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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Byzantine Coins| ▸ |Byzantine Mints| ▸ |Rome||View Options:  |  |  | 

Byzantine Rome (c. 540 - 775)

The Rome mint reopened about 540, after Justinian's conquests in Italy. It closed during the reign of Constantine V (741- 775).

Germanicus, b. 24 May 15 B.C. - d. 10 Oct 19 A.D., Issued by Caligula

|Germanicus|, |Germanicus,| |b.| |24| |May| |15| |B.C.| |-| |d.| |10| |Oct| |19| |A.D.,| |Issued| |by| |Caligula||dupondius|NEW
This type was issued by Caligula in honor of his deceased father. Germanicus Caesar was the son of Tiberius' brother Drusus Sr. and Antonia the daughter of Mark Antony and Octavia. He distinguished himself on the battlefield many times, most notably in Germania where he inflicted serious defeats on the barbarian tribes and recovered the legionary standards lost in the catastrophic Varus disaster. He was chosen Tiberius' successor, but died of an unknown cause. His tremendous popularity helped his son Caius (Caligula) obtain the throne after Tiberius died.
RB97745. Orichalcum dupondius, RIC I Gaius 57, BMCRE I Gaius 93, BnF II Caligula 140, Hunter I Gaius 37, Cohen I 7, SRCV I 1820, gF, scattered mild pitting, weight 12.208 g, maximum diameter 29.0 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 37 - 41 A.D.; obverse Germanicus in slow quadriga right, bare-headed, wearing paludamentum, eagle-tipped scepter in left hand, chariot ornamented with Victory and wreath, GERMANICVS / CAESAR in two lines above horses; reverse Germanicus standing left, bare-headed, wearing cuirass and short tunic, cloak over left arm, right leg bent, raising right hand, aquila (legionary eagle) in left hand, SIGNIS - RECEPT / DEVICTIS - GERM (standards recovered from the defeated Germans) in two divided lines across the field at center, S - C (senatus consulto) flanking low; ex Roma Numismatics e-sale 78 (17 Dec 2020), lot 1296, ex Lucernae prima auction (2 Jun 2020), lot 212; $500.00 (€460.00)
 


Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D.

|Septimius| |Severus|, |Septimius| |Severus,| |9| |April| |193| |-| |4| |February| |211| |A.D.||denarius|
The flattering appellation "the restorer of the city" was doubtless given not for either rebuilding or embellishing Rome, but rather for restoring the honor of the "Eternal City" by avenging the death of Pertinax, securing domestic tranquility to the empire, and reestablishing respect for the Roman name by victories over the Parthians.
RS97469. Silver denarius, RIC IV 167a, BMCRE V 194, RSC III 599; Hunter III 41; SRCV II 6357, Choice VF, excellent centering and strike, nice portrait, light toning, tiny edge cracks, weight 3.352 g, maximum diameter 18.2 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 201 A.D.; obverse SEVERVS AVG PART MAX, laureate head right; reverse RESTITVTOR VRBIS (the restorer of the city), Severus standing left in military attire, sacrificing over flaming tripod altar from patera in right hand, inverted spear vertical behind in left hand; ex Savoca Coins auction blue 89 (07 Nov 2020), lot 1287; $170.00 (€156.40)
 


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D.

|Hadrian|, |Hadrian,| |11| |August| |117| |-| |10| |July| |138| |A.D.||semis|
Most references list this type as a quadrans but examples without patina appear to be orichalcum (brass) vice copper. Yellow brass indicates the type is a semis. This coin has a near black patina, which is more common on brass than on bronze or copper, and the few spots of bare metal do look to be brass.
RB97458. Orichalcum semis, RIC II 625 (S), BMCRE III 1279, Cohen II 1167 (5 fr.), SRCV II 3704, Strack II 579, Hunter II 380 var. (eagle left, head right), gVF, very attractive eagle, slightly rough, weight 3.352 g, maximum diameter 17.9 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 120 - 123 A.D.; obverse IMP CAESAR TRAIAN HADRIANVS AVG, eagle standing half right, head turned left, wings open but not spread; reverse P M TR P COS III, horizontal winged thunderbolt, S C (senatus consulto) below; ex Savoca Coins auction blue 89 (8 Nov 2020), lot 1243; scarce; $150.00 (€138.00)
 


Julia Mamaea, Augusta 13 March 222 - February or March 235 A.D.

|Julia| |Domna|, |Julia| |Mamaea,| |Augusta| |13| |March| |222| |-| |February| |or| |March| |235| |A.D.||sestertius|NEW
Hera (Juno to the Romans) is the wife and one of three sisters of Zeus in the Olympian pantheon of Greek mythology and religion. Hera's mother is Rhea and her father Cronus. Her chief function was as the goddess of women and marriage. The cow, lion and the peacock were considered sacred to her. Portrayed as majestic and solemn, often enthroned, and crowned with the kalathos. Hera was known for her jealous and vengeful nature against Zeus' lovers and offspring, but also against mortals who crossed her. Paris earned Hera's hatred by choosing Aphrodite as the most beautiful goddess.
RB92608. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC IV SA683, BMCRE VI SA759, Hunter III 38, Cohen IV 33, SRCV II 8230, VF, rough green patina, patina flaking, porosity, earthen deposits, edge cracks, weight 21.460 g, maximum diameter 32.1 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, c. 231 A.D.; obverse IVLIA MAMAEA AVGVSTA, draped bust right, wearing stephane; reverse IVNO AVGVSTAE, Juno seated left, flower in right hand, swathed infant in crook of left arm, S C (senatus consulto) in exergue; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $140.00 (€128.80)
 


Severus Alexander, 13 March 222 - March 235 A.D.

|Severus| |Alexander|, |Severus| |Alexander,| |13| |March| |222| |-| |March| |235| |A.D.||sestertius|NEW
Sol Invictus ("Unconquered Sun") was the sun god of the later Roman Empire and a patron of soldiers. In 274 the Roman emperor Aurelian made it an official cult alongside the traditional Roman cults. The god was favored by emperors after Aurelian and appeared on their coins until Constantine. The last inscription referring to Sol Invictus dates to 387 and there were enough devotees in the 5th century that Augustine found it necessary to preach against them. The date 25 December was selected for Christmas to replace the popular Roman festival Dies Natalis Solis Invicti, the "Birthday of the Unconquered Sun."
RB92605. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC IV 513, BMCRE VI 771, SRCV II 7999, Cohen IV 415, Hunter III -, VF, well centered, brown tone, edge cracks, weight 19.847 g, maximum diameter 31.1 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, late 231 A.D.; obverse IMP ALEXANDER PIVS AVG, laureate bust right from behind right shoulder; reverse P M TR P X COS III P P, Sol advancing slightly left, head left, radiate, nude but for chlamys over shoulders and left arm, raising right hand commanding the sun to rise, whip in left hand, S - C across field at center; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $130.00 SALE |PRICE| $117.00 ON RESERVE


Gallienus, August 253 - September 268 A.D.

|Gallienus|, |Gallienus,| |August| |253| |-| |September| |268| |A.D.||antoninianus|
Security was only wishful thinking when this coin was struck. There were so many invasions in the next few years that they confused the ancient sources and much of the history is lost. In 267, the Goths sacked several cities in southern Greece including Athens, Corinth, Argos and Sparta. Gallienus defeated them, but the Alamanni would come the year after.
RA94176. Billon antoninianus, Göbl MIR 595a, RSC IV 961a, RIC V-1 S280, SRCV III 10359, Hunter IV S77, VF, encrustations, tight ragged flan, parts of legends weak/off flan, weight 2.619 g, maximum diameter 20.1 mm, die axis 180o, 8th officina, Rome mint, 264 - 267 A.D.; obverse GALLIENVS AVG, radiate head right; reverse SECVRIT PERPET (everlasting security), Securitas standing slightly left, legs crossed, head left, long scepter in right hand, leaning with left arm on column, H right; ; $50.00 (€46.00)
 


Gallienus, August 253 - September 268 A.D.

|Gallienus|, |Gallienus,| |August| |253| |-| |September| |268| |A.D.||antoninianus|
The "zoo series" of coins calling on Diana to protect the Emperor was struck late in Gallienus' reign. His father, Valerian, had been particularly dedicated to the worship of Diana the Preserver and had dedicated a temple to her at Rome. Diana apparently did not favor Gallienus. Not long after this coin was struck, he was assassinated near Milan while attempting to deal with the usurper Aureolus.
RA94199. Billon antoninianus, Göbl MIR 747b, RIC V-1 S181, RIC IV 162, SRCV III 10200, VF, nice portrait, tight flan cutting off part of legends, tiny edge splits, weight 2.964 g, maximum diameter 19.7 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 267 - Sep 268 A.D.; obverse GALLIENVS AVG, radiate bust right; reverse DIANAE CONS AVG (to Diana protector of the Emperor), antelope standing right, XI in exergue; $50.00 (€46.00)
 


Gallienus, August 253 - September 268 A.D.

|Gallienus|, |Gallienus,| |August| |253| |-| |September| |268| |A.D.||antoninianus|NEW
During the siege of Milan, at a late hour but while he was still lingering with pleasures of the table, a false alarm was suddenly given, that Aureolus, at the head of all his forces, had made a desperate sally from the town. Gallienus, who was never deficient in personal bravery, started from his silken couch, and without allowing himself time either to put on his armor, or to assemble his guards, he mounted on horseback, and rode full speed towards the supposed place of the attack. Ambushed by enemies among his own officers, amidst the nocturnal tumult he received a mortal wound from an uncertain hand.
RA94204. Billon antoninianus, Göbl MIR 375x, RIC V-1 S325, RSC IV 1288, SRCV III -, Hunter IV -, Choice F, well centered, edge splits, weight 3.590 g, maximum diameter 22.3 mm, die axis 225o, Rome mint, 260 - 261 A.D.; obverse GALLIENVS AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse VIRTVS AVG (the valor of the Emperor), Mars standing left, wearing helmet and military garb, right resting hand on grounded shield, spear vertical behind in left, VI right; $38.00 (€34.96)
 


Gallienus, August 253 - September 268 A.D.

|Gallienus|, |Gallienus,| |August| |253| |-| |September| |268| |A.D.||antoninianus|NEW
This type commemorates vows made to Apollo invoking his protection against the revolt of Aureolus. During the siege of Milan, at a late hour but while he was still lingering with pleasures of the table, a false alarm was suddenly given, reporting that Aureolus, at the head of all his forces, had made a desperate sally from the town. Gallienus, who was never deficient in personal bravery, started from his silken couch, and without allowing himself time either to put on his armor or to assemble his guards, he mounted on horseback and rode full speed towards the supposed place of the attack. There he was ambushed by enemies from among his own officers. Amidst the nocturnal tumult, he received a mortal wound from an uncertain hand. Perhaps his request to Apollo was too specific and asked only for protection from Aureolus?

The centaur Chiron was the tutor of Apollo and the first to teach him the medicinal use of herbs. The exact meaning of the globe and rudder are more obscure but likely allude to Apollo assisting Gallienus in steering the "ship of state."
RA94210. Billon antoninianus, Göbl MIR 738b, RIC V-1 S164, RSC IV 73, Hunter IV 99 corr. (says trophy vice rudder), SRCV III 10178, aVF, tight flan cutting off part of reverse legend, centers weak, light deposits, weight 2.345 g, maximum diameter 19.8 mm, die axis 180o, 8th officina, Rome mint, 267 - Sep 268 A.D.; obverse GALLIENVS AVG, radiate bust right; reverse APOLLINI CONS AVG (to Apollo the preserver of the Emperor), centaur Chiron walking left, globe in right hand, rudder in left hand, H in exergue; $36.00 (€33.12)
 


Gallienus, August 253 - September 268 A.D.

|Gallienus|, |Gallienus,| |August| |253| |-| |September| |268| |A.D.||antoninianus|NEW
The "zoo series" of coins calling on Diana to protect the Emperor was struck late in Gallienus' reign. His father, Valerian, had been particularly dedicated to the worship of Diana the Preserver and had dedicated a temple to her at Rome. Diana apparently did not favor Gallienus. Not long after this coin was struck, he was assassinated near Milan while attempting to deal with the usurper Aureolus.
RA94203. Billon antoninianus, Göbl MIR 728b, RIC V-1 S177, RSC IV 154, SRCV III 10199 var. (IMP GALLIENVS AVG), aVF, rough corrosion, reverse a little off center, weight 3.035 g, maximum diameter 21.7 mm, die axis 0o, 5th officina, Rome mint, 267 - Sep 268 A.D.; obverse GALLIENVS AVG, radiate head right; reverse DIANAE CONS AVG (to Diana protector of the Emperor), doe walking right, head turned back left, E (5th officina) in exergue; $24.00 (€22.08)
 







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