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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Themes & Provenance ▸ Personifications ▸ FertilityView Options:  |  |  |   

Women's Fertility (Hera, Fecunditas, and other Fertility Goddesses)

Many ancient gods and godesses were associated with women's fertility. For the Greeks, Hera was associated with women's fertility and childbirth, but Artemis was responsible for women's health and thus also fertility. The Egyptian frog-goddess Heget was a fertility goddess, but Isis and many others Egyptian gods and goddesses had fertility roles. Fecunditas, the Roman goddess of fertility, is often depicted on coins of the empresses. See Wikipedia for a list of fertility deities - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_fertility_deities


Komama, Pisidia, 1st Century B.C.

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A recent CNG auction identified their example of this type as only the second known silver coin of Komama. This hemidrachm type is the only known silver silver struck by Komama, all examples of which were struck from a single pair of dies, and of which only a single von Aulock specimen is published.
SH32489. Silver hemidrachm, Von Aulock Komama 1 (all known examples, including this coin, from the same dies); otherwise unpublished, VF, weight 2.148 g, maximum diameter 13.6 mm, die axis 0o, Komama mint, 1st century B.C.; obverse diademed head of Artemis right, K behind; reverse KOMA−MEΩN, long torch; flat areas, small bumps on the obverse were caused by an ancient fire; extremely rare; SOLD


Mytilene, Lesbos, c. 377 - 326 B.C.

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Mytilene was famous in ancient times for its great output of electrum coins struck from the late 6th through mid - 4th centuries B.C. The usual denomination was the hekte (1/6th stater). Warwick Wroth noted in the British Museum Catalog, "The Sixths of [this Lesbos electrum series] form one of the most beautiful coin-series of the ancient world. This will be evident from a glance."
SH21935. Electrum hekte, Bodenstedt 100, gVF, weight 2.550 g, maximum diameter 10.5 mm, die axis 0o, Mytilene mint, c. 332 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo right; reverse head of Artemis right, hair in sphendone, snake lower left, all within linear frame and incuse square; SOLD


Faustina Junior, Augusta 146 - Winter 175/176 A.D., Wife of Marcus Aurelius

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Although many coin references classify Fecunditas as a personification of fertility rather than as an actual deity, Fecunditas was recognized as a Roman divinity by Nero, who erected a statue to her. Tacitus notes that upon the birth of Claudia Neronis, the senate decreed the construction of a temple of Fertility to be built at Antium. Fecunditas is always portrayed as a female figure holding a child, or children and often a scepter, cornucopia, palm branch or caduceus. Sometimes the children are depicted standing at her feet. Coins portraying her usually advertise the fertility of the imperial family.
SH77006. Silver denarius, RIC III MA676, RSC II 95, BMCRE IV MA89, MIR 18 10, SRCV II 5251, Choice EF, toned, superb strike with sharp dies, slightly ragged edge, among the finest known examples of the type, weight 3.331 g, maximum diameter 18.8 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, struck under Marcus Aurelius, 161 - 175 A.D.; obverse FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right; reverse FECVND AVGVSTAE, Fecunditas standing facing, head left, cradling an infant in each arm, flanked by two children standing at feet; from the Jyrki Muona Collection, ex Harlan J. Berk; SOLD


Macedonia Prima Merida (First Region), Roman Dependent Republic, c. 168 - 149 B.C.

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In 168 B.C., Rome split Macedonia into four pseudo-autonomous republics. These republics nominally managed their own internal affairs but were denied the right to make external agreements of any kind. The Prima Merida (1st region) included the area between the Strymonas and Nestos rivers, up to the eastern lands of Nestos, without the towns of Aenos, Maroneia and Avdera. The capital was Amphipolis.
SH33195. Silver tetradrachm, SNG Ashmolean 3297 - 3298; SNG Saroglos 976; BMC Macedonia p. 8, 7; AMNG III 176; SNG Cop -, aEF, weight 16.885 g, maximum diameter 32.9 mm, die axis 0o, Amphipolis mint, 158 - 149 B.C.; obverse Macedonian shield (the whole obverse represents a shield) with bust of Artemis Tauropolos (Diana to the Romans) at the center facing right, bow and quiver at her shoulder; reverse MAKE∆ONΩN / ΠPΩTHΣ (First Macedonia) above and below club, ΣHY∆P monogram above, TKP monogram below left, TYPME monogram bottom right, all within oak wreath, thunderbolt left; SOLD


Mytilene, Lesbos, c. 377 - 326 B.C.

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Mytilene was famous in ancient times for its great output of electrum coins struck from the late 6th through mid - 4th centuries B.C. The usual denomination was the hekte (1/6th stater). Warwick Wroth noted in the British Museum Catalog, "The Sixths of [this Lesbos electrum series] form one of the most beautiful coin-series of the ancient world. This will be evident from a glance."
SH81271. Electrum hekte, Bodenstedt 95, SNGvA 1717, gVF, weight 2.542 g, maximum diameter 10.5 mm, die axis 0o, Mytilene mint, c. 377 - 326 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo right; reverse head of Artemis right, hair in sphendone, within linear square; SOLD


Komama, Pisidia, 1st Century B.C.

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A recent CNG auction identified their example of this type as only the second known silver coin of Komama. This hemidrachm type is the only known silver silver struck by Komama, all examples of which were struck from a single pair of dies, and of which only a single von Aulock specimen is published.
SH31655. Silver hemidrachm, Von Aulock Komama 1 (all known examples, including this coin, from the same dies); otherwise unpublished, aEF, weight 1.517 g, maximum diameter 13.7 mm, die axis 0o, Komama mint, 1st century B.C.; obverse diademed head of Artemis right, K behind; reverse KOMA−MEΩN, long torch; reverse struck with partially filled die, bumpy fields on the reverse were caused by an ancient fire; extremely rare; SOLD


Corinth, Corinthia, Greece, 345 - 307 B.C.

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Horace is quoted as saying: "non licet omnibus adire Corinthum," which translates, "Not everyone is able to go to Corinth" (referring to the expensive living standards that prevailed in the city). Corinth was renowned for the temple prostitutes of Aphrodite, the goddess of love, who served the wealthy merchants and the powerful officials living in or traveling in and out of the city. The most famous of them, Lais, was said to have extraordinary abilities and charged tremendous fees for her favors.
SH46853. Silver stater, Pegasi I 457, BCD Korinth 133, Ravel 1081, HGC 4 1848, BMC Corinth -, VF, weight 8.368 g, maximum diameter 21.6 mm, die axis 315o, Corinth mint, obverse Pegasos flying left, koppa below; reverse helmeted head of Athena (or Aphrodite) left, ∆ below chin, I and Artemis running right with torch behind; SOLD


Phokaia, Ionia, c. 380 - 370 B.C.

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Certificate of Authenticity issued by David R. Sear.

Bodenstedt, in his detailed study of the Phokaian and Lesbian elctrum, dates this type to the first decade of the 4th century B.C. Phokaia was the most northerly of the Ionian communities in Asia Minor and was the mother city of many colonies in the western Mediterranean area, including Massalia (modern Marseille, France).
SH12331. Electrum hekte, Bodenstedt 99 (c/β); BMC Ionia p. 210, 50; cf. SGCV II 4530-33, good VF, weight 2.545 g, maximum diameter 9.9 mm, Phokaia (Foca, Turkey) mint, 380 - 370 B.C.; obverse head of Artemis left, her hair confined by three bands, side tresses gathered upand tied in back, tip of quiver at shoulder, seal left below; reverse quadripartite incuse square; SOLD


Selinous, Sicily, 440 - 420 B.C.

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SH02927. Silver tetradrachm, Schwabacher 20, SNG Lloyd 1233, SNG ANS 693 (all same reverse die), F, weight 16.47 g, maximum diameter 26.8 mm, die axis 180o, Selinus mint, 440 - 420 B.C.; obverse slow quadriga driven by Artemis, Apollo drawing a bow beside her, grain in exergue; reverse ΣEΛINONTION, river-god Selinos, standing left, draped at waist and over left arm, sacrificing from phiale over lit altar, sacrificial cock on altar, holding branch in left hand, right: bull standing on pedestal with incuse A, Selinon leaf above; obverse struck with damaged die, reverse legend not struck; rare; SOLD


Komama, Pisidia, 1st Century B.C.

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A recent CNG auction identified their example of this type as only the second known silver coin of Komama. This hemidrachm type is the only known silver silver struck by Komama, all examples of which were struck from a single pair of dies, and of which only a single von Aulock specimen is published.
SH31652. Silver hemidrachm, Von Aulock Komama 1 (all known examples, including this coin, from the same dies); otherwise unpublished, VF, weight 1.786 g, maximum diameter 13.6 mm, die axis 0o, Komama mint, 1st century B.C.; obverse diademed head of Artemis right, K behind; reverse KOMA-MEWN, long torch; slightly rough surfaces caused by an ancient fire; extremely rare; SOLD




  




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Catalog current as of Wednesday, June 26, 2019.
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Fertility