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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Byzantine Coins ▸ Byzantine Mints ▸ AlexandriaView Options:  |  |  | 

Byzantine Alexandria (c. 525 - 646)

The long closed mint at Alexandria reopened during the reign of Justin I. The great metropolis was lost to the Arabs in 646 and was never recovered by the Byzantine Empire.


Sasanian Empire, Khusro II, Occupation of Egypt, 618 - 628 A.D.

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During his temporary domination of Egypt, 618 - 628 A.D., Khusru allowed the Alexandria mint to continue issuing the normal Byzantine coinage, but substituted his portrait for the Byzantine emperor's. The sun and moon replaced the obverse legend, just as on contemporary Sasanian coinage. It may seem strange that a Persian king would wear a crown surmounted by a cross; however, his wife Sira was a Christian, he was a benefactor of the church of St. Sergius in Edessa, he honored the Virgin, and he sometimes wore a robe embroidered with a cross which he had received as a gift from the Emperor Maurice Tiberius. The Byzantine emperors resumed the imperial coinage of Alexandria after their recapture of Egypt in 628 A.D.
WA77071. Bronze 12 nummi, DOC II, part 1, 191; Hahn MIB 202b; Wroth BMC 277; Tolstoi 109; Ratto 1316; Morrisson BnF 10/Al/AE/32; SBCV 855; Sommer 11.92, aVF, as-found slightly rough near black patina, well centered, weight 10.428 g, maximum diameter 18.2 mm, die axis 180o, Alexandria mint, 618 - 628 A.D.; obverse bust of the Sassanid King Khusru II wearing a crown with pendilia and surmounted by a cross, star left, crescent moon right; reverse large I B with cross potent on globe between, AΛEZ in exergue; from the J. Berlin Caesarea Collection, Caesarea Maritima surface find; $120.00 (106.80)


Byzantine Empire, Heraclius & Heraclius Constantine, 23 January 613 - 11 January 641 A.D.

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The Byzantine-Sassanid War ended with a Byzantine victory in 628, but the war, after a century of nearly continuous conflict, left both empires crippled. The Persians suffering economic decline, heavy taxation, religious unrest, dynastic turmoil and other social problems, plunged into civil war. The Byzantines had exhausted their treasure, the Balkans had been largely lost to the Slavs, and Anatolia was devastated. Neither empire was given any chance to recover, as within a few years they were struck by the onslaught of the Arabs, newly united by Islam. The Sassanid Empire would soon be completely destroyed. The Muslim conquest of Syria, Egypt and North Africa, would reduce the Byzantine Empire to a territorial rump consisting of Anatolia and a scatter of islands and footholds in the Balkans and Italy.
BZ77963. Bronze 12 nummi, DOC II, part 1, 189; Wroth BMC 289, Tolstoi 308; Ratto 1445; Morrisson BnF 10/A1/AE/01; Hahn MIB 200a; SBCV 853; Sommer 11.91, F, highlighting buff earthen fill, flan crack, weight 5.090 g, maximum diameter 15.9 mm, die axis 180o, Egypt, Alexandria mint, c. 613 - 618 A.D.; obverse dm HERACL (or similar), facing busts of Heraclius and his son Heraclius Constantine; reverse large IB (12 nummi) divided by cross potent on two steps, AΛEZ (Alexandria) in exergue; from the Butte College Foundation, ex Lindgren; $36.00 (32.04)


Byzantine Empire, Justin II, 15 November 565 - 5 October 578 A.D.

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Justin was unable to hold the territory Justinian had restored. Most of Italy and parts of Spain were quickly lost to the Lombards and Visigoths. Refusal to pay tribute to the Sassanids, resulted in protracted war. The burdens of office drove him insane and his successor was regent for the last four years of his reign.
SH90893. Gold solidus, Hahn MIB II 14 (Alexandria), SBCV 347A (Constantinople, but Alexandria noted as a possibility), Berk 63, DOC I -, aEF, small marks and scratches, weight 4.473 g, maximum diameter 20.6 mm, die axis 180o, Alexandria mint, c. 567 - 578 A.D.; obverse D N I-VSTI-NVS PP AVG, facing helmeted and cuirassed bust, Victory on globe in right, shield on left arm; reverse VICTORI-A AVCCC I, Constantinopolis enthroned facing, head right, long scepter in right hand, globus cruciger in left hand, staurogram left, CONOB in exergue; ex Heritage auction 3020 (6 Sep 2012), lot 25312; ex Nudelman Numismatica 10 (13 Jun 2011), lot 53; very rare; SOLD







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Catalog current as of Tuesday, September 19, 2017.
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Byzantine Alexandria