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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Byzantine Coins| ▸ |Byzantine Mints| ▸ |Carthage||View Options:  |  |  |   

Byzantine Carthage (c. 533 - 695)

The Carthage mint reopened in 533 or 534 after Justinian's conquests. Carthage was lost to the Arabs, c 695.


Byzantine Empire, Heraclius, 5 October 610 - 11 January 641 A.D.

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Certificate of Authenticity issued by David R. Sear.

The most likely occasion for this issue would have been Martina's coronation in 614 A.D. Based on the number of surviving specimens, production may have continued for several years. Martina was extensively featured on the copper coinage of Heraclius from c. 615 to c. 629 A.D. Rynearson identifies this type as scarce.
SH06184. Silver half siliqua, SBCV 871; DOC II part 1, 233; Hahn MIB 149; Wroth BMC 343-6; Tolstoi 319-20; Ratto 1460-64; Morrisson BnF 3-11, Choice gVF, weight 0.66 g, maximum diameter 11.6 mm, die axis 100o, Carthage (near Tunis, Tunisia) mint, 614 - 618 A.D.; obverse D N ERACLIO PP AV, bust of Heraclius facing, beardless, wearing cuirass, paludamentum, and crown with pendilia and cross; reverse on left bust of Heraclius Constantine wearing chlamys, tablion, crown with pendilia & cross, on right bust of Martina wearing robes & crown with long pendilia & cross, cross between; from the Woolslayer Collection, ex Edward J. Waddell; scarce; SOLD


Byzantine Empire, Justinian I, 4 April 527 - 14 November 565 A.D.

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The war with the Vandalic Kingdom of Carthage in 533 - 534 was the first of Justinian I's wars of reconquest of the lost Western Roman Empire. The Vandals had occupied Roman North Africa in the early 5th century and established an independent kingdom. The Byzantine expeditionary force landed on the African coast in early September 533. The Vandal king Gelimer met the Byzantine army at the Battle of Ad Decimum, near Carthage, on 13 September. His elaborate plan to encircle and destroy the Byzantines came close to success, but Belisarius forced a Vandal retreat and occupied Carthage. Gelimer withdrew, gathered his remaining strength, and in December advanced towards Carthage and met the Romans at the Battle of Tricamarum. Gelimer was defeated and fled to a remote mountain fortress, where he was blockaded until he surrendered in the spring. Belisarius returned to Constantinople with the Vandals' royal treasure and the captive Gelimer to enjoy a triumph. Africa was formally restored to imperial rule as the praetorian prefecture of Africa. The new province faced war with the Moors and military rebellions, and it was not until 548 that peace was restored and Roman government firmly established.The Vandalic War in 533-534
BZ36374. Bronze follis, SBCV 258, Berk 189, Hahn MIB I 185a, DOC I -, Wroth BMC -, VF, weight 14.988 g, maximum diameter 28.4 mm, die axis 270o, Carthage (near Tunis, Tunisia) mint, 534 - 539 A.D.; obverse D N IVSTINIANVS PP AG, diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse large M (40 nummi), cross above, star left, cross right, three pellets under M, KART in exergue; very rare; SOLD


Byzantine Empire, Justinian I, 4 April 527 - 14 November 565 A.D.

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In 534, Gelimer surrendered to the Byzantine general Belisarius. The Vandal Kingdom of North Africa came to an end and the provinces were returned to Roman (Byzantine) rule. Belisarius would move on to retake Sicily in 535 and then, on 9 December 536, enter the city of Rome.
SH57473. Bronze follis, DOC I 283, Hahn MIB I 185c, Wroth BMC 372 - 275, Tolstoi 297, Ratto 702, Morrisson BnF I 4/Ct/AE/1 - 3, SBCV 257, VF, weight 15.052 g, maximum diameter 27.5 mm, die axis 30o, Carthage (near Tunis, Tunisia) mint, 534 - 539 A.D.; obverse D N IVSTINIANVS PP AG, diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse large M (40 nummi), cross above, star left, cross right, KART in exergue; scarce; SOLD


Non-Imperial Coinages in Africa, "Domino Nostro," c. 5th Century A.D.

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This type has been attributed to the time of Johannes and Boniface in Carthage 423 - 425 A.D., but strong evidence is lacking. We may more safely assume the series is later and copying official issues. The star is probably a crude Christogram or degenerated cross.
ME26375. Bronze half centenionalis, RIC X 3815, F, weight 0.511 g, maximum diameter 19.5 mm, Carthage (near Tunis, Tunisia) mint, obverse DOMINIS NOSTRIS, diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse star in wreath; very rare; SOLD


Byzantine Empire, Justinian I, 4 April 527 - 14 November 565 A.D.

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The war with the Vandalic Kingdom of Carthage in 533 - 534 was the first of Justinian I's wars of reconquest of the lost Western Roman Empire. The Vandals had occupied Roman North Africa in the early 5th century and established an independent kingdom. The Byzantine expeditionary force landed on the African coast in early September 533. The Vandal king Gelimer met the Byzantine army at the Battle of Ad Decimum, near Carthage, on 13 September. His elaborate plan to encircle and destroy the Byzantines came close to success, but Belisarius forced a Vandal retreat and occupied Carthage. Gelimer withdrew, gathered his remaining strength, and in December advanced towards Carthage and met the Romans at the Battle of Tricamarum. Gelimer was defeated and fled to a remote mountain fortress, where he was blockaded until he surrendered in the spring. Belisarius returned to Constantinople with the Vandals' royal treasure and the captive Gelimer to enjoy a triumph. Africa was formally restored to imperial rule as the praetorian prefecture of Africa. The new province faced war with the Moors and military rebellions, and it was not until 548 that peace was restored and Roman government firmly established.The Vandalic War in 533-534
SH82807. Bronze follis, SBCV 261, VF, weight 21.879 g, maximum diameter 38.8 mm, die axis 180o, Carthage (near Tunis, Tunisia) mint, 539 - 540 A.D.; obverse D N IVSTINIANVS P P AVG, helmeted and cuirassed bust facing holding globus cruciger in right, shield decorated with horseman on left shoulder, cross in right field; reverse large mark of value M, between A/N/N/O left and X/III (regnal year 13), cross above, S below (=secunda officina?), CAR in exergue; well centered, green patina, big bronze; rare; SOLD


Byzantine Empire, Justinian I, 4 April 527 - 14 November 565 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
The war with the Vandalic Kingdom of Carthage in 533 - 534 was the first of Justinian I's wars of reconquest of the lost Western Roman Empire. The Vandals had occupied Roman North Africa in the early 5th century and established an independent kingdom. The Byzantine expeditionary force landed on the African coast in early September 533. The Vandal king Gelimer met the Byzantine army at the Battle of Ad Decimum, near Carthage, on 13 September. His elaborate plan to encircle and destroy the Byzantines came close to success, but Belisarius forced a Vandal retreat and occupied Carthage. Gelimer withdrew, gathered his remaining strength, and in December advanced towards Carthage and met the Romans at the Battle of Tricamarum. Gelimer was defeated and fled to a remote mountain fortress, where he was blockaded until he surrendered in the spring. Belisarius returned to Constantinople with the Vandals' royal treasure and the captive Gelimer to enjoy a triumph. Africa was formally restored to imperial rule as the praetorian prefecture of Africa. The new province faced war with the Moors and military rebellions, and it was not until 548 that peace was restored and Roman government firmly established.The Vandalic War in 533-534
SH82809. Bronze follis, SBCV 260, aVF, weight 22.364 g, maximum diameter 40.7 mm, die axis 90o, 2nd officina, Carthage (near Tunis, Tunisia) mint, 539 - 540 A.D.; obverse D N IVSTINIANVS P P AVG, helmeted and cuirassed bust facing holding globus cruciger in right, shield decorated with horseman on left shoulder, cross in right field; reverse large M (40 nummi), between A/N/N/O left and X/III (regnal year 13), cross above, SO below secunda officina), KAR (Carthage) in exergue; rare; SOLD


Byzantine Empire, Justin II and Sophia, 15 November 565 - 5 October 578 A.D.

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Normal examples of this type, without a retrograde mark of value, are rare. Sear notes retrograde examples exist and Paris has the one retrograde example we reference. There is one retrograde example on Coin Archives (from a different reverse die).

Bellinger notes in DOC I, "This issue, which recalls the Victory decanummia of Justinian (supra, Justinian No. 304), struck at the time that Tiberius Constantine was created Caesar, was doubtless intended to celebrate the peace in Africa with which his administration began, by an understandable hyperbole converting peace to victory.
BZ72156. Bronze half follis, Morrisson BnF 33; SBCV 396; DOC I 203 var.; Wroth BMC 266 ff. var.; Sommer 5.56 var.; Hahn MIB I 77 var.; Ratto 910 f. var. (all var. none retrograde), aVF, rough, weight 9.523 g, maximum diameter 24.3 mm, die axis 90o, Carthage mint, 572 - 578 A.D.; obverse D N IVSTINO ET SOFIE AG, Justin (on left) and Sopia seated facing on double throne, cross between them, VITA in exergue; reverse two Victories standing confronted holding between them a shield ornamented with a star, cross above, retrograde K over retrograde MN below; first example of this type handled by Forum!; very rare; SOLD


Byzantine Empire, Justin II, 15 November 565 - 5 October 578 A.D., Carthage Mint

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Rynearson lists Justin II Carthage folles as very rare. This coin was struck on an irregular flan. Examples of this type in Dumbarton Oaks weigh 6.26 to 8.71 grams. considerably less than this example. This coin was probably overstruck on a older larger coin, which was broken to better approximate the desired weight. Ex Harlan Berk and ex Woolslayer collection.
BZ06199. Bronze half follis, DOC I 199, Hahn MIB 76, VF, weight 13.880 g, maximum diameter 26.2 mm, die axis 140o, 2nd officina, Carthage (near Tunis, Tunisia) mint, 572 - 573 A.D.; obverse D N IVSTINO ET SOFIA AC, busts of Justin and Sophia, crowned, facing, VITA (off flan) below exergue line, cross center; reverse large K (20 nummi) between ANNO and VIII (regnal year 8), cross above, S below, KAR in exergue; from the Woolslayer Collection, ex Harlan J. Berk; scarce; SOLD


Vandal Kingdom, North Africa, 427 - 534 A.D.

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The 4 nummi was 1/1000 of a gold tremisis.

In spring 429, the Vandals invaded North Africa. Under the influence of his rival general AŽtius, Valentinian III's mother, Galla Placidia, had the Roman governor and general Bonifacius convicted of treason. Rather than surrender for execution, Bonifacius revolted and sought support from Vandal mercenaries in Hispania. Bonifacius made peace with Galla Placidia, but it was too late. King Genseric and the entire Vandal kingdom migrated en masse into Africa and took it with a force of 80,000 men. The Vandals would rule North Africa until the Eastern Romans (Byzantines) recaptured it in 534.
ME89613. Bronze 4 nummi, MEC I 51 - 56 (Carthage semi-autonomous municipal coinage); BMC Vandals p. 7, 12 - 14 (Hunneric, 477 - 484 A.D.); MIB I 20 (Gelimer, 530 - 533 A.D.), VF, highlighting red earthen deposits, reverse slightly off center, weight 1.161 g, maximum diameter 11.2 mm, die axis 315o, Carthage (near Tunis, Tunisia) mint, 480 - 533 A.D.; obverse diademed, draped and cuirassed bust left, holding palm frond; reverse N / IIII (mark of value) in two lines across field; ex Roma Numismatics e-sale 53, lot 989 (notes export permit was approved by the Israel Antiquities Authority); rare; SOLD


Byzantine Empire, Maurice Tiberius, 13 August 582 - 22 November 602 A.D.

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Grierson dated Maurice's coins with left facing busts to 602 A.D. because left facing busts were often associated with consulships and Maurice held the consulship that year.
SH11017. Bronze pentanummium, Wroth BMC 246, DOC I 256 (not in the collection, references Wroth), Morrisson BnF 33, Tolstoi 317, Sommer 7.88, Hahn MIB 131, SBCV 570, Ratto -, VF, weight 2.067 g, maximum diameter 16.05 mm, die axis 180o, Carthage (near Tunis, Tunisia) mint, 602 A.D.(?); obverse D N MAV-RICI P, diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust left, IND. S. below (= Indictio VI); reverse palm tree, N-M (nummi) at sides, V (5) below; rare; SOLD




  




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MINTMARKS

CAR
CT
CRTV
KAR
KART
KRTV



Catalog current as of Friday, October 18, 2019.
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Carthage