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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Byzantine Coins| ▸ |Byzantine Mints| ▸ |Carthage||View Options:  |  |  | 

Byzantine Carthage (c. 533 - 695)

The Carthage mint reopened in 533 or 534 after Justinian's conquests. Carthage was lost to the Arabs, c 695.


Carthage, Zeugitana, North Africa, c. 400 - 350 B.C.

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By 400 B.C., Carthage was obsessed with taking Sicily. Over the next sixty years, Carthaginian and Greek forces engaged in a constant series of skirmishes. In 398, Dionysius took the Carthaginian stronghold of Motya. Milch responded by retaking Motya and capturing Messina. Himilco then laid siege to Syracuse itself. He was close to success in 397, but in 396 a plague ravaged the Carthaginian forces and they collapsed. The fighting swung in favor of Carthage in 387. After winning a naval battle off Catania, Himilco laid siege to Syracuse with 50,000 Carthaginians, but yet another epidemic struck down thousands of them. Dionysius' surprise counterattack destroyed all the Carthaginian ships while most of the men were ashore. At the same time, his ground forces stormed the besiegers' lines. Himilco and his chief officers abandoned their army and fled to Carthage in disgrace. He was very badly received and later committed suicide by starving himself. By 340 B.C., Carthage had been pushed entirely into the southwest corner of the island.
GB87739. Bronze AE 16, Alexandropoulos 18, SNG Cop 109 ff., MŁller Afrique 163, SGCV II 6444, VF, toned bare bronze, nice detail, a little rough, weight 2.517 g, maximum diameter 16.2 mm, die axis 180o, Sicilian(?) mint, c. 400 - 350 B.C.; obverse head of Tanit left, wearing barley wreath, triple-pendant earring, and necklace with many pendants; reverse unbridled horse right, date palm tree in center background, three pellets forming a triangle right; SOLD


Carthage, Zeugitana, North Africa, 221 - 210 B.C.

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The Second Punic War, 218 - 201 B.C., is most remembered for Hannibal's crossing of the Alps, followed by his crushing victories over Rome in the battle of the Trebia, at Trasimene, and again at Cannae. After these defeats, many Roman allies joined Carthage, prolonging the war in Italy for over a decade. Against Hannibal's skill on the battlefield, the Romans deployed the Fabian strategy. More capable in siegecraft, the Romans recaptured all the major cities that had defected. The Romans defeated an attempt to reinforce Hannibal at the battle of the Metaurus and, in Iberia, Publius Cornelius Scipio Africanus Major took New Carthage and ended Carthaginian rule over Iberia in the Battle of Ilipa. The final showdown was the Battle of Zama in Africa where Scipio Africanus defeated Hannibal, resulting in the imposition of harsh peace conditions on Carthage, which ceased to be a major power and became a Roman client-state.Hannibal's route of invasion
GB91026. Bronze shekel, cf. Viola CNP106, Alexandropoulos MAA 88, SNG Cop 307, MŁller Afrique 201, F, a couple of casting flaws, weight 7.985 g, maximum diameter 22.2 mm, die axis 270o, Carthage mint, 221 - 210 B.C.; obverse head of Tanit left, hair wreathed with grain; reverse horse standing right, head turned back left; ex Eric J. Engstrom Collection; scarce; SOLD


Byzantine Empire, Justinian II, 10 July 685 - Late 695 and Summer 705 - 4 November 711 A.D.

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The only other example of this variant known to Forum is CNG auction 88, lot 1695 (misdescribed as an ordinary SBCV 1270). All other examples have the K below the H on the left, vice below the Λ on the right. Even the "normal" SBCV 1270 type is missing from the Dumbarton Oaks collection (DOC II 33 refs the Tolstoi coin) and described by Grierson as an extreme rarity.

The cruciform monogram on the obverse left is a monogram of the "God-bearer" (the Virgin Mary). The cruciform monogram on the right is for Justinian.
SH73338. Bronze follis, CNG auction 88, lot 1695 (described as SBCV 1270); cf. SBCV 1270, Tolstoi 81, DOC II 33, Morrisson BnF 15/Ct/AE/03, Hahn MIB 56 (all K below H left), gVF, weight 3.187 g, maximum diameter 19.5 mm, die axis 180o, Carthage mint, 1st reign, c. 694 - 695 A.D.(?); obverse Justinian standing facing, crown with cross and chlamys, globus cruciger in right hand, akakia in left hand, retrograde cruciform ΘEOTOKE BOHΘEI monogram left, cruciform Justinian monogram right; reverse no legend, large M (40 nummi), Justinian monogram above, H (year 8?) left, Λ over K right, KΓω in exergue; extreme rarity, 2nd known; SOLD







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MINTMARKS

CAR
CT
CRTV
KAR
KART
KRTV



Catalog current as of Wednesday, October 16, 2019.
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Carthage