Coins and Antiquities Consignment Shop
  Welcome Guest. Please login or register. All items are guaranteed authentic for eternity! Please call us if you have questions 252-646-1958. Thanks for your business! Welcome Guest. Please login or register. Internet challenged? We are happy to take your order over the phone. Please call if you have questions 252-646-1958. Thanks for your business!

×Catalog Main Menu
Fine Coins Showcase

Antiquities Showcase
Recent Additions
Recent Price Reductions

Show empty categories
Shop Search
Shopping Cart
Contact Us
About Forum
Shopping at Forum
Our Guarantee
Payment Options
Shipping Options & Fees
Privacy & Security
Forum Staff
Selling Your Coins
Identifying Your Coin
FAQs
   View Categories
Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Greek Coins| ▸ |Greek Imperial| ▸ |Gaul||View Options:  |  |  |   

Roman Provincial Coins from Gaul

Augustus and Agrippa, c. 9 - 3 B.C., Colonia Augusta Nemausus, Southern Gaul

Click for a larger photo
The reverse commemorates the conquest of Egypt in 30 B.C. This theme was probably used at Nemausus because the colony was settled by Egyptian Greeks and veterans from Anthony's army that had surrendered to Octavian at Actium.
SH70945. Bronze dupondius, RIC I 158, RPC I 524, SNG Cop 699, SNG Tüb 152, SRCV I 1730, VF, well centered, green patina, flan flaw below busts, weight 13.251 g, maximum diameter 26.4 mm, die axis 315o, Nemausus (Nimes, France) mint, c. 9 - 3 B.C.; obverse IMP DIVI F, back to back heads of Agrippa and Augustus, Agrippa (on left) facing left wearing a rostral crown, Augustus laureate head right; reverse COL NEM, crocodile right chained to a palm, wreath with long ties above, two palm fronds below; ex Roma Numismatics; SOLD


Roman Republic, Dictatorship of Julius Caesar, L Hostilius Saserna, 48 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
The events of 48 B.C. are among the best known of ancient history. Caesar defeated Pompey at Pharsalus and later was greeted at Alexandria with a gift of Pompey's head. The twenty-one-year-old Cleopatra VII had herself delivered to him rolled in a carpet and became his mistress. Caesar and Cleopatra defeated Ptolemy XIII, but during the battle the Library of Alexandria was burned.

This type refers to Caesar's taking of Massilia early in the war with Pompey. Artemis Ephesia was held in special reverence at Massilia, where they had a temple dedicated to her.
RR82689. Silver denarius, Crawford 448/3, Sydenham 953, RSC I Hostilia 4, Sear Imperators 19, BMCRR Rome 3996, SRCV I 419, gVF, attractive toning, light marks, die wear, reverse slightly off center, weight 3.993 g, maximum diameter 18.5 mm, die axis 90o, Rome mint, 48 B.C.; obverse bare head of Gallia right with long disheveled hair, carnyx (Gallic trumpet) behind; reverse cultus statue of Diana (Artemis) of Ephesus standing facing, laureate, long hair falling down her shoulders and long flowing robes, holding stag left by its antlers with her right hand, vertical spear in left hand, SASERNA curving upward on left, L • HOSTILIVS downward on right; ex Gorny and Mosch auction 176 (10 Mar 2009), lot 1962; scarce; SOLD


Gallic Celts, Coriosolites, c. 100 - 50 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
The Coriosolites (or Curiosolites or Curiosolitae) were a Celtic people in the region now called Brittany, mentioned by Julius Caesar several times. He describes the position of the Coriosolites on the ocean among the Armoric states, near the Veneti, Unelli, Osismi, and other tribes. No Coriosolites cities or roads are mentioned by the Romans. The name seems to be preserved in Corseul, a village between Dinan and Lamballe, where there are the remains of an old Roman town. We may conclude that, after the fashion of Gallic names, Corseul was the capital of the Coriosolites.Gaul
CE89570. Billon stater, Delestrée-Tache II 2334, Depeyrot NC VIII 178, gVF, toned, porosity and flan splits, weight 6.442 g, maximum diameter 24.2 mm, die axis 270o, Northwest Gaul mint, c. 100 - 50 B.C.; obverse Celticized head right, hair in large spiral curls, S-like ear; before, small face-like ornament right above scroll-ornament; reverse Celticized rider on horseback right, spiral ornament before, rayed circular ornament below; ex Calgary Coin Gallery; SOLD


Augustus and Agrippa, 10 - 14 A.D., Colonia Augusta Nemausus, Gaul

Click for a larger photo
The reverse commemorates the conquest of Egypt in 30 B.C. This theme was probably used at Nemausus because the colony was settled by Egyptian Greeks and veterans from Anthony's army that had surrendered to Octavian at Actium. This was the last of the COL NEM issues, distinguished by the addition of the title P P (Pater Patriae), an honor bestowed to Augustus in 2 B.C.
RP34063. Bronze dupondius, RIC I 159, RPC I 525, SNG Cop 699, SNG Tüb 161, SRCV 1731, VF, choice green patina, a few small punches on reverse, weight 12.637 g, maximum diameter 25.5 mm, die axis 30o, Colonia Augusta Nemausus (Nimes, France) mint, 10 - 14 A.D.; obverse IMP DIVI F P P, back to back heads of Agrippa and Augustus, Agrippa (on left) facing left wearing a rostral crown Augustus laureate head right; reverse COL NEM, crocodile right chained to palm tree, wreath above, two palms fronds below; SOLD


Nemausus, Gaul, c. 40 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Colonia Nemausus was founded as a colony by Tiberius Claudius Nero in 45 or 44 B.C. for veterans that had served Julius Caesar under his command in Gaul and the invasion of Egypt. He was the first husband of Livia and was persuaded or forced by Octavian to divorce her. At the wedding he gave her in marriage to Octavian "just as a father would."
GB90908. Silver obol, RPC I 519, SNG Cop 691, De la Tour 2718, VF, weight 0.294 g, maximum diameter 10.5 mm, die axis 0o, Nemausus (Nimes, France) mint, c. 40 B.C.; obverse helmeted and draped, male bust right, with long sideburns; reverse NEM COL in laurel wreath; SOLD


Celtic, Northeast Gaul, Remi, 1st Century B.C.

Click for a larger photo
The Remi were a Belgic people of north-eastern Gaul, with their capital at Durocortum (Reims, France). They were renowned for their horses and cavalry. The Remi allied themselves with Julius Caesar during the Gallic Wars and were one of the few tribes not to join the rebellion of Vercingetorix. Potin has no intrinsic value, so the caste potin coinage of the Gaulish Celts was fiat money (like the dollar bill, it has no value except that it is accepted in trade). There were no weight standards. Each type was accepted only by the tribe that issued it.
CE92008. Potin unit, CCCBM III 477, Castelin Zürich 328, De La Tour 8145, Delestrée-Tache 220, VF, gray patina, weight 4.999 g, maximum diameter 20.2 mm, die axis 270o, Durocortum (Reims, France) mint, 1st century B.C.; obverse figure seated facing, with legs crossed, holding torc in right hand, plait of hair in left hand; reverse boar standing right; snake-like ornament above, star above right, star below center; ex CNG e-auction 256 (25 May 2011), lot 163 (realized $220 plus fees); SOLD


Gallic Celts, Lingones, c. 58 - 50 B.C., Time of Caesar's Gallic Wars

Click for a larger photo
The Celtic Lingones tribe lived in Gaul near the headwaters of the Seine and Marne rivers. Their capital was called Andematunnum, then Lingones, now Langres in the Haute-Marne, France. Some Lingones migrated across the Alps and settled near the mouth of the Po River in Cisalpine Gaul of northern Italy around 400 B.C., part of a wave of Celtic tribes that included the Boii and Senones. The Lingones may have helped sack Rome in 390 B.C. The Gaulish Lingones were thoroughly Romanized by the 1st century, living in a rich and urbanized society in the region of Langres and Dijon and minting coins. They initially joined the Batavian rebellion, in 69 A.D., fearing they would be plundered by the Roman army. But when, contrary to expectation, the inhabitants remained unharmed and lost none of their property, they returned to loyalty, and provided Rome seventy thousand armed men. From dedicatory inscriptions and stamped tiles, we know that two cohorts of Lingones served in Roman Britain in the 2nd and 3rd centuries.Gaul
CE89062. Silver quinarius, CCBM II 416, Delestrée-Tache 3268, De la Tour 9025, Forrer 197, aEF, attractive iridescent toning, flow lines, tight flan, obverse off center, weight 1.887 g, maximum diameter 11.8 mm, die axis 30o, Lingones (Langres, France) mint, c. 58 - 50 B.C.; obverse SOLIMA (counterclockwise before), head left; reverse COΛIMA (clockwise above), bridled horse galloping left, fish (or dolphin) right with spiny fins below; ex CGB Numismatique Paris; ex Crédit de la Bourse SA (Paris, 1956 - 2003); ON LAYAWAY


Octavian Augustus, 16 January 27 B.C. - 19 August 14 A.D., Narbo, Gaul

Click for a larger photo
This issue was probably struck in 40 B.C., perhaps in the spring or Summer when Octavian was in Gaul.

In 40 B.C., with the Treaty of Brundisium, the Triumvirs agreed to divide the Roman Republic into spheres of influence. Gaius Octavian styled himself "Imperator Caesar" and controlled the Western provinces. Mark Antony controlled the Eastern provinces; the River Drin, the boundary between the provinces Illyricum and Macedonia, would serve as their frontier. Marcus Aemilius Lepidus controlled Hispania and Africa. The treaty was cemented by the marriage of Antony and Octavia, sister of Octavian.
RP39921. Leaded bronze as, RPC I 518 (same countermark in same location on pl. coin), F, weight 17.548 g, maximum diameter 29.6 mm, die axis 0o, Narbo (Narbonne, France) mint, c. 40 B.C.; obverse CAESAR, bare head right, countermark of cock; reverse prow with superstructure and mast right; SOLD


Augustus and Agrippa, c. 9 - 3 B.C., Colonia Augusta Nemausus, Gaul

Click for a larger photo
This two-headed brass dupondius was commonly cut between the heads, creating two individual one-as coins. The reverse commemorates the conquest of Egypt in 30 B.C. This theme was probably used at Nemausus because the colony was settled by Egyptian Greeks and veterans from Anthony's army that had surrendered to Octavian at Actium.
RP84427. Bronze cut half dupondius (as), cf. RIC I 158, RPC I 524, SNG Cop 699, SNG Tüb 152, SRCV I 1730, VF, choice for a cut half, earthen deposits, scratches, weight 8.903 g, maximum diameter 25.2 mm, die axis 180o, Colonia Augusta Nemausus (Nimes, France) mint, c. 9 - 3 B.C.; obverse IMP DIVI F, back to back heads of Augustus and Agrippa (cut, Agrippa off flan), Augustus laureate head right; reverse COL NEM, crocodile right chained to a palm, wreath above, two palm fronds below; SOLD


Augustus and Agrippa, 9 - 3 B.C., Colonia Augusta Nemausus, Gaul

Click for a larger photo
The reverse commemorates the conquest of Egypt in 30 B.C. This theme was probably used at Nemausus because the colony was settled by Egyptian Greeks and veterans from Anthony's army that had surrendered to Octavian at Actium. This was the last of the COL NEM issues, distinguished by the addition of the title P P (Pater Patriae), an honor bestowed to Augustus in 2 B.C.
RP91555. Bronze dupondius, RIC I 158, RPC I 524, SNG Cop 699, SNG Tüb 152, SRCV I 1730, F, well centered, scratches, some porosity, weight 12.194 g, maximum diameter 26.0 mm, die axis 0o, Colonia Augusta Nemausus (Nimes, France) mint, 9 - 3 B.C.; obverse IMP DIVI F, back to back heads of Augustus and Agrippa, Agrippa (on left) head left wearing a rostral crown and laurel wreath, Augustus head right wearing oak wreath, IMP above, DIVI F below; reverse Crocodile right chained to palm tree, wreath with long ties over COL - NEM above, two palms fronds below; from the Maxwell Hunt Collection; SOLD




  




You are viewing a SOLD items page.
Click here to return to the page with AVAILABLE items.
The sale |price| for a sold item is the private information of the buyer and will not be provided.



REFERENCES|

American Numismatic Society Collections Database (ANSCD) - http://numismatics.org/search/search.
Burnett, A., M. Amandry & P. Ripollès. Roman Provincial Coinage I: From the death of Caesar to the death of Vitellius (44 BC-AD 69). (London, 1992 and suppl.).
Lindgren, H. Ancient Greek Bronze Coins: European Mints from the Lindgren Collection. (San Mateo, 1989).
Lindgren, H. Ancient Greek Bronze Coins. (Quarryville, 1993).
Roman Provincial Coins (RPC) Online - http://rpc.ashmus.ox.ac.uk/coins/.
Sear, D. Greek Imperial Coins and Their Values. (London, 1982).
Sear, D. Roman Coins and Their Values, The Millennium Edition, Volume One, The Republic and The Twelve Caesars 280 BC - AD 86. (London, 2000).
Sutherland, C. The Roman Imperial Coinage, Vol. I, From 39 BC to AD 69. (London, 1984).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Denmark, The Royal Collection of Coins and Medals, Danish National Museum, Vol. 8: Egypt, North Africa, Spain - Gaul. (1994).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Deutschland, München Staatlische Münzsammlung, Part 1: Hispania. Gallia Narbonensis. (Berlin, 1968).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Deutschland, Münzsammlung Universität Tübingen, Part 1: Hispania-Sikelia. (Berlin, 1981).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain XII, The Hunterian Museum, University of Glasgow, Part 1: Roman Provincial Coins: Spain-Kingdoms of Asia Minor. (Oxford, 2004).

Catalog current as of Sunday, October 13, 2019.
Page created in 4.735 seconds.
Roman Gaul