Coins and Antiquities Consignment Shop
  Welcome Guest. Please login or register. All items are guaranteed authentic for eternity! Please call us if you have questions 252-646-1958. Thanks for your business! Welcome Guest. Please login or register. All items are guaranteed authentic for eternity! All blue text is linked. Click for a definition or other information. Thanks for your business!

Catalog Main Menu
Fine Coins Showcase

Antiquities Showcase
Recent Additions
Recent Price Reductions

Show empty categories
Shop Search
Shopping Cart
Contact Us
About Forum
Shopping at Forum
Our Guarantee
Payment Options
Shipping Options & Fees
Privacy & Security
Forum Staff
Selling Your Coins
Identifying Your Coin
FAQs
Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Themes & Provenance ▸ Nautical & Marine ▸ ShipsView Options:  |  |  |   

Galleys and Other Ships on Ancient Coins

Roman Republic, L.P.D.A.P. Series, c. 91 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
The Lex Papiria de assis pondere et sestertio feriundo (Papirian Law concerning the weight of the as and the striking of the sestertius) of 91 (or maybe 90) B.C. re-authorized the production of silver sestertii, which hadn't been seen for over a century. More importantly, it reduced the standard weight of the as to a half ounce (the semuncial standard).This law is attested by Pliny, who says that "mox lege Papiria semunciarii asses facti" (soon by the Papirian Law asses were made semuncial). What is most interesting is that this law is attested on the first coins struck under its terms. Sestertii bear the letters E.L.P. for "e lege Papiria" (by the Papirian Law) and bronzes have the formula L.P.D.A.P. for "lege Papiria de assis pondere.
RR72069. Bronze as, Crawford 338/1, Sydenham 678, BMCRR I Rome 2188, RBW Collection 1236, SRCV I 739, F, centered, rough, weight 13.996 g, maximum diameter 29.3 mm, die axis 225o, Rome mint, c. 91 B.C.; obverse laureate and bearded head of Janus, I (mark of value) above; reverse prow right, L.P.D.A.P. (Lex Papiria de assis pondere) above, I (mark of value) above, ROMA in exergue; from a Floridian Collector, ex Andrew McCabe Collection, ex RBW Collection (2009); scarce; $80.00 (69.60)


Berytus, Phoenicia, 114 - 117 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
While playing the flute Athena saw her reflection in water, and disturbed by how her cheeks looked, puffed up while playing, threw away the instrument in disgust. The satyr Marsyas picked up the flute and since it had once been inspired by the breath of a goddess, it played beautifully on its own accord. Elated by his success, Marsyas challenged Apollo to a musical contest. For the prize, the victor could do what he pleased with the vanquished. The Muses were the umpires. Apollo played the cithara and Marsyas the flute. Only after Apollo added his voice to the music of his lyre was the contest decided in his favor. As a just punishment for the presumption of Marsyas, Apollo bound him to a tree and flayed him alive. His blood was the source of the river Marsyas, and Apollo hung up his skin, like a wine bag, in the cave out of which that river flows.
GB73087. Bronze AE 12, Sawaya 786 ff.; SNG Cop 89; BMC Phoenicia p. 56, 1 ff.; RPC I -, VF, weight 1.892 g, maximum diameter 12.3 mm, die axis 180o, Berytus (Beirut, Lebanon) mint, 114 - 117 A.D.; obverse Marsyas advancing left, carrying wine skin over shoulder, CO-L divided across field; reverse forepart of galley right, BER above; $80.00 (69.60)


Salonina, Augusta 254 - c. September 268 A.D., Kyzikos, Mysia

Click for a larger photo
In 74 B.C. Cyzicus, allied with Rome, withstood a siege by King Mithridates VI of Pontus. Rome rewarded this loyalty with territory and with municipal independence which lasted until the reign of Tiberius. When it was incorporated into the Empire, it was made the capital of Mysia, afterward of Hellespontus. Cyzicus was one of the great cities of the ancient world.
RP53294. Bronze AE 23, SNG Cop 143, BMC Mysia 287, F, weight 5.654 g, maximum diameter 24.1 mm, die axis 45o, Cyzicus (Kapu Dagh, Turkey) mint, obverse CAΛΩNEINA CE, draped bust right, wearing stephane, set on crescent; reverse KYZIKHN KEOKOPΩ, quinquereme with four oarsmen right, Triton blowing horn right; $75.00 (65.25)


Roman Republic, Anonymous Luceria, 211 - 206 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
In 321 B.C., the Roman army was deceived into thinking Luceria was under siege by the Samnites. Hurrying to relieve their allies the army walked into an ambush and were defeated at the famous Battle of the Caudine Forks. The Samnites occupied Luceria but were thrown out after a revolt. The city sought Roman protection and in 320 B.C. was granted the status of Colonia Togata, which meant it was ruled by the Roman Senate. In order to strengthen the ties between the two cities, 2,500 Romans moved to Luceria. From then on, Luceria was known as a steadfast supporter of Rome.
RR68176. Bronze uncia, Crawford 97/7c, Sydenham 304, BMCRR Italy 173, 169, SRCV I 1320,, F, some corrosion, weight 5.081 g, maximum diameter 19.7 mm, die axis 90o, Luceria mint, 211 - 206 B.C.; obverse helmeted head of Roma right, pellet (mark of value) behind; reverse ROMA, galley prow right, ROMA above, L and pellet (mark of value) below; $75.00 (65.25)


Roman Republic, L. Sempronius Pitio, 148 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
In Roman mythology, Janus (or Ianus) was the god of gates, doors, doorways, and of beginnings and endings. Janus is believed to be one of the few major deities in Roman mythology that does not have a Greek origin or counterpart.
RR69279. Copper as, SRCV I 726, Sydenham 403, Crawford 216/2, BMCRR Rome 718, F, porous, large flan flaw (pit) on reverse, weight 26.659 g, maximum diameter 31.3 mm, die axis 270o, Rome mint, 148 B.C.; obverse laureate head of bearded Janus, ΠI−TIO divided by I (mark of value) above; reverse galley prow right, L SEMP (MP ligate) above, I (mark of value) right, ROMA below; from the Andrew McCabe Collection; $75.00 (65.25)


Roman Republic, C. Junius C.f., 149 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
In Roman mythology, Janus (or Ianus) was the god of gates, doors, doorways, and of beginnings and endings. Janus is believed to be one of the few major deities in Roman mythology that does not have a Greek origin or counterpart.
RR69287. Bronze as, Crawford 210/2, Sydenham 393, BMCRR Rome 664, SRCV I 723, F, weight 18.492 g, maximum diameter 29.8 mm, die axis 225o, Rome mint, 149 B.C.; obverse laureate head of bearded Janus, I (mark of value) above; reverse galley prow right, CIVNI above, I (mark of value) right, ROMA below; from the Andrew McCabe Collection; $75.00 (65.25)


Roman Republic, Anonymous (Roma Monogram), 212 - 205 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
The southern mints were closed after 204 B.C., once Hannibal quit Italy.
RR69326. Bronze quadrans, BMCRR Italy 195 (same dies), Crawford 84/6, Sydenham 190B, SRCV I -, aVF, weight 11.703 g, maximum diameter 23.2 mm, die axis 90o, southeast Italy mint, 212 - 205 B.C.; obverse head of Hercules right, clad in Nemean Lion's scalp, three pellets (mark of value) behind; reverse galley prow right, ROMA above, ROMA monogram before prow, three pellets (mark of value) below; from the Andrew McCabe Collection; rare; $75.00 (65.25)


Roman Republic, OPEI (Q. Opeimius?), 169 - 157 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
In Roman mythology, Janus (or Ianus) was the god of gates, doors, doorways, and of beginnings and endings. Janus is believed to be one of the few major deities in Roman mythology that does not have a Greek origin or counterpart.
RR69345. Copper as, Sydenham 363, Crawford 190/1, BMCRR Rome 598, SRCV I 701, aVF, nice green patina, weight 23.810 g, maximum diameter 33.5 mm, die axis 315o, Rome mint, 169 - 157 B.C.; obverse laureate head of bearded Janus, I (mark of value) above; reverse galley prow right, OPEI above, I (mark of value) right, ROMA below; from the Andrew McCabe Collection; $75.00 (65.25)


Roman Republic, M. Caecilius Q.f. Metellus, 127 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
This type was issued both with and without the moneyer's name inscribed on the side of the prow. It isn't clear if the moneyer's name was ever present on this coin.
RR69361. Bronze semis, Crawford 263/3a (moneyer's name on prow) or 263/3b (no name), Sydenham 482, BMCRE Rome 1151 (with name), SRCV I 881, F, weight 5.660 g, maximum diameter 22.0 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 127 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Saturn right, S (mark of value) behind; reverse prow right, Macedonian shield above, S (mark of value) right, ROMA below, [METELLVS on prow] (or similar, or omitted); from the Andrew McCabe Collection; $75.00 (65.25)


Roman Republic, L. Cornelius Cinna, 169 - 157 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
On 22 June 168 B.C., at the Battle of Pydna (in southern Macedonia) Roman forces under Lucius Aemilius Paulus decisively defeated Perseus and his Macedonian forces, ending the Third Macedonian War. Perseus was captured spent the rest of his life in captivity at Alba Fucens, near Rome. The Macedonian Kingdom was broken up into four smaller states. All the Greek cities which offered aid to Macedonia, even just in words, were punished. Rome took hundreds of prisoners from the leading families of Macedonia, including the historian Polybius.
RR72169. Bronze as, Crawford 178/1, Sydenham 368, BMCRR I Rome 804, SRCV I 699, aF, weight 32.645 g, maximum diameter 31.4 mm, die axis 90o, Rome mint, 169 - 157 B.C.; obverse laureate bearded head of Janus, I (mark of value) above; reverse galley prow right, CINA above, I (mark of value) right, ROMA below; $75.00 (65.25)


Berytus, Phoenicia, 114 - 117 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
While playing the flute Athena saw her reflection in water, and disturbed by how her cheeks looked, puffed up while playing, threw away the instrument in disgust. The satyr Marsyas picked up the flute and since it had once been inspired by the breath of a goddess, it played beautifully on its own accord. Elated by his success, Marsyas challenged Apollo to a musical contest. For the prize, the victor could do what he pleased with the vanquished. The Muses were the umpires. Apollo played the cithara and Marsyas the flute. Only after Apollo added his voice to the music of his lyre was the contest decided in his favor. As a just punishment for the presumption of Marsyas, Apollo bound him to a tree and flayed him alive. His blood was the source of the river Marsyas, and Apollo hung up his skin, like a wine bag, in the cave out of which that river flows.
GB73439. Bronze AE 11, Sawaya 786 ff.; SNG Cop 89; BMC Phoenicia p. 56, 1 ff.; RPC I -, VF, weight 0.830 g, maximum diameter 11.3 mm, Berytus (Beirut, Lebanon) mint, 114 - 117 A.D.; obverse Marsyas advancing left, carrying wine skin over shoulder, CO-L divided across field; reverse forepart of galley right, BER above; $75.00 (65.25)


Roman Republic, Anonymous Luceria, 211 - 206 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
In 321 B.C., the Roman army was deceived into thinking Luceria was under siege by the Samnites. Hurrying to relieve their allies the army walked into an ambush and were defeated at the famous Battle of the Caudine Forks. The Samnites occupied Luceria but were thrown out after a revolt. The city sought Roman protection and in 320 B.C. was granted the status of Colonia Togata, which meant it was ruled by the Roman Senate. In order to strengthen the ties between the two cities, 2,500 Romans moved to Luceria. From then on, Luceria was known as a steadfast supporter of Rome.
RR75356. Bronze uncia, Crawford 97/7c, Sydenham 304, BMCRR Italy 173, SRCV I 1320,, F, nice green patina, weight 4.316 g, maximum diameter 17.9 mm, die axis 45o, Luceria mint, 211 - 206 B.C.; obverse helmeted head of Roma right, pellet (mark of value) behind; reverse ROMA, galley prow right, ROMA above, L and pellet (mark of value) below; scarce; $75.00 (65.25)


Constans, 9 September 337 - 19 January 350 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
This type, with the emperor holding a Victory on Globe, is only listed as an AE 3 (17-19 mm diameter).
RL57035. Bronze AE 2, Unpublished(?); cf. RIC VIII Thessalonica 122, LRBC 1649 (AE 3), VF, a little rough, weight 4.384 g, maximum diameter 22.9 mm, die axis 0o, Thessalonica mint, 348 - 350 A.D.; obverse D N CONSTA-NS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right, A behind; reverse FEL TEMP REPARATIO (happy times restored), Constans standing left on galley, Victory on globe in right hand, labarum (chi rho Christogram standard) in left, Victory seated in stern steering ship, A in left field, TSA in exergue; $70.00 (60.90)


Mark Antony, Triumvir and Imperator, 44 - 30 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
 
RR74119. Silver denarius, cf. Crawford 544/14, Sydenham 1216, BMCRR II East 190, RSC I 27 ff., aF, banker's mark, reverse off center, weight 3.112 g, maximum diameter 17.9 mm, die axis 90o, Patrae(?) mint, 32 - 31 B.C.; obverse ANTAVG / III VIRRPC, galley right with rowers, mast with banners at prow, border of dots; reverse LEG - [...], aquila (legionary eagle) between two legionary standards, border of dots; $65.00 (56.55)


Mark Antony, Triumvir and Imperator, 44 - 30 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
 
RS74144. Silver denarius, cf. Crawford 544/14, Sydenham 1216, BMCRR II East 190, RSC I 27 ff., Fair/Poor, weight 2.895 g, maximum diameter 16.2 mm, die axis 180o, Patrae(?) mint, 32 - 31 B.C.; obverse ANTAVG / III VIRRPC, galley right with rowers, mast with banners at prow, border of dots; reverse LEG - [...], aquila (legionary eagle) between two legionary standards, border of dots; $65.00 (56.55)


Mark Antony, Triumvir and Imperator, 44 - 30 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
 
RR74098. Silver denarius, cf. Crawford 544/14, Sydenham 1216, BMCRR II East 190, RSC I 27 ff., Fair, weight 3.364 g, maximum diameter 16.1 mm, die axis 135o, Patrae(?) mint, 32 - 31 B.C.; obverse ANTAVG / III VIRRPC, galley right with rowers, mast with banners at prow, border of dots; reverse LEG - [...], aquila (legionary eagle) between two legionary standards, border of dots; $60.00 (52.20)


Mark Antony, Triumvir and Imperator, 44 - 30 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
 
RR74107. Silver denarius, cf. Crawford 544/14, Sydenham 1216, BMCRR II East 190, RSC I 27 ff., aF, weight 3.089 g, maximum diameter 17.3 mm, die axis 45o, Patrae(?) mint, 32 - 31 B.C.; obverse ANTAVG / III VIRRPC, galley right with rowers, mast with banners at prow, border of dots; reverse LEG - [...], aquila (legionary eagle) between two legionary standards, border of dots; $60.00 (52.20)


Roman Republic, Anonymous, c. 90 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
In 91 B.C., the tribune Marcus Livius Drusus proposed extending Roman citizenship to allied Italian cities, but was assassinated, leading to the Social War.
RR71889. Bronze semis, Crawford 339/2, Sydenham 679a, BMCRR 2196, SRCV I 901, F, weight 4.213 g, maximum diameter 21.7 mm, die axis 270o, Rome mint, c. 90 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Saturn right, S (mark of value) behind; reverse prow right, S (mark of value) above, ROMA below; $50.00 (43.50)


Tripolis, Phoenicia, c. 77 - 76 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Although this type is dated, the date it was struck is uncertain. Cohen dates the civic era from 205 B.C., when Tripolis received autonomy from the Seleukid Kingdom.
GB74036. Bronze AE 16, BMC Phoenicia p. 203, 15 ff.; SNG Cop 272; HGC 10 312 (S); Cohen DCA 726 (R2), F, weight 3.616 g, maximum diameter 15.9 mm, die axis 180o, Tripolis mint, c. 77 - 76 B.C.; obverse bust of Tyche right, wearing turreted crown and veil, palm frond behind shoulder; reverse prow right, pilei (caps of the Dioscuri) above, LΘK (year 29) downward on left, TPIΠOΛITΩN below; scarce; $50.00 (43.50)


Sidon, Phoenicia, 174 - 150 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Sidon has been inhabited since very early in prehistory. In the years before Christianity, Sidon had many conquerors: Assyrians, Babylonians, Egyptians, Greeks, and finally Romans. Sidon is mentioned by the prophets Isaiah (e.g. Isaiah 23:2,4,12), Jeremiah (Jeremiah 25:22, 27:3, 47:4), Ezekiel (Ezekiel 27:8, 28:21, 32:30) and Joel (Joel 3:4). Jesus visited Sidon on (Matthew 15:21, Mark 3:8, Mark 7:24, Luke 6:17). Paul sailed for Rome from Sidon (Acts 27:3,4).
GB90873. Bronze AE 19, BMC Phoenicia p. 155, 87; SNG Cop 209; SGCV II 5958; Lindgren -, F, bevelled edge, center dimples, weight 4.277 g, maximum diameter 18.7 mm, die axis 90o, Sidon mint, 174 - 150 B.C.; obverse turreted head of Tyche right, letter or letters behind(?); reverse rudder horizontal with blade left, Phoenician inscription in two lines above and two below: "Of the Sidonians, the metropolis of Kambe, of Hippo, of Kition, and of Tyre"; from the Butte College Foundation, ex Lindgren; $45.00 (39.15)


Antoninus Pius, August 138 - 7 March 161 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Annona was the goddess of harvest and her main attribute is grain. This reverse suggests the arrival of grain by sea from the provinces (especially from Africa) and its distribution to the people.
RB73741. Orichalcum dupondius, RIC III 656, BMCRE IV 1330, Cohen II 36, SRCV II 4264, aF, rough, weight 11.298 g, maximum diameter 25.4 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 140 - 144 A.D.; obverse ANTONINVS AVG PI-VS P P TR P COS I, radiate head right; reverse ANNONA AVG, Annona standing slightly right, head right, two stalks of grain downward in right over modius at feet on left, cornucopia in right, ships stern in background on right, S - C flanking across field; $45.00 (39.15)


Mark Antony, Triumvir and Imperator, 44 - 30 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
 
RR74109. Silver denarius, cf. Crawford 544/14, Sydenham 1216, BMCRR II East 190, RSC I 27 ff., Fair/Poor, weight 2.990 g, maximum diameter 18.1 mm, die axis 1801o, Patrae(?) mint, 32 - 31 B.C.; obverse ANTAVG / III VIRRPC, galley right with rowers, mast with banners at prow, border of dots; reverse LEG - [...], aquila (legionary eagle) between two legionary standards, border of dots; $45.00 (39.15)


Amphipolis, Macedonia, c. 187 - 31 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
In 168 B.C., the Romans invaded Macedonia and overthrew King Perseus in the First Battle of Pydna. In 149 B.C., Andriskos, at that time ruler of Adramyttium only, claiming to be Perseus' son, announced his intention to retake Macedonia from Rome. Andriskos travelled to Syria to request military help from Demetrius Soter of Syria. Demetrius instead handed him over Rome. Andriskos escaped captivity, raised a Thracian army, invaded Macedonia, and defeated the Roman praetor Publius Juventius. Andriskos then declared himself King Philip VI of Macedonia. In 148 B.C., Andriskos conquered Thessaly and made an alliance with Carthage, thus bringing the Roman wrath on him. In 148 B.C., in what the Romans called the Fourth Macedonian War, he was defeated by the Roman praetor Q. Caecilius Metellus at the Second Battle of Pydna. He fled to Thrace, whose prince gave him up to Rome. Andriskos' brief reign over Macedonia was marked by cruelty and extortion. After this Macedonia was formally reduced to a Roman province.
BB69295. Bronze semis, cf. SNG Evelpidis 1145, SNG ANS 135 - 136 (monograms), SNG Cop 69 - 71 (same), SNG Dreer 217 (same), BMC Macedonia -, aF, weight 8.612 g, maximum diameter 20.7 mm, die axis 315o, Amphipolis mint, Roman rule, c. 187 - 31 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Zeus right, S behind; reverse prow right, ME monogram over S left, ∆Y monogram right, AMΦIΠO/ΛITΩN in two lines divided above and below; scarce; $40.00 (34.80)


Amphipolis, Macedonia, c. 187 - 31 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
After Rome defeated Perseus of Macedonia in 168 B.C., Amphipolis became the capital one of the four merides (mini-republics) created by the Romans out of the kingdom of the Antigonids. In 149 B.C. Andriskos, claiming to be Perseus' son, declared himself King Philip VI of Macedonia, conquered Thessaly, and allied with Carthage. After Andriskos was defeated in 148 B.C., in what the Romans called the Fourth Macedonian War, the merides were dissolved and Macedonia was formally reduced to a Roman province.
GB75341. Bronze semis, cf. SNG Evelpidis 1145, SNG ANS 135 - 136 (monograms), SNG Cop 69 - 71 (same), SNG Dreer 217 (same), BMC Macedonia -, aF, flan crack, weight 4.895 g, maximum diameter 22.0 mm, die axis 0o, Amphipolis mint, Roman rule, c. 187 - 31 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Zeus right, S behind; reverse AMΦIΠO/ΛITΩN, prow right, ME monogram over S left, ∆Y monogram right, AMΦIΠO/ΛITΩN in two lines divided above and below; rare; $40.00 (34.80)


Constans, 9 September 337 - 19 January 350 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Around 350, Pope Julius I declared that Christ's birth would be celebrated on December 25. This was in Rome, while in Eastern Christianity the birth of Jesus was already celebrated in connection with the Epiphany on January 6. Even in the West, the January 6 celebration of the nativity of Jesus seems to have continued until after 380. The December 25 celebration was imported into the East later: in Antioch by John Chrysostom towards the end of the 4th century, probably in 388, and in Alexandria only in the following century.
RL71497. Bronze AE 3, RIC VIII Siscia 244, VF, green patina, earthen encrustation, weight 2.592 g, maximum diameter 18.9 mm, die axis 180o, 4th officina, Siscia (Sisak, Croatia) mint, 348 - 350 A.D.; obverse D N CONSTANS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse FEL TEMP REPARATIO (happy times restored), Constans standing left in Galley, labarum in left, Phoenix on globe in right hand, at stern Victory steering, ∆SIS and control-mark in ex; $34.00 (29.58)


Arados, Phoenicia, c. 242 - 166 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
In 259 B.C. Arados increased her autonomy and dominated a federation of nearby cities including Gabala, Karne, Marathos and Simyra. Thus began the era of Aradus, to which the subsequent coins of the city are dated. Arados was not completely independent, however, the Seleukids retained overlordship.
BB62559. Bronze AE 18, BMC Phoenicia p. 13, 88 - 90; Duyrat 1374 ff., F, weight 2.189 g, maximum diameter 17.6 mm, die axis 45o, Arados mint, c. 242 - 166 B.C.; obverse turreted bust of Tyche right; reverse prow of galley left, with Athena figurehead, Greek AP (Arados) monogram above, no club above, no date below; from the Aiello Collection; $32.00 (27.84)


Amphipolis, Macedonia, c. 187 - 31 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
After Rome defeated Perseus of Macedonia in 168 B.C., Amphipolis became the capital one of the four merides (mini-republics) created by the Romans out of the kingdom of the Antigonids. In 149 B.C. Andriskos, claiming to be Perseus' son, declared himself King Philip VI of Macedonia, conquered Thessaly, and allied with Carthage. After Andriskos was defeated in 148 B.C., in what the Romans called the Fourth Macedonian War, the merides were dissolved and Macedonia was formally reduced to a Roman province.
BB74636. Bronze semis, cf. SNG ANS 135 - 136 (monograms), SNG Cop 69 - 71 (same), SNG Dreer 217 (same), BMC Macedonia -, aF, weight 5.495 g, maximum diameter 21.3 mm, die axis 90o, Amphipolis mint, Roman rule, c. 187 - 31 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Zeus right, S behind; reverse AMΦIΠO/ΛITΩN, prow right, AMΦIΠO/ΛITΩN in two lines divided above and below; $26.00 (22.62)


Mark Antony, Triumvir and Imperator, 44 - 30 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
 
RR74108. Silver denarius, cf. Crawford 544/14, Sydenham 1216, BMCRR II East 190, RSC I 27 ff., Fair/Poor, weight 2.848 g, maximum diameter 16.2 mm, die axis 180o, Patrae(?) mint, 32 - 31 B.C.; obverse ANTAVG / III VIRRPC, galley right with rowers, mast with banners at prow, border of dots; reverse LEG - [...], aquila (legionary eagle) between two legionary standards, border of dots; $14.00 (12.18)


Roman Military in Macedonia, c. 168 B.C., Imitative of Type from Histiaia, North Euboea, Greece

Click for a larger photo
Sear notes crude Histiaia imitations seem to have been struck in Macedonia just prior to the Roman victory in 168 B.C. During the Republic, Roman military mints sometimes struck imitative types to make local payments. Examples include Thasian imitatives in Macedonia and Philip Philadelphos imitatives at Antioch. This imitative is likely a Roman military issue.
BB74746. Silver tetrobol, See SGCV I p. 233 note following #2498; regarding imitatives of a 2nd century B.C. type from Histiaia, North Euboea, Greece, aF, weight 1.712 g, maximum diameter 13.7 mm, die axis 0o, Roman military mint, c. 168 B.C.; obverse head of nymph Histiaia right, wreathed with vine, hair rolled, wearing earring and necklace; reverse IΣTI−AEΩN (counter-clockwise starting lower right), nymph Histiaia seated right on stern of a galley, stylis in right hand, ornate apluster; $4.00 (3.48)




  



CLICK HERE TO SEE MORE FROM THIS CATEGORY - FORVM's PRIOR SALES


REFERENCES

Schaaff, Ulrich. Mnzen der rmischen Kaiserzeit mit Schiffsdarstellungen im Rmisch-Germanischen Zentralmuseum. (Munich, 2003).

Catalog current as of Saturday, August 01, 2015.
Page created in 2.621 seconds
Ships