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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Greek Coins| ▸ |Geographic - All Periods| ▸ |North Africa| ▸ |Carthage||View Options:  |  |  |   

Carthage

Carthage, located in North Africa on the Gulf of Tunis, established a hegemony over other Phoenician settlements throughout the Mediterranean, North Africa and what is now Spain. Carthage was in a constant state of struggle with the Roman Republic, which led to a series of conflicts known as the Punic Wars. The Third Punic War ended in the complete destruction of the city of Carthage, the annexation by Rome of all remaining Carthaginian territory, and the death or enslavement of the entire population of Carthage.Carthagian Empire Map

Carthage, Zeugitana, c. 310 - 290 B.C.

|Carthage|, |Carthage,| |Zeugitana,| |c.| |310| |-| |290| |B.C.|, |shekel|
SH30333. Electrum shekel, SNG Cop 137, SGCV II 6462, gVF, weight 7.439 g, maximum diameter 18.3 mm, die axis 0o, Carthage mint, obverse head of Tanit left, wreathed in grain, wearing necklace and triple-drop earring, dot border, pellet under chin; reverse horse standing right, three pellets in exergue; fine style; scarce; SOLD


Carthage, Zeugitana, North Africa, Second Punic War, c. 213 - 211 B.C.

|Carthage|, |Carthage,| |Zeugitana,| |North| |Africa,| |Second| |Punic| |War,| |c.| |213| |-| |211| |B.C.|, |half| |shekel|
Examples in the Enna hoard and other Sicilian hoards indicate that this coin was struck in Carthage for use in the Sicilian campaign of 213 - 210 BC. Experts disagree on the identity of the portrait; many identifying it as the god Melqart, others as Hannibal or his father.
SH13769. Silver half shekel, SNG Cop 383, Choice EF, weight 3.329 g, maximum diameter 18.6 mm, die axis 0o, Carthage mint, obverse laureate male head left (Hannibal or Melqart), dot border; reverse African elephant walking left on exergual line, Punic letter in exergue, linear border; toned; SOLD


Carthage, Zeugitana, North Africa, c. 350 - 320 B.C.

|Carthage|, |Carthage,| |Zeugitana,| |North| |Africa,| |c.| |350| |-| |320| |B.C.|, |stater|
Fantastic gold stater from the great enemy of Rome!
SH08971. Gold stater, Müller Afrique p. 84, type 47; SNG Cop Carthage 128 - 129 var., SNG Cop Sicily 973 - 974 var., SGCV II 6451 var, EF, weight 9.16 g, maximum diameter 19.0 mm, die axis 0o, Carthage or Sicilian mint, c. 350 - 320 B.C.; obverse head of Tanit left, wreathed in grain, wearing necklace and triple-drop earring, dot border; reverse horse standing right on exergual line, border of dots; graffiti on reverse, struck with dies of fine style, ex John Aiello; SOLD


Carthago Nova, Iberia, 237 - 209 B.C., Portrait of Hannibal(?)

|Iberia|, |Carthago| |Nova,| |Iberia,| |237| |-| |209| |B.C.,| |Portrait| |of| |Hannibal(?)|, |shekel|
The obverse portrait is identified by most numismatists as an uncertain male, either Hannibal or the god Melqart. The portrait could be Melqart with the features of Hannibal.
SH54905. Silver shekel, SNG BM 104 ff., Burgos 535, SGCV II 6568, gVF, flat centers, weight 6.648 g, maximum diameter 20.7 mm, die axis 0o, Carthago Nova mint, obverse beardless male head (Hannibal?) left; reverse horse standing right, palm tree behind; ex Tom Cederlind; SOLD


Sicily, Siculo-Punic, 4th Century B.C.

|Punic| |Sicily|, |Sicily,| |Siculo-Punic,| |4th| |Century| |B.C.|, |tetradrachm|
"The types too are generally considered to be Carthaginian, especially that of the horse's head by itself, which is taken as a reference to the myth recounted by Vergil, that the companions of Dido on her expedition to found Carthage 'dug up a horse's head at the spot indicated by Juno.' Moreover, according to Stephanus, Carthage was also called KAKKABH, a word that in Punic means 'the head of a horse'." -- Eckhel, Doctrina I (1792), pp. 229-230. Eckhel himself has some hesitation about accepting this explanation of the type, however, because of the appearance of a similar horse's head type on early Roman didrachms with the inscription ROMA.
SH08966. Silver tetradrachm, Müller Afrique p. 76, type 23; SNG Cop (Zeugitania) 86; SNG Cop (Sicily) 982, EF, extraordinary high relief, superb style, some mint luster, weight 16.84 g, maximum diameter 26.1 mm, die axis 180o, Sicilian mint, c. 320/315 - 300 B.C.; obverse head of Kore-Tanit left, wreathed in barley, wearing triple-pendant earring, and necklace, four dolphins around swimming clockwise; reverse horse's head left, date palm behind, Punic letter M below; SOLD


Carthaginians in Sicily, 325 - 300 B.C.

|Punic| |Sicily|, |Carthaginians| |in| |Sicily,| |325| |-| |300| |B.C.|, |tetradrachm|
In 311 B.C., Agathocles, the tyrant of Syracuse, invaded the Carthaginian holdings on Sicily and laid siege to Akragas. Hamilcar led the Carthaginian response, and by 310 controlled almost all of Sicily and laid siege to Syracuse itself. In desperation, Agathocles secretly led an expedition of 14,000 men to Africa, hoping to save his rule by leading a counterstrike against Carthage itself. Carthage was forced to recall Hamilcar and most of his army from Sicily. Agathocles was eventually defeated in 307 B.C., but he escaped back to Sicily and negotiated a peace which maintained Syracuse as a stronghold of Greek power in Sicily.
SH12231. Silver tetradrachm, SGCV II 6436, SNG Cop 983, EF, weight 17.096 g, maximum diameter 24.4 mm, die axis 0o, obverse head of young Herakles clad in lion's skin; reverse horse's head, l.; palm tree behind, Punic legend AMHMHNTE (people of the camp) below; beautiful coin; SOLD


Carthago Nova, Iberia, c. 237 - 209 B.C., Portrait of Hannibal(?)

|Iberia|, |Carthago| |Nova,| |Iberia,| |c.| |237| |-| |209| |B.C.,| |Portrait| |of| |Hannibal(?)|, |1/4| |Shekel|
The obverse portrait is identified by most numismatists as an uncertain male, either Hannibal or the god Melqart. The portrait could be Melqart with the features of Hannibal.
SH54903. Silver 1/4 Shekel, SNG BM 117 ff., Villaronga CNH 66, SGCV II 6572, VF, weight 1.640 g, maximum diameter 12.8 mm, die axis 0o, Carthago Nova mint, obverse beardless male head (Hannibal?) left; reverse horse standing right, palm tree behind; some light scratches on reverse, some surface granularity, as is common for this issue, lightly toned, portrait in pleasing style; rare; SOLD


Carthage, Zeugitana, North Africa, 229 - 221 B.C.

|Carthage|, |Carthage,| |Zeugitana,| |North| |Africa,| |229| |-| |221| |B.C.|, |shekel|
The Second Punic War, 218 - 201 B.C., is most remembered for Hannibal's crossing of the Alps, followed by his crushing victories over Rome in the battle of the Trebia, at Trasimene, and again at Cannae. After these defeats, many Roman allies joined Carthage, prolonging the war in Italy for over a decade. Against Hannibal's skill on the battlefield, the Romans deployed the Fabian strategy. More capable in siegecraft, the Romans recaptured all the major cities that had defected. The Romans defeated an attempt to reinforce Hannibal at the battle of the Metaurus and, in Iberia, Publius Cornelius Scipio Africanus Major took New Carthage and ended Carthaginian rule over Iberia in the Battle of Ilipa. The final showdown was the Battle of Zama in Africa where Scipio Africanus defeated Hannibal, resulting in the imposition of harsh peace conditions on Carthage, which ceased to be a major power and became a Roman client-state.Hannibal's route of invasion
GS92184. Silver shekel, Viola CNP 134, Müller Afrique 126, SNG Cop VIII 291, Macdonald Hunter 67, Villaronga NAH 201, Villaronga CNH 25, VF, toned, bumps and scratches, reverse a little off center, scattered porosity, small edge split, overstruck(?), weight 7.278 g, maximum diameter 23.9 mm, die axis 215o, Carthage mint, 229 - 221 B.C.; obverse head of Tanit-Kore left, hair wreathed with grain; reverse horse prancing right on short exergue line, star above with eight rays around central pellet; ex Ancient Imports (Marc Breitsprecher); scarce; SOLD


Carthaginians in Sicily, 300 - 289 B.C.

|Carthage|, |Carthaginians| |in| |Sicily,| |300| |-| |289| |B.C.|, |tetradrachm|
At the height of its prominence, Carthage's influence extended over most of the western Mediterranean. Rivalry with Rome led to a series of conflicts, the Punic Wars. The Third Punic War ended in the complete destruction of the city, annexation by Rome of all Carthaginian territory, and the death or enslavement of the entire Carthaginian population.
SL84036. Silver tetradrachm, Jenkins Punic 394 (O120/R322); SNG Cop VIII 91; Dewing 983; SGCV II 6438; HGC 2 295, NGC Choice VF, strike 4/5, surface 5/5 (3819620-001), weight 17.03 g, maximum diameter 23 mm, die axis 225o, Sicilian mint, 300 - 289 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, clad in lion's scalp; reverse horse's head left, palm tree behind, Punic inscription MHSBM (paymasters) below; NGC certified (slabbed); SOLD


Carthage, Hannibal in Italy, Second Punic War, c. 219 - 202 B.C.

|Carthage|, |Carthage,| |Hannibal| |in| |Italy,| |Second| |Punic| |War,| |c.| |219| |-| |202| |B.C.|, |half| |shekel|
Ancient Capua was located where Santa Maria Capua Vetere is now. After 343 B.C., when Capua and neighboring communities entered into alliance with Rome for protection against the Samnite mountain tribes, the greater part of Campania came under Roman supremacy. Capua prospered and at the beginning of the Second Punic War it was almost as important as Rome and Carthage themselves, and was able to furnish 30,000 infantry and 4,000 cavalry. Until the defeat of Cannae it remained faithful to Rome, but then, after a vain demand that one of the consuls should always be selected from it, it defected to Hannibal. Hannibal and his army were voluntarily received by Capua and he made it his winter quarters. In 211, Rome besieged and captured Capua. The city's nobility were put to the sword, its territory was confiscated and its municipal organization was dissolved.
SH30343. Silver half shekel, SNG Cop 362, aEF, toned, weight 3.618 g, maximum diameter 18.3 mm, die axis 90o, Italian (Capua?) mint, c. 216 - 211 B.C.; obverse head of Tanit left; reverse horse right, sun above, O below; SOLD




  




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REFERENCES|

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