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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Themes & Provenance ▸ Personifications ▸ HealthView Options:  |  |  |   

Health (Hygieia or Salus)

Hygieia (also Hygiea or Hygeia, in Latin Hygea or Hygia), was the daughter of Aesculapius, the god of medicine and healing, and Epione, the goddess of soothing of pain. She was the goddess of health, cleanliness and sanitation. While her father was more directly associated with healing, she was associated with the prevention of sickness and the continuation of good health. Her name is the source of the word "hygiene." She was imported by the Romans as the Goddess Valetudo, the goddess of personal health, but over time she was increasingly identified with the ancient Italian goddess of social welfare, Salus.


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D.

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Certificate of Authenticity issued by David R. Sear.

On the Certificate, David Sear notes, "a very rare obverse variant and an excellent example of the early "Trajanic" style of Hadrian's portraiture."
SH24853. Gold aureus, BMCRE III p. 250, 84 note; RIC II 46 var. (bust right), Cohen 1368 var. (same), Choice VF, weight 7.124 g, maximum diameter 19.4 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 118 A.D.; obverse IMP CAESAR TRAIAN HADRIANVS AVG, laureate and cuirassed bust left; reverse P M TR P COS II, Salus seated left, feeding snake coiled around altar, SALVS AVG (the health of the Emperor) in exergue; ex Freeman and Sear; very rare; SOLD


Nero, 13 October 54 - 9 June 68 A.D.

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To celebrate his escape from the Pisonian conspiracy and assassination attempt in 65 A.D., Nero constructed a temple to Salus, the Roman goddess of health and safety, and honored her on the reverse of his coins.
SH38942. Gold aureus, RIC I 59, Cohen I 313, BnF II 225, SRCV I 1932, gF, weight 7.092 g, maximum diameter 19.0 mm, die axis 135o, Rome mint, 65 - 66 A.D.; obverse NERO CAESAR AVGVSTVS, laureate head right; reverse Salus seated left on high back throne, patera in right, SALVS (health) in exergue; SOLD


France, Louis XVI, 10 May 1774 - 4 September 1791 A.D.

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Louis XVI, born Louis-Auguste, was the last King of France and Navarre before the French Revolution; during which he was also known as Louis Capet. In 1765, at the death of his father, Louis, Dauphin of France, son and heir apparent of Louis XV of France, Louis-Auguste became the new Dauphin. Upon his grandfather's death on 10 May 1774, he became King of France and Navarre, which he remained until 4 September 1791, when he received the title of King of the French until his suspension on 10 August 1792. Louis XVI was guillotined on 21 January 1793.

The Louis d'or (20 francs) under Louis XVI was minted between 1785 and 1792 and had a dimension of 23 mm, and a weight of 7.6490 g, a fineness of 0.917, and gold content of 0.2255 troy oz.
SH84615. Gold louis d'or, Duplessy 1707, Ciani 2183, Gadoury 361, Krause KM 591.5, Friedberg 475, Choice EF, mint luster, light marks, weight 7.663 g, maximum diameter 24.3 mm, die axis 180o, Lyon mint, 1786, 1st issue; obverse LUD. XVI. D. G. FR. - ET NAV. REX (LVDOVICVS XIII DEI GRATIA FRANCIAE ET NAVARRAE REX "Louis XIII by the grace of God king of France and of Navarre"), head of Louis XVI left, DUVIV (engraver B. Duvivier) on truncation, bee (sign of the mintmaster Jean-Claude Gabet) below; reverse CHRS. REGN. VINC. IMPER 1786 (CHRISTVS REGNAT VINCIT IMPERAT "Christ reigns, conquers and commands"), crowned arms of France and Navarre, D (Lyon mintmark) below, eagle head left (symbol of engraver Jean Humbert Bernavon) before date; SOLD


Theodosius II and Valentinian III, 23 October 424 - 28 July 450 A.D.

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This type was issued to commemorate the second joint consulship of Theodosius II (his eleventh) and Valentinian III (his second). A similar issue the year before commemorating their first joint consulship had Valentinian III standing, but now he is an Augustus, a co-emperor, enthroned beside Theodosius.
SH15310. Gold solidus, RIC X Theodosius II 237 (S, same reverse legend break); DOCLR 375; Depeyrot p. 253, 79/1; Hahn MIRB 23; SRCV V 21144, Choice EF, weight 4.460 g, maximum diameter 21.2 mm, die axis 180o, 5th officina, Constantinople (Istanbul, Turkey) mint, c. 426 A.D.; obverse D N THEODOSIVS P F AVG, diademed, helmeted, and cuirassed bust facing, head slightly right, spear in right hand over right shoulder and behind head, shield in his right hand ornamented with a horseman spearing a fallen enemy; reverse SALVS REI-PVBLICAE E (health of the Republic, 5th officina), Theodosius II (on left) and Valentinian III enthroned facing, each nimbate and wearing consular robes, each holds a cruciform scepter in their right hand and mappa in their left hand, star above, CONOB in exergue; scarce; SOLD


Pescennius Niger, April to 1 June 193 - March, April or May 194 A.D.

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Salus was the Roman goddess of health. She was Hygieia to the Greeks, who believed her to be the daughter of Aesculapius, the god of medicine and healing, and Epione, the goddess of soothing of pain. Her father Asclepius learned the secrets of keeping death at bay after observing one snake bringing another snake healing herbs. Woman seeking fertility, the sick, and the injured slept in his temples in chambers where non-poisonous snakes were left to crawl on the floor and provide healing.
SH33752. Silver denarius, RIC IV 77, Cohen III 68, VF, porous, weight 2.444 g, maximum diameter 18.0 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, obverse IMP CAES C PESC NIGER IVSTI AVG, laureate head right; reverse SALVTI AVGVSTI, Salus standing right, feeding snake held in right from patera in left, altar at feet; well centered; rare; SOLD


Nero, 13 October 54 - 9 June 68 A.D.

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To celebrate his escape from the Pisonian conspiracy and assassination attempt in 65 A.D., Nero constructed a temple to Salus, the Roman goddess of health and safety, and honored her on the reverse of his coins.
SH40513. Silver denarius, RIC I 67, RSC II 318, BMCRE I 90, BnF II 237, Hunter I 30, SRCV I 1945, VF, attractive style, excellent portrait, weight 3.508 g, maximum diameter 18.4 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 66 - 67 A.D.; obverse NERO CAESAR AVGVSTVS, laureate head right; reverse Salus enthroned left, patera in extended right, left elbow on throne, SALVS (health) in exergue; SOLD


Galba, 3 April 68 - 15 January 69 A.D.

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Salus was the Roman goddess of health. She was Hygieia to the Greeks, who believed her to be the daughter of Aesculapius, the god of medicine and healing, and Epione, the goddess of soothing of pain. Her father Asclepius learned the secrets of keeping death at bay after observing one snake bringing another snake healing herbs. Woman seeking fertility, the sick, and the injured slept in his temples in chambers where non-poisonous snakes were left to crawl on the floor and provide healing.
SH19909. Copper as, RIC I 501, Cohen I 230, BMCRE I 265 note, VF, high relief, well centered obverse, light smoothing in fields, weight 10.521 g, maximum diameter 28.4 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, Dec 68 - 15 Jan 69 A.D.; obverse SER SVLPI GALBA IMP CAESAR AVG P M TR P, bare-headed draped bust right; reverse SALVS AVGVSTI (to the health of the Emperor), Salus leaning left on column, legs crossed, feeding snake from patera, S - C (senatus consulto) flanking across field; rare; SOLD


Nerva, 18 September 96 - 25 January 98 A.D.

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Salus was the Roman goddess of health. She was Hygieia to the Greeks, who believed her to be the daughter of Aesculapius, the god of medicine and healing, and Epione, the goddess of soothing of pain. Her father Asclepius learned the secrets of keeping death at bay after observing one snake bringing another snake healing herbs. Woman seeking fertility, the sick, and the injured slept in his temples in chambers where non-poisonous snakes were left to crawl on the floor and provide healing.
SH01665. Silver denarius, RIC II 20, RSC II 134, BMCRE III 48, EF, weight 3.26 g, maximum diameter 18.4 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 1 Jan - 18 Sep 97 A.D.; obverse IMP NERVA CAES AVG P M TR P COS III P P, laureate head right; reverse SALVS PVBLICA (health of the public), Salus seated left, heads of grain in right, left elbow on throne; scarce; SOLD


Nero, 13 October 54 - 9 June 68 A.D.

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To celebrate his escape from the Pisonian conspiracy and assassination attempt in 65 A.D., Nero constructed a temple to Salus, the Roman goddess of health and safety, and honored her on the reverse of his coins.
RS41959. Silver denarius, RIC I 71 (R), BMCRE I 98, RSC II 316, Mac Dowall WCN 66, BnF II 242, cf. SRCV I 1945 (obv leg, 66 - 67), VF/F, weight 3.330 g, maximum diameter 18.8 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 67 - 68 A.D.; obverse IMP NERO CAESAR AVG P P, laureate head right; reverse Salus enthroned left, patera in right, left hand at side, SALVS (health) in exergue; SOLD


Trajan, 25 January 98 - 8 or 9 August 117 A.D.

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Salus was the Roman goddess of health. She was Hygieia to the Greeks, who believed her to be the daughter of Aesculapius, the god of medicine and healing, and Epione, the goddess of soothing of pain. Her father Asclepius learned the secrets of keeping death at bay after observing one snake bringing another snake healing herbs. Woman seeking fertility, the sick, and the injured slept in his temples in chambers where non-poisonous snakes were left to crawl on the floor and provide healing.
SH53263. Orichalcum sestertius, SRCV II 3199, RIC II 515, VF, weight 27.084 g, maximum diameter 32.6 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 107 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES NERVAE TRAIANO AVG GER DAC P M TR P COS V P P, laureate bust right, slight drapery on left shoulder; reverse S P Q R OPTIMO PRINCIPI S C, Salus seated left, feeding snake arising from altar; attractive coin, some obverse roughness; SOLD




  




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