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Home>Catalog>CollectingThemes>Nautical&Marine>Ships PAGE 3/4«««1234»»»

Galleys and Other Ships on Ancient Coins


Postumus, Summer 260 - Spring 269 A.D., Struck by Aureolus
Click for a larger photo Struck by Aureolus in the name of Postumus during his hold of Milan against Gallienus. Gallienus died during the siege but the new emperor Claudius brought the rebellion to an end.
RB90489. Bronze antoninianus, small module; RIC 372, Cohen 20, Elmer 616, Schulzki AGK 6a, Cunetio 2492 - 2493, EF, nice portrait, unusual reverse, tight flan, weight 2.282 g, maximum diameter 18.2 mm, die axis 135o, Mediolanum (Milan, Italy) mint, 267 - middle 268 A.D.; obverse IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse CONCORD EQVIT, Concordia standing left, pouring liquid from patera in right, prow at feet on left, rudder on globe behind in left, S in exergue; $100.00 SALE PRICE $90.00

Samos, Islands off Ionia, c. 400 - 380 B.C.
Click for a larger photo Samos is the birth palce of Pythagoras. One of the famous attractions of the island is the aqueduct-tunnel which was dug through a mountain to bring water to the city from an inland secret the spring. The tunnel was in use for a very long period and discovered in 19th century thanks to Herodotos' writing of it. The tunnel is over 1000m long, an engineering marvel dug from both ends by two simultaneously working teams.
GS71552. Silver diobol, Barron p. 212, 1 ff.; SNG Cop 1690; SNGvA 2295; SNG Kayhan 667; BMC Ionia p. 363, 140 ff.; HGC 6 1224 (R2), F, grainy, weight 1.099 g, maximum diameter 9.8 mm, die axis 90o, Samos mint, c. 400 - 380 B.C.; obverse facing lion head (scalp?); reverse prow of Samian galley right, ΣA below; rare; $100.00 SALE PRICE $90.00

Roman Republic, L.P.D.A.P. Series, c. 91 B.C.
Click for a larger photo The Lex Papiria de assis pondere et sestertio feriundo (Papirian Law concerning the weight of the as and the striking of the sestertius) of 91 (or maybe 90) B.C. re-authorized the production of silver sestertii, which hadn't been seen for over a century. More importantly, it reduced the standard weight of the as to a half ounce (the semuncial standard).This law is attested by Pliny, who says that "mox lege Papiria semunciarii asses facti" (soon by the Papirian Law asses were made semuncial). What is most interesting is that this law is attested on the first coins struck under its terms. Sestertii bear the letters E.L.P. for "e lege Papiria" (by the Papirian Law) and bronzes have the formula L.P.D.A.P. for "lege Papiria de assis pondere."
RR71925. Bronze quadrans, Crawford 338/4c, RBW Collection 1239 (same reverse die), Sydenham 678c, SRCV I 1193, BMCRR -, VF, uneven strike, weight 3.353 g, maximum diameter 16.4 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, c. 91 B.C.; obverse head of Hercules right, wearing Nemean Lion scalp headdress, three pellets behind; reverse prow right, three pellets (mark of value) over L.P.D.A.P. (Lex Papiria de assis pondere) above; from the Andrew McCabe collection, ex Roma Numismatics e-auction 11, lot 142; scarce; $100.00 SALE PRICE $90.00

Roman Republic, Anonymous, c. 90 B.C.
Click for a larger photo In 91 B.C., the tribune Marcus Livius Drusus proposed extending Roman citizenship to allied Italian cities, but was assassinated, leading to the Social War.
RR71963. Bronze semis, Crawford 339/2, Sydenham 679a, BMCRR 2196, SRCV I 901, F, nice green patina, edge flaw, scratches, weight 6.921 g, maximum diameter 25.3 mm, die axis 45o, Rome mint, c. 90 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Saturn right, S (mark of value) behind; reverse prow right, S (mark of value) above, ROMA below; from the Andrew McCabe collection, ex Roma Numismatics e-auction 10, lot 527; $100.00 SALE PRICE $90.00

Salonina, Augusta 254 - c. September 268 A.D., Kyzikos, Mysia
Click for a larger photo In 74 B.C. Cyzicus, allied with Rome, withstood a siege by King Mithridates VI of Pontus. Rome rewarded this loyalty with territory and with municipal independence which lasted until the reign of Tiberius. When it was incorporated into the Empire, it was made the capital of Mysia, afterward of Hellespontus. Cyzicus was one of the great cities of the ancient world.
RP53294. Bronze AE 23, SNG Cop 143, BMC Mysia 287, F, weight 5.654 g, maximum diameter 24.1 mm, die axis 45o, Cyzicus (Kapu Dagh, Turkey) mint, obverse CAΛΩNEINA CE, draped bust right, wearing stephane, set on crescent; reverse KYZIKHN KEOKOPΩ, quinquereme with four oarsmen right, Triton blowing horn right; $95.00 SALE PRICE $85.50

Roman Republic, C. Vibius C.F. Pansa, 90 B.C.
Click for a larger photo In 90 BC, the Social War continued. The Etruscans all Italians who did not oppose Rome during the Social War were granted Roman citizenship. Corfinium in south-central Italy was the center of the rebellion against Rome.
RR56747. Copper as, Crawford 342/7d; Sydenham 690b; SRCV I 744, F, rough, irregular flan, weight 9.190 g, maximum diameter 26.3 mm, die axis 270o, Rome mint, 90 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Janus, I above; reverse ROMA, three galley prows right, C VIBI AV (AV ligate) in exergue, I right; $95.00 SALE PRICE $85.50

Macedonian Kingdom, Demetrius I Poliorketes, 306 - 283 B.C.
Click for a larger photo The B A on the reverse refers to BAΣIΛEΩΣ AΛEΞAN∆POY, King Alexander (the Great). The Macedonian Kingdom continued to issue coinage in Alexander's name long after his death.

The prow refers to Demetrios' defeat of Menelaus, Ptolemy's brother, in the naval Battle of Salamis, completely destroying the naval power of Egypt.
GB66864. Bronze AE 15, Newell 163, SNG Cop 1185, SNG München 1056; SNG Alpha Bank 956, gVF, weight 2.847 g, maximum diameter 15.5 mm, die axis 0o, Carian(?) mint, 290 - 283 B.C.; obverse Demetrios' head right, wearing crested Corinthian helmet; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ ∆HMHTPIOY, prow right, B A above, AP monogram below, double axe before; $95.00 SALE PRICE $85.50

Roman Republic, L PL H (L. Plautius Hypsaeus?), 194 - 189 B.C.
Click for a larger photo As noted by Sydenham, the reading of the monogram is uncertain and Mommsen's suggestion, L. Plautius Hypsaeus, is purely conjectural.
RR69350. Bronze as, Crawford 134/2 (same dies); BMCRR Rome 555 (same dies); Sydenham 333; SRCV I 668, F, weight 28.997 g, maximum diameter 36.6 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 194 - 189 B.C.; obverse laureate and bearded head of Janus, I (mark of value) above; reverse galley prow right, LPLH monogram above, I (mark of value) before, ROMA in ex; from the Andrew McCabe Collection, large 36.6 mm bronze!; scarce; $95.00 SALE PRICE $85.50

Roman Republic, Q. Caecilius Metellus, 130 B.C.
Click for a larger photo The first Acta Diurna (latin: Daily Acts) appeared around 131 B.C. These were daily official notices (a sort of daily gazette) carved on stone or metal and presented on message boards in public places in Rome. Content included results of legal proceedings and trials, and was later expanded to include public notices and other information such as prominent births, marriages and deaths. After a couple of days the notices were taken down and archived (though no intact copy has survived to the present day).
RR71973. Bronze quadrans, Crawford 256/4, Sydenham 510b, BMCRR I Rome 1061 ff., SRCV I 1160, aVF, green patina, scratches, weight 6.054 g, maximum diameter 21.6 mm, die axis 225o, Rome mint, 130 B.C.; obverse head of Hercules right clad in Nemean Lion scalp, three pellets (mark of value) behind; reverse prow right; Q.METE (ME and TE ligate) above, three pellets (mark of value) before, ROMA in exergue; from the Andrew McCabe Collection, ex Roma Numismatics e-auction 8, lot 510; $95.00 SALE PRICE $85.50

Roman Republic, Second Punic War Vanquished Enemy Overstrike, 211 - 204 B.C.
Click for a larger photo This coin is from Andrew McCabe's group H1, a previously unrecognized late Second Punic War issue, overstruck on the coins of Rome's vanquished enemies, from a mint or mints in Southern Italy, Sicily or Sardinia. The most common undertype is Carthaginian Tanit / horse types, but coins of Capua, the Bretti, Syracuse and other coins of the vanquished were also overstruck. For reasons unknown, these coins were overstruck on types that weighed half the standard for the same denomination at Rome. In the past these coins were often assumed, based on their weight, to date to the late second century or first century B.C.
RR65632. Bronze triens, McCabe Anonymous p. 265, H1.Tr.6 (same dies), RBW Collection 207, cf. Crawford 56/4, Sydenham 143b, SRCV I 911 (Rome mint, normal weight c. 14g), F, weight 7.187 g, maximum diameter 22.9 mm, die axis 270o, Southern Italy, Sicily or Sardinia mint, 211 - 204 B.C.; obverse helmeted head of Minerva right, four pellets above; reverse prow of galley right, apotropaic eye on side of hull, long diagonal prow stem, ROMA above, four pellets below; from the Andrew McCabe Collection, ex Roma Numismatics e-auction 11, lot 106; $90.00 SALE PRICE $81.00

Roman Republic, Q. Marcius Libo, c. 148 B.C.
Click for a larger photo In 184, Cato the Elder, champion of the ancient austere Roman way of life, began a puritanical campaign to preserve the mos majorum (ancestral custom) and combat Greek influence. He passed luxury taxes and strictly limited eligibility for the Senate. Quarrels among Greek cities and leagues increased the conviction in Rome that there will be no peace in Greece until Rome takes full control.
RR66642. Copper Sextans, Crawford 215/6, Sydenham 396f, SRCV I 1289, F, weight 6.328 g, maximum diameter 21.0 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, c. 148 B.C.; obverse head of Mercury right in winged petasus, two pellets above; reverse prow of galley right, Q MARC (MA ligate) above, LIBO before, ROMA below; very scarce; $90.00 SALE PRICE $81.00

Roman Republic, L. Saufeius, 152 B.C.
Click for a larger photo In Roman mythology, Janus (or Ianus) was the god of gates, doors, doorways, and of beginnings and endings. Janus is one of the few major deities in Roman mythology that does not have a Greek origin or counterpart.
RR68445. Bronze as, SRCV I 720, Crawford 204/2, Sydenham 385, aF, weight 23.522 g, maximum diameter 31.4 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 152 B.C.; obverse laureate and bearded head of Janus, I above; reverse prow right, L•SAVF and crescent above, ROMA below, I right; $90.00 SALE PRICE $81.00

Roman Republic, Imitative(?), c. 150 - 80 B.C.
Click for a larger photo The style is unusual, the symbol before the prow is obscure, and the weight is light for earlier types that seem most similar. This coin is likely an imitative.
RR69093. Bronze quadrans, cf. Crawford 87/4 (V before prow), VF, well centered on a tight flan, weight 4.409 g, maximum diameter 20.9 mm, die axis 225o, Unofficial(?) mint, c. 150 - 80 B.C.; obverse head of Hercules right clad in Nemean Lion scalp, three pellets behind; reverse prow of galley right, ROMA above, uncertain symbol (dolphin?) or letter (V?) right, three pellets below; rare; $90.00 SALE PRICE $81.00

Roman Republic, L Memmius Galeria, 106 B.C.
Click for a larger photo A very unusual design, with the value mark above the moneyers name on the reverse.
RR69096. Bronze quadrans, Crawford 313/4, Sydenham 575b (R6), BMCRR I Rome 1359, SRCV I 1189, F, weight 6.328 g, maximum diameter 18.3 mm, die axis 270o, Rome mint, 106 B.C.; obverse head of Hercules right clad in Nemean Lion scalp headdress, three pellets behind; reverse prow right, three pellets over L MEMMI (ME ligate) above, Venus figurehead on prow, Cupid on right facing left crowning head of Venus, ROMA below; from the Andrew McCabe Collection; rare; $90.00 SALE PRICE $81.00

Roman Republic, Anonymous (Victory and Spearhead), c. 189 - 180 B.C.
Click for a larger photo In 188 B.C., through the peace treaty of Apamea (in Phrygia), the Romans forced the Seleucid king, Antiochus III, to surrender all his Greek and Anatolian possessions as far east as the Taurus Mountains, to pay 15,000 talents over a period of 12 years and to surrender to Rome the former Carthaginian general Hannibal, his elephants and his fleet, and furnish hostages, including the king's eldest son, Demetrius. Rome became the master of the eastern Mediterranean while Antiochus III's empire was reduced to Syria, Mesopotamia, and western Iran.
RR69275. Bronze semis, Crawford 145/2, Sydenham 293a, SRCV I 814, F, weight 16.895 g, maximum diameter 26.6 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 189 - 180 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Saturn right, S behind; reverse prow right, spearhead and Victory flying right holding wreath above, S before, ROMA below; from the Andrew McCabe Collection; very rare; $90.00 SALE PRICE $81.00

Roman Republic, C. Scribonius, 154 B.C.
Click for a larger photo In 154 B.C., The Lusitanians harassed the inhabitants of the Roman provinces in Hispania. At the same time, the Celtiberians of Numantia on the Douro revolted against their Roman occupation.
RR69276. Bronze as, Crawford 201/2, Sydenham 381, BMCRR Rome 733, SRCV I 718, F, weight 16.341 g, maximum diameter 31.2 mm, die axis 135o, Rome mint, 154 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Janus, I (mark of value) above; reverse prow right, C·SCR above, I (mark of value) before, ROMA below; from the Andrew McCabe Collection; $90.00 SALE PRICE $81.00

Roman Republic, M. Atilius Serranus, 148 B.C.
Click for a larger photo In Roman mythology, Janus (or Ianus) was the god of gates, doors, doorways, and of beginnings and endings. Janus is believed to be one of the few major deities in Roman mythology that does not have a Greek origin or counterpart.
RR69277. Bronze as, Crawford 214/2, Sydenham 399, BMCRR Rome 692, SRCV I 727, aF, weight 23.625 g, maximum diameter 30.8 mm, die axis 90o, Rome mint, 148 B.C.; obverse laureate head of bearded Janus, I (mark of value) above; reverse prow right, M ATILI above, I (mark of value) right, ROMA below; from the Andrew McCabe Collection; scarce; $90.00 SALE PRICE $81.00

Roman Republic, SAFRA (Spurius Afranius?), 150 B.C.
Click for a larger photo Traditionally attributed to S. Afranius, however, Sear states, "SAFRA would appear to represent a cognomen only, no stop being inserted after the first letter." -- Roman Coins and Their Values by David R. Sear
RR69283. Bronze as, Crawford 206/2, Sydenham 389, BMCRR Rome 675, SRCV I 722, F, weight 27.448 g, maximum diameter 33.427 mm, die axis 270o, Rome mint, 150 B.C.; obverse laureate head of bearded Janus, I (mark of value) above; reverse galley prow right, SAFRA above, dolphin swimming downward on right, ROMA below; from the Andrew McCabe Collection; $90.00 SALE PRICE $81.00

Roman Republic, Q. Titius, 90 B.C.
Click for a larger photo The moneyer Q. Titi is known only from his coinage.
RR69355. Bronze as, Crawford 341/4a; Sydenham 694, BMCRR Rome 2231, SRCV I 742, F, corrosion, weight 16.282 g, maximum diameter 27.4 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 90 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Janus with long pointed beard; reverse prow of galley right, Q TITI above, no control symbol; from the Andrew McCabe Collection; $90.00 SALE PRICE $81.00

Roman Republic, Anonymous Luceria, 211 - 208 B.C.
Click for a larger photo In 321 B.C., the Roman army was deceived into thinking Luceria was under siege by the Samnites. Hurrying to relieve their allies the army walked into an ambush and were defeated at the famous Battle of the Caudine Forks. The Samnites occupied Luceria but were thrown out after a revolt. The city sought Roman protection and in 320 B.C. was granted the status of Colonia Togata, which meant it was ruled by the Roman Senate. In order to strengthen the ties between the two cities, 2,500 Romans moved to Luceria. From then on, Luceria was known as a steadfast supporter of Rome.
RR71960. Bronze triens, Crawford 97/25, Sydenham 178b, BMCRR Italy 163, SRCV I 932, F, green patina, rough, porous, weight 11.420 g, maximum diameter 26.4 mm, die axis 270o, Luceria mint, 211 - 208 B.C.; obverse helmeted head of Minerva right, four pellets above, L below; reverse prow of galley right, ROMA above, L before, four pellets below; from the Andrew McCabe collection, ex Roma Numismatics e-auction 10, lot 535; scarce; $90.00 SALE PRICE $81.00

Roman Republic, Anonymous Luceria, 211 - 206 B.C.
Click for a larger photo In 321 B.C., the Roman army was deceived into thinking Luceria was under siege by the Samnites. Hurrying to relieve their allies the army walked into an ambush and were defeated at the famous Battle of the Caudine Forks. The Samnites occupied Luceria but were thrown out after a revolt. The city sought Roman protection and in 320 B.C. was granted the status of Colonia Togata, which meant it was ruled by the Roman Senate. In order to strengthen the ties between the two cities, 2,500 Romans moved to Luceria. From then on, Luceria was known as a steadfast supporter of Rome.
RR68176. Bronze uncia, Crawford 97/7c, Sydenham 304, BMCRR Italy 173, 169, SRCV I 1320,, F, some corrosion, weight 5.081 g, maximum diameter 19.7 mm, die axis 90o, Luceria mint, 211 - 206 B.C.; obverse helmeted head of Roma right, pellet (mark of value) behind; reverse ROMA, galley prow right, ROMA above, L and pellet (mark of value) below; $85.00 SALE PRICE $76.50

Roman Republic, C. Licinius L.f. Macer, 84 B.C.
Click for a larger photo Odysseus, Ulysses to the Romans, was a legendary Greek king of Ithaca and a hero of Homer's epic poem the Odyssey. Odysseus also plays a key role in Homer's Iliad and other works in that same Epic Cycle. Odysseus is most famous for the ten eventful years he took to return home after his famous Trojan Horse ploy and the capture the city of Troy.
RR69329. Bronze as, Crawford 354/3a, Sydenham 734, SRCV I 756, F, weight 12.361 g, maximum diameter 27.6 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 84 B.C.; obverse laureate head of bearded Janus, I (mark of value) above; reverse galley prow right, male figure standing facing on deck, long staff vertical in right hand, figure dividing EX - S C across field; from the Andrew McCabe Collection; $85.00 SALE PRICE $76.50

Constans, 9 September 337 - 19 January 350 A.D.
Click for a larger photo This type, with the emperor holding a Victory on Globe, is only listed as an AE 3 (17-19 mm diameter).
RL57035. Bronze AE 2, Unpublished(?); cf. RIC VIII Thessalonica 122, LRBC 1649 (AE 3), VF, a little rough, weight 4.384 g, maximum diameter 22.9 mm, die axis 0o, Thessalonica mint, 348 - 350 A.D.; obverse D N CONSTA-NS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right, A behind; reverse FEL TEMP REPARATIO, Constans standing left on galley, Victory on globe in right hand, labarum (chi rho Christogram standard) in left, Victory seated in stern steering ship, A in left field, TSA in ex; $80.00 SALE PRICE $72.00

Roman Republic, Anonymous Luceria, c. 206 - 195 B.C.
Click for a larger photo In 321 B.C., the Roman army was deceived into thinking Luceria was under siege by the Samnites. Hurrying to relieve their allies the army walked into an ambush and were defeated at the famous Battle of the Caudine Forks. The Samnites occupied Luceria but were thrown out after a revolt. The city sought Roman protection and in 320 B.C. was granted the status of Colonia Togata, which meant it was ruled by the Roman Senate. In order to strengthen the ties between the two cities, 2,500 Romans moved to Luceria. From then on, Luceria was known as a steadfast supporter of Rome.
RR69343. Copper Sextans, Crawford 97/20a or 97/27 (same types), Sydenham 128 (R4), SRCV I 1224, F, scrape and scratches, weight 4.992 g, maximum diameter 21.4 mm, die axis 270o, Luceria mint, c. 206 - 195 B.C.; obverse head of Mercury right in winged petasus, two pellets above, L below; reverse prow of galley right, ROMA above, two pellets below; from the Andrew McCabe Collection; scarce; $80.00 SALE PRICE $72.00

Roman Republic, L. Saufeius, 152 B.C.
Click for a larger photo Saturn was an ancient Roman god of fertility, especially of agriculture and usually carries a sickle as his symbol. Saturday is named for Saturn. Romans celebrated the Feast of Saturnalia at the Winter Solstice. Homes were decorated with greenery. Friends visited and exchanged gifts. Slaves and masters ate at the same table. War and executions were postponed. Aspects of Saturnalia survive today in Christmas celebrations and carnival festivals around the world.
RR69359. Bronze semis, Crawford 204/3, Sydenham 385a, BMCRR Rome 839, SRCV I 853, aVF, porous, weight 7.088 g, maximum diameter 22.6 mm, die axis 45o, Rome mint, 152 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Saturn right, S (mark of value) behind; reverse galley prow right, hull ornamented with apotropaic eye, crescent over L SAVF (VF ligate) above, S (mark of value) on right, ROMA below; from the Andrew McCabe Collection; $80.00 SALE PRICE $72.00

Roman Republic, L. Cornelius Cinna, 169 - 157 B.C.
Click for a larger photo On 22 June 168 B.C., at the Battle of Pydna (in southern Macedonia) Roman forces under Lucius Aemilius Paulus decisively defeated Perseus and his Macedonian forces, ending the Third Macedonian War. Perseus was captured spent the rest of his life in captivity at Alba Fucens, near Rome. The Macedonian Kingdom was broken up into four smaller states. All the Greek cities which offered aid to Macedonia, even just in words, were punished. Rome took hundreds of prisoners from the leading families of Macedonia, including the historian Polybius.
RR72169. Bronze as, Crawford 178/1, Sydenham 368, BMCRR I Rome 804, SRCV I 699, aF, weight 32.645 g, maximum diameter 31.4 mm, die axis 90o, Rome mint, 169 - 157 B.C.; obverse laureate bearded head of Janus, I (mark of value) above; reverse galley prow right, CINA above, I (mark of value) right, ROMA below; $75.00 SALE PRICE $67.50

Roman, Two Bronze Nails, 1st Century B.C. - 1st Century A.D.
Click for a larger photo Called shielding tacks or nails, this type of Roman nail was used to affix lead shieldings on the bottom of Roman Galleys.
AI36105. Two bronze nails; broad flat "shield" heads, 1 inch tall, with wood stand, Choice, ex Tucker Collection; from the collection of Alex G. Malloy, former dealer in antiquities for 40 years; $70.00 SALE PRICE $63.00

Amphipolis, Macedonia, c. 187 - 31 B.C.
Click for a larger photo In 168 B.C., the Romans invaded Macedonia and overthrew King Perseus in the First Battle of Pydna. In 149 B.C., Andriskos, at that time ruler of Adramyttium only, claiming to be Perseus' son, announced his intention to retake Macedonia from Rome. Andriskos travelled to Syria to request military help from Demetrius Soter of Syria. Demetrius instead handed him over Rome. Andriskos escaped captivity, raised a Thracian army, invaded Macedonia, and defeated the Roman praetor Publius Juventius. Andriskos then declared himself King Philip VI of Macedonia. In 148 B.C., Andriskos conquered Thessaly and made an alliance with Carthage, thus bringing the Roman wrath on him. In 148 B.C., in what the Romans called the Fourth Macedonian War, he was defeated by the Roman praetor Q. Caecilius Metellus at the Second Battle of Pydna, and fled to Thrace, whose prince gave him up to Rome, thus marking the final end to Andriskos' reign of Macedonia. Andriskos' brief reign over Macedonia was marked by cruelty and extortion. After this Macedonia was formally reduced to a Roman province.
BB69295. Bronze semis, SNG ANS 135 - 136 var (monograms), SNG Cop 69 - 70 var (same), SNG Dreer 217 var (same), BMC Macedonia -, aF, weight 8.612 g, maximum diameter 20.7 mm, die axis 315o, Amphipolis mint, Roman rule, c. 187 - 31 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Zeus right, S behind; reverse AMΦIΠO/ΛITΩN, prow, S left, monograms right; scarce; $65.00 SALE PRICE $58.50

Roman Republic, Anonymous Luceria, c. 206 - 195 B.C.
Click for a larger photo In 321 B.C., the Roman army was deceived into thinking Luceria was under siege by the Samnites. Hurrying to relieve their allies the army walked into an ambush and were defeated at the famous Battle of the Caudine Forks. The Samnites occupied Luceria but were thrown out after a revolt. The city sought Roman protection and in 320 B.C. was granted the status of Colonia Togata, which meant it was ruled by the Roman Senate. In order to strengthen the ties between the two cities, 2,500 Romans moved to Luceria. From then on, Luceria was known as a steadfast supporter of Rome.
RR69349. Bronze quadrans, Crawford 97/19, Sydenham 178c, BMCRR Italy 212, SRCV I 1056, F, weight 5.378 g, maximum diameter 21.5 mm, die axis 0o, Luceria mint, 4th series, c. 206 - 195 B.C.; obverse head of Hercules right, wearing Nemean Lion scalp headdress, club left at neck truncation; reverse galley prow right, ROMA above, L right, three pellets below; from the Andrew McCabe Collection; $65.00 SALE PRICE $58.50

Roman Republic, Anonymous, Second Punic War, 211 - 206 B.C.
Click for a larger photo The Second Punic War was between Carthage and the Roman Republic from 218 to 201 B.C. Hannibal made a surprising crossing of the Alps and, reinforced by Gallic allies, delivered crushing victories over Roman armies in the battle of the Trebia, the giant ambush at Trasimene, and again at Cannae. Many Roman allies went over to Carthage. Against Hannibal's tactical genius, the Romans used the Fabian strategy. Rome blocked attempts to reinforce Hannibal and, more capable in siegecraft, recaptured all of the major cities that had defected. Meanwhile, Scipio Africanus took Carthago Nova and ended Punic rule in Iberia. The final showdown was the Battle of Zama in Africa. Scipio Africanus defeated Hannibal, harsh terms were imposed, and Carthage became a Roman client-state.
RR69667. Bronze semis, McCabe Anonymous G4.Sm.1 (same dies); cf. Crawford 56/3; Sydenham 143a; BMCRR I Rome 229; SRCV I 766, gF, rough, weight 19.085 g, maximum diameter 28.2 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 2nd Punic War, 211 - 206 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Saturn right, S behind; reverse galley prow right, S above, ROMA below, narrow tall curved prowstem with two horizontal bands; from the Butte College Foundation, ex Lindgren; $65.00 SALE PRICE $58.50



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REFERENCES

Schaaff, Ulrich. Münzen der römischen Kaiserzeit mit Schiffsdarstellungen im Römisch-Germanischen Zentralmuseum. (Munich, 2003).

Catalog current as of Wednesday, January 28, 2015.
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