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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Greek Coins| ▸ |Geographic - All Periods| ▸ |Macedonia| ▸ |Philippi||View Options:  |  |  |   

Philippi, Macedonia

Philippi was established by Philip II of Macedonia on the site of the Thasian colony of Krinides. It was founded to take control of the neighboring gold mines and control the route between Amphipolis and Neapolis. Philip constructed fortifications to control the passage, sent colonists, and established a mint in the city. Philippi preserved its autonomy until it was fully integrated into the Macedonian Kingdom under Philip V. Mark Antony and Octavian defeated the assassins of Caesar, Marcus Junius Brutus and Cassius, at the Battle of Philippi in the plain to the west of the city in October 42 B.C. They released some of their veteran soldiers, probably from legion XXVIII, to colonize the city, which was refounded as Colonia Victrix Philippensium. In 30 B.C., Octavian reorganized the colony, and established more settlers there, veterans possibly from the Praetorian Guard and other Italians. The city was renamed Colonia Iulia Philippensis, and then Colonia Augusta Iulia Philippensis after January, 27 B.C., when Octavian received the title Augustus from the Roman Senate.


Augustus, 16 January 27 B.C. - 19 August 14 A.D., Philippi, Macedonia

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RPC notes, the mature portrait indicates this type was struck in the second half of Augustus' reign.
RP83474. Bronze AE 24, RPC I 1650, SNG Cop 283, SNG ANS 683, McClean 3269, Grant FITA 275, F, nice portrait, weight 11.562 g, maximum diameter 24.3 mm, die axis 0o, Philippi (near Filippoi, Greece) mint, c. 9 B.C. - 14 A.D.; obverse COL AVG IVL PHILIVSSV, laureate head of Augustus right; reverse AVG DIVI F upward on left, DIVO IVL upward on left, three bases, on the larger middle base, a statue of Augustus, on left, standing left in military dress and statue of Divi Julius Caesar standing left behind him wearing a toga, both raising right hand in salute; SOLD


Philippi, Macedonia, 41 - 68 A.D.

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This coin has traditionally been attributed to Augustus, but due to its copper composition, RPC attributes it as likely from Claudius to Nero; Philippi probably did not issue copper coins during the reign of Augustus.
RP66889. Bronze AE 17, RPC I 1651, SNG ANS 674, SNG Cop 305, Varbanov III 3229, BMC Macedonia 23, AMNG III 14, gVF, weight 3.724 g, maximum diameter 17.4 mm, die axis 180o, Philippi (near Filippoi, Greece) mint, 41 - 68 A.D.; obverse Victory standing left on base, raising wreath in right hand, palm frond in left hand over left shoulder, VIC - AVG divided across field; reverse COHOR PRAE PHIL, three standards; nice example of the type; SOLD


Claudius, 25 January 41 - 13 October 54 A.D., Philippi, Macedonia

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Claudius was a capable, yet unlikely emperor. Before coming to power he was shunned as an idiot due to a limp and stutter. After Caligula's murder, the Praetorian Guard found him hiding in fear. He was expecting to be murdered but was instead proclaimed emperor. He governed well and conquered Britain.
RP01648. Bronze AE 28, RPC I 1653, Varbanov III 3774; SNG ANS 684, SNG Cop 3074, BMC Macedonia 24, AMNG III 17, Lindgren 1127, Moushmov 6923, gVF, weight 7.81 g, maximum diameter 27.6 mm, die axis 180o, Philippi (near Filippoi, Greece) mint, 41 - 56 A.D.; obverse TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG P M TR P IMP, bare head left; reverse COLA VGIVL PHILIP, cipppus, inscribed DIVVS AVG in two lines, on which statues of Augustus to left and Caesar to right, altar on either side of cippus; SOLD


Philippi, Macedonia, 41 - 68 A.D.

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This type has traditionally been attributed to Augustus, but due to its copper composition, RPC attributes it as likely from Claudius to Nero; Philippi probably did not issue copper coins during the reign of Augustus.
RP91198. Bronze AE 20, RPC I 1651, SNG ANS 674, SNG Cop 305, Varbanov III 3229, BMC Macedonia 23, AMNG III 14, Choice gVF, well centered, nice dark green patina, weight 4.749 g, maximum diameter 19.9 mm, die axis 180o, Philippi (near Filippoi, Greece) mint, 41 - 68 A.D.; obverse Victory standing left on base, raising wreath in right hand, palm frond in left hand over left shoulder, VIC - AVG divided across field; reverse COHOR PRAE PHIL, three standards; SOLD


Philippi, Macedonia, c. 356 - 345 B.C.

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Philippi was established by Philip II of Macedonia on the site of the Thasian colony of Krinides. It was founded to take control of the neighboring gold mines and control the route between Amphipolis and Neapolis. Philip constructed fortifications to control the passage, sent colonists, and established a mint in the city. Philippi preserved its autonomy until it was fully integrated into the Macedonian Kingdom under Philip V.
GB90394. Bronze AE 17, Bellinger Philippi 10; SNG Cop 297; BMC Macedonia p. 97, 16; SNG ANS 658 - 659 var. (control symbols), VF, beautiful green patina, attractive Herakles head, weight 6.039 g, maximum diameter 17.2 mm, die axis 225o, Macedonia, Philippi (near Filippoi, Greece) mint, time of Philip II, c. 356 - 345 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles left, clad in lion's skin headdress; reverse tripod lebes with three loop handles, M and stalk of grain left, ΦIΛIΠΠΩN downward on right; SOLD


Augustus, 16 January 27 B.C. - 19 August 14 A.D., Philippi, Macedonia

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Philippi was founded by Philip II of Macedonia to control the neighboring gold mines and the route between Amphipolis and Neapolis. Philip constructed fortifications, sent colonists, and established a mint in the city. Mark Antony and Octavian defeated the assassins of Caesar, Marcus Junius Brutus and Cassius, at the Battle of Philippi west of the city in October 42 B.C. They released some of their veterans to colonize the city, which was refounded as Colonia Victrix Philippensium. In 30 B.C., Octavian reorganized the colony with more Italian settlers, veterans possibly from the Praetorian Guard. The city was renamed Colonia Iulia Philippensis, and then Colonia Augusta Iulia Philippensis after January, 27 B.C., when Octavian received the title Augustus from the Roman Senate.
RP71608. Bronze AE 19, RPC I 1656; Varbanov III 3770 (R4); BMC Mysia p. 103, 86 (Parium); SNG Cop IV 282 (same), aVF, weight 4.985 g, maximum diameter 19.1 mm, die axis 180o, Philippi (near Filippoi, Greece) mint, obverse AVG, bare head right; reverse two priests with yoke of two oxen right, plowing the pomerium (sacred boundary), founding the new colony; SOLD


Augustus, 16 January 27 B.C. - 19 August 14 A.D., Uncertain (Philippi?), Macedonia

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Howgego notes the capricorn was a standard type for Parium. The capricorn was a symbol of Augustus and was probably adopted as a symbol of the city after a Augustan refoundation of the colonia. Howgego notes that the capricorn countermarks on the colonist plowing types may have indicated a devaluation of the coins.
RP85357. Bronze AE 19, RPC I 1656.43 (same countermark); SNG Cop 282; Varbanov 3770 (R4); McClean 7660 (Tiberius); SNG BnF 1439 (Parium, Mysia); c/m: Howgego 302 (Parium), gF, c/m: VF; scratches, corrosion, earthen deposits, reverse flattened by counter-marking, weight 3.861 g, maximum diameter 17.8 mm, die axis 0o, Uncertain (Philippi (near Filippoi, Greece)?) mint, 16 Jan 27 B.C. - 19 Aug 14 A.D.; obverse AVG, bare head right; c/m Capricorn right in rectangular punch; reverse two priests with yoke of two oxen right, plowing the pomerium (sacred boundary), founding the new colony; rare with countermark; SOLD


Philippi, Macedonia, 41 - 68 A.D.

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This coin has traditionally been attributed to Augustus, but due to its copper composition, RPC attributes it as likely from Claudius to Nero; Philippi probably did not issue copper coins during the reign of Augustus.
RP83476. Bronze AE 23, RPC I 1651, SNG ANS 674, SNG Cop 305, Varbanov III 3229, BMC Macedonia 23, AMNG III 14, VF, centered on a tight flan, grainy green patina, small edge cracks, weight 4.619 g, maximum diameter 22.6 mm, die axis 0o, Philippi (near Filippoi, Greece) mint, 41 - 68 A.D.; obverse VIC - AVG, Victory standing left on base, raising wreath in right hand, palm frond in left hand over left shoulder; reverse COHOR PRAE PHIL, three standards; SOLD


Philippi, Macedonia, 41 - 68 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
This coin has traditionally been attributed to Augustus, but due to its copper composition, RPC attributes it as likely from Claudius to Nero; Philippi probably did not issue copper coins during the reign of Augustus.
RP90685. Copper AE 21, RPC I 1651; Varbanov III 3229; SGICV 32; SNG Cop 305; AMNG III 14; BMC Macedonia p. 98, 23, VF, full inscriptions, toned bare copper, some light corrosion, weight 4.288 g, maximum diameter 20.9 mm, die axis 180o, Philippi (near Filippoi, Greece) mint, 41 - 68 A.D.; obverse VIC - AVG, Victory standing left on base, raising wreath in right hand, palm frond in left hand over left shoulder; reverse COHOR PRAE PHIL, three standards; SOLD


Philippi, Macedonia, c. 356 - 345 B.C.

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Lindgren does not note the K above left but traces of it seem to be present on the plate image.
GB56082. Bronze AE 16, Lindgren 119 corr(?); BMC Macedonia p. 97, 10 corr(?) (H right); SNG ANS 666 var. (Γ over grain ear); Bellinger Philippi p. 40 var. (BMC coin), VF, weight 4.411 g, maximum diameter 16.7 mm, die axis 180o, Philippi (near Filippoi, Greece) mint, time of Philip II, c. 356 - 345 B.C.; obverse Herakles' head right, clad in Nemean lion scalp headdress; reverse ΦIΛIΠΠΩN, tripod lebes, K over grain ear left, HA monogram right; SOLD




  




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REFERENCES|

Bellinger, A. "Philippi in Macedonia" in ANSMN 11 (1964).
Burnett, A., M. Amandry & P. Ripolls. Roman Provincial Coinage I: From the death of Caesar to the death of Vitellius (44 BC-AD 69). (London, 1992 and suppl.).
Gaebler, H. Die antiken Mnzen von Makedonia und Paionia, Die antiken Mnzen Nord-Griechenlands Vol. III. (Berlin, 1906).
Head, B. British Museum Catalogue of Greek Coins, Macedonia, etc. (London, 1879).
Lindgren, H. Ancient Greek Bronze Coins: European Mints. (San Mateo, 1989).
Lindgren, H. Ancient Greek Bronze Coins. (Quarryville, 1993).
Moushmov, N. Ancient Coins of the Balkan Peninsula. (1912).
Sear, D. Greek Coins and Their Values, Vol. 1: Europe. (London, 1978).
Sear, D. Greek Imperial Coins and Their Values. (London, 1982).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Denmark, The Royal Collection of Coins and Medals, Danish National Museum, Vol. 2: Macedonia and Thrace. (West Milford, NJ, 1982).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, USA, The Collection of the American Numismatic Society, Part 7: Macedonia 1 (Cities, Thraco-Macedonian Tribes, Paeonian kings). (New York, 1997).
Varbanov, I. Greek Imperial Coins And Their Values, Vol. III: Thrace (from Perinthus to Trajanopolis), Chersonesos Thraciae, Insula Thraciae, Macedonia. (Bourgas, 2007).

Catalog current as of Tuesday, October 15, 2019.
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Philippi, Macedonia