maximum diameter 23.0 mm, die axis 180o, Colonia Agrippinensis (Cologne) mint, 1st emission, 257 - 258 A.D.; obverse VALERIANVS CAES, radiate and draped bust right, from behind; reverse IOVI CRESCENTI (to the thriving/growing Jove), child Jupiter riding right on goat, looking back, raising right hand; $100.00 (85.00)


Philip I the Arab, February 244 - End of September 249 A.D.

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Liberality (generosity), being one of the princely virtues and at the same time an understandably very popular quality, appears both as a legend and as a type on a great many Roman imperial coins. These coins usually attest to an occasion when the emperor distributed gifts to the people. Most often a specified sum of money, or sometimes grain, was given to each person. Inscriptions on the coins often included the number of times, I, II, III, up to VIII, that the emperor has displayed his liberality with a distribution.
RS87864. Silver antoninianus, RIC IV 38b, RSC IV 87, Hunter III 21, SRCV III 8937, Choice EF, full circle centering on a broad flan, sharp portrait, flow lines, reverse die wear, weight 4.756 g, maximum diameter 24.9 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 245 A.D.; obverse IMP M IVL PHILIPPVS AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse LIBERALITAS AVGG II (the 2nd liberality [distribution of gifts to the people] by the Emperors), Liberalitas standing half-left, coin counting board in right hand, cornucopia in left hand; ex Beast Coins; $100.00 (85.00)


Cappadocian Kingdom, Ariobarzanes I Philoromaios, c. 96 - 63 B.C.

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Ariobarzanes I was a Cappadocian nobleman of obscure Persian descent. After the Roman Senate rejected the claims of Ariarathes IX, he was made king through a vote of Cappadocian citizens and with the support of the Roman consul Lucius Cornelius Sulla. He ruled a kingdom that was a Roman protectorate but was removed three separate times by Mithridates before not only securing but actually increasing his lands under Pompey in the Third Mithridatic War. He abdicated to make way for the rule of his son Ariobarzanes II.
GS87953. Silver drachm, cf. Simonetta Collection 59; Simonetta 44b; SNGvA 6324; SNG Cop 157; BMC Galatia p. 40, 21; Cohen DCA 460; HGC 7 846, VF, light toning, slightly off center, small edge crack, weight 4.074 g, maximum diameter 17.4 mm, die axis 0o, Mazaka-Eusebeia (Kayseri, Turkey) mint, c. 66 - 65 B.C.; obverse diademed head right; reverse BAΣIΛEΣ APIBAPZANY ΦIΛPΩMAIY (King Ariobarzanes, friend of the Romans), Athena Nikephoros standing left, Nike left extending wreath in Athena's right hand, left hand on grounded shield and spear behind, monogram inner left, obscure date (Λ? = year 30) in exergue; $100.00 (85.00)


Cappadocian Kingdom, Ariobarzanes I Philoromaios, 96 - 63 B.C.

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Ariobarzanes I was a Cappadocian nobleman of obscure Persian descent. After the Roman Senate rejected the claims of Ariarathes IX, he was made king through a vote of Cappadocian citizens and with the support of the Roman consul Lucius Cornelius Sulla. He ruled a kingdom that was a Roman protectorate but was removed three separate times by Mithridates before not only securing but actually increasing his lands under Pompey in the Third Mithridatic War. He abdicated to make way for the rule of his son Ariobarzanes II.
GS87955. Silver drachm, cf. Simonetta 28, Simonetta Collection 41, HGC 7 846 (S), Cohen DCA 460 (78-77 B.C.), BMC Galatia -, SNG Cop -, SNGvA -, VF, toned, tight flan, light bumps and scratches, light deposits, weight 4.105 g, maximum diameter 18.8 mm, die axis 0o, Mazaka-Eusebeia (Kayseri, Turkey) mint, c. 75 - 74 B.C.; obverse diademed head right; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ APIOBAPZANOY ΦIΛOPΩMAIOY (King Ariobarzanes, friend of the Romans), Athena Nikephoros slightly left, head left, Nike offering wreath in Athena's right hand, resting left hand on grounded shield with spear behind, monogram inner left, KA (year 21) in exergue (off flan); $100.00 (85.00)


Cappadocian Kingdom, Ariobarzanes I Philoromaios, 96 - 63 B.C.

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Ariobarzanes I was a Cappadocian nobleman of obscure Persian descent. After the Roman Senate rejected the claims of Ariarathes IX, he was made king through a vote of Cappadocian citizens and with the support of the Roman consul Lucius Cornelius Sulla. He ruled a kingdom that was a Roman protectorate but was removed three separate times by Mithridates before not only securing but actually increasing his lands under Pompey in the Third Mithridatic War. He abdicated to make way for the rule of his son Ariobarzanes II.
GS87956. Silver drachm, Simonetta Collection 53b, Simonetta 38e; cf. BMC Galatia p. 40, 23 (date off flan); Cohen DCA 460 (71/70 B.C.); HGC 7 846; SNGvA -, aVF, well centered, toned, light marks and scratches, weight 4.138 g, maximum diameter 17.1 mm, die axis 0o, Mazaka-Eusebeia (Kayseri, Turkey) mint, 68 - 67 B.C.; obverse diademed head right; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ APIBAPZANY ΦIΛPΩMAIY (King Ariobarzanes, friend of the Romans), Athena Nikephoros slightly left, head left, Nike offering wreath in Athena's right hand, resting left hand on grounded shield with spear behind, monogram inner left, KH (year 28) in exergue; $100.00 (85.00)


Miletos, Ionia, c. Late 6th Century B.C.

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One of the earliest coins struck in silver.
GA87962. Silver 1/12 stater, SNG Kayhan 462; SNG Cop 952; BMC Ionia p. 186, 34; SGCV II 3533, gVF, obverse off center, mild crackling, weight 1.221 g, maximum diameter 10.2 mm, Miletos (near Balat, Turkey) mint, c. late 6th century B.C.; obverse forepart of lion left, head turned back right; reverse ornamental pattern in incuse square; $100.00 (85.00)




  



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Silver Under $100