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Home>Catalog>CollectingThemes>Nautical&Marine>Ships PAGE 3/4«««1234»»»

Galleys and Other Ships on Ancient Coins


Roman Republic, P. Nerva, 113 - 112 B.C.

Click for a larger photo In 113 B.C., the Germanic Cimbri and Teutones crossed the Danube into the lands of the Celtic Taurisci. The Taurisci appealed to Rome for help and the Senate agreed to drive the Germans back. After decisive victories over the Romans in 105 B.C., the Cimbri and Teutones divided forces and were then defeated separately by Gaius Marius in 102 B.C. and 101 B.C. respectively, ending the Cimbrian War. The defeat of the Teutones occurred at the Battle of Aquae Sextiae (near present-day Aix-en-Provence). According to Valerius Maximus and Florus, the king of the Teutones, Teutobod, was taken in irons after the Teutones were defeated by the Romans. Under the conditions of the surrender, three hundred married women were to be handed over as Roman slaves. When the matrons of the Teutones heard of this stipulation, they begged that they might instead be allowed to minister in the temples of Ceres and Venus. When their request was denied, the Teutonic women slew their own children. The next morning, all the women were found dead in each other's arms, having strangled each other during the night. This act passed into Roman legends of Germanic heroism. Some of the surviving Teutones captives were reported to have been among the rebelling Gladiators in the Third Servile War.RR71971. Bronze quadrans, Crawford 292/4a, Babelon Licinia 10, Sydenham 549b, BMCRR II Italy 529, RBW Collection 1129, SRCV I 1183, aVF, scratches, corrosion, weight 2.660 g, maximum diameter 16.5 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 113 - 112 B.C.; obverse head of Hercules right, in Nemean Lion's scalp headdress, three pellets behind, P NERVA (NE ligate) upwards before; reverse galley prow right, horse standing right above, three pellets before, ROMA below; from the Andrew McCabe Collection, ex Roma Numismatics e-auction 8, lot 521; scarce; $85.00 (€73.95)


Roman Republic, C. Papirius Turdus, 169 - 158 B.C.

Click for a larger photo In 169, Lex Voconia (The Voconian Law) prohibited Romans who owned property valued at 100,000 sesterces or more from making a woman their heir. The intent was to limit the wealth of women, who were presumed to expend it on useless luxury goods. The limit was not arbitrary but was the traditional property qualification for admission to the highest class in the Comitia Centuriata and the Equestrian Order. The Lex Voconia was evaded by avoiding registration in the census, but that entailed the loss of some rights. A form of trust was also used to evade the law until voided by the Lex Falcidia. Under Augustus, the Lex Papia Poppaea granted full inheritance rights to married women who were mothers of three children (if born free) or four children (if a freedwoman).RR71976. Bronze quadrans, Crawford 193/4, BMCRR I Rome 803, Sydenham 366c, Babelon Papiria 4, RBW Collection 829, SRCV I 1119, F, well centered on a tight slightly irregular flan, corrosion, weight 2.737 g, maximum diameter 20.4 mm, die axis 270o, Rome mint, 169 - 158 B.C.; obverse head of Hercules right, clad in Nemean Lion's scalp, three pellets (mark of value) behind; reverse galley prow right, TVRD (VR ligate) above, three pellets (mark of value) before, ROMA below; from the Andrew McCabe Collection, ex Roma Numismatics e-auction 8, lot 500; very rare; $85.00 (€73.95)


Roman Republic, OPEIMI (Q. Opimius?), 169 - 158 B.C.

Click for a larger photo Janus (or Ianus) was the god of gates, doors, doorways, beginnings and endings. He is most often depicted as having two faces or heads, facing in opposite directions. Janus is believed to be one of the few major deities in Roman mythology that does not have a Greek origin or counterpart.
RR72065. Bronze as, Crawford 188/1, Sydenham 362, BMCRR I Rome 596, SRCV I 702, F, rough green patina, old edge chip, weight 25.231 g, maximum diameter 33.05 mm, die axis 315o, Rome mint, 169 - 158 B.C.; obverse laureate and bearded head of Janus, I (mark of value) above; reverse prow right, O PEIMI (PEIMI ligate) above, I (mark of value) before, ROMA in exergue; ex Andrew McCabe Collection, ex Münzen & Medaillen GmbH Auction 19 (16 May 2006), lot 717, ex Gibboni Collection; $85.00 (€73.95)


Allectus, Summer 293 - 296 A.D.

Click for a larger photo  
RA72408. Billon quinarius, Rogiet 1043, Burnett, Coinage 216, RIC V 130 var (steersman standing aft), F, well centered and struck, weight 2.877 g, maximum diameter 20.2 mm, die axis 180o, Camulodunum (Colchester, England) mint, summer 293 - 296 A.D.; obverse IMP C ALLECTVS P AVG, radiate and cuirassed bust right; reverse VIRTVS AVG, Galley left, with mast, no waves below, QC in exergue; ex Robert T. Golan (Warrenton, NC); scarce; $85.00 (€73.95)


Gordian III, 29 July 238 - 25 February 244 A.D., Gadara, Peraea Judaea

Click for a larger photo To end their strong ties and increase dependence on Rome, when Roma annexed Arabia, the ten cities of the Decapolis were distributed among the adjacent Roman provinces. Adraa, Gerasa and Philadelphia went to the province of Arabia; Gadara, Pella and Capitolias seem to have been assigned to Judaea and the northerly cities went to the province of Syria. Still the prestige and honor of being a Decapolis city continued long after it had lost any real meaning.GB73437. Bronze AE 27, SNG ANS 1332 (same dies), Spijkerman 93, Soefar Collection 103, Rosenberger IV 90 var (obv leg, etc.), F, weight 9.356 g, maximum diameter 26.8 mm, die axis 0o, Gadara (Um Qais, Jordan) mint, 239 - 240 A.D.; obverse AYTOK K MAP ANTΩ ΓOP∆IANOC, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse war galley rowing right with navigator in stern, row of oarsmen, captain in prow, ΠOMΠ / ΓA∆APE/ΩN in three lines above, ΓT (year 303) below; $85.00 (€73.95)


Roman Republic, L. Saufeius, 152 B.C.

Click for a larger photo In Roman mythology, Janus (or Ianus) was the god of gates, doors, doorways, and of beginnings and endings. Janus is one of the few major deities in Roman mythology that does not have a Greek origin or counterpart.RR68445. Bronze as, SRCV I 720, Crawford 204/2, Sydenham 385, aF, weight 23.522 g, maximum diameter 31.4 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 152 B.C.; obverse laureate and bearded head of Janus, I above; reverse prow right, L•SAVF and crescent above, ROMA below, I right; $80.00 (€69.60)


Roman Republic, Butterfly and Vine-Branch Series, 169 - 158 B.C.

Click for a larger photo In 168 B.C., the Romans invaded Macedonia and overthrew King Perseus in the First Battle of Pydna. In 149 B.C., Andriskos, at that time ruler of Adramyttium only, claiming to be Perseus' son, announced his intention to retake Macedonia from Rome. Andriskos travelled to Syria to request military help from Demetrius Soter of Syria. Demetrius instead handed him over Rome. Andriskos escaped captivity, raised a Thracian army, invaded Macedonia, and defeated the Roman praetor Publius Juventius. Andriskos then declared himself King Philip VI of Macedonia. In 148 B.C., Andriskos conquered Thessaly and made an alliance with Carthage, thus bringing the Roman wrath on him. In 148 B.C., in what the Romans called the Fourth Macedonian War, he was defeated by the Roman praetor Q. Caecilius Metellus at the Second Battle of Pydna. He fled to Thrace, whose prince gave him up to Rome. Andriskos' brief reign over Macedonia was marked by cruelty and extortion. After this Macedonia was formally reduced to a Roman province.RR71927. Bronze quadrans, Crawford 184/4, Sydenham 296c, BMCRR 512, RBW Collection 784, SRCV I 1101, F, edge chip, weight 6.128 g, maximum diameter 20.1 mm, die axis 90o, Rome mint, 169 - 158 B.C.; obverse head of Hercules right, clad in Nemean Lion's scalp, three pellets (mark of value) behind; reverse prow of galley right, butterfly on vine-branch with grapes above, three pellets (mark of value) before, ROMA below; from the Andrew McCabe Collection; ex Roma Numismatics e-sale 3, 417; rare; $80.00 (€69.60)


Roman Republic, Anonymous, c. 169 - 158 B.C.

Click for a larger photo In 194 B.C., the Romans defeated the Boii in the Battle of Mutina, fought near Modena. The victory effectively ended the threat of the Gauls in Italy.RR71930. Bronze as, McCabe Anonymous p. 269, K2.AS.2 (same dies); cf. Crawford 56/2; Sydenham 143; BMCRR Rome 217 ff.; SRCV I 627, aVF, flan flaws, crack, patina edge flaking (stable), weight 27.262 g, maximum diameter 33.5 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, c. 169 - 158 B.C.; obverse laureate and bearded head of Janus, I (mark of value) above; reverse prow right, apotropaic eye on side of hull, flat topped deck structure, I (mark of value) above to right of deck structure, ROMA below; from the Andrew McCabe Collection, ex Roma Numismatics e-auction 11, lot 107; big 33 mm bronze!; scarce; $80.00 (€69.60)


Roman Republic, Anonymous (Victory), 211 - 195 B.C.

Click for a larger photo Minerva, equated with the Greek Athena, was the Roman virgin warrior goddess of poetry, medicine, wisdom, commerce, weaving, crafts, magic, and the inventor of music. She was worshipped on the Capitoline Hill as one of the Capitoline Triad along with Jupiter and Juno.RR71961. Bronze triens, Crawford 61/4, Sydenham 148b, BMCRR Italy 33, SRCV I 927, gF, corrosion, weight 11.665 g, maximum diameter 25.1 mm, die axis 90o, central Italy mint, 211 - 195 B.C.; obverse helmeted head of Minerva right, four pellets (mark of value) above; reverse prow of galley right, Victory holding wreath and flying right over ROMA above, four pellets (mark of value) below; from the Andrew McCabe Collection, ex Roma Numismatics e-auction 10, lot 531; scarce; $80.00 (€69.60)


Roman Republic, L.P.D.A.P. Series, c. 91 B.C.

Click for a larger photo The Lex Papiria de assis pondere et sestertio feriundo (Papirian Law concerning the weight of the as and the striking of the sestertius) of 91 (or maybe 90) B.C. re-authorized the production of silver sestertii, which hadn't been seen for over a century. More importantly, it reduced the standard weight of the as to a half ounce (the semuncial standard).This law is attested by Pliny, who says that "mox lege Papiria semunciarii asses facti" (soon by the Papirian Law asses were made semuncial). What is most interesting is that this law is attested on the first coins struck under its terms. Sestertii bear the letters E.L.P. for "e lege Papiria" (by the Papirian Law) and bronzes have the formula L.P.D.A.P. for "lege Papiria de assis pondere.
RR72069. Bronze as, Crawford 338/1, Sydenham 678, BMCRR I Rome 2188, RBW Collection 1236, SRCV I 739, F, centered, rough, weight 13.996 g, maximum diameter 29.3 mm, die axis 225o, Rome mint, c. 91 B.C.; obverse laureate and bearded head of Janus, I (mark of value) above; reverse prow right, L.P.D.A.P. (Lex Papiria de assis pondere) above, I (mark of value) above, ROMA in ex; from a Floridian Collector, ex Andrew McCabe Collection, ex RBW Collection (2009); scarce; $80.00 (€69.60)


Berytus, Phoenicia, 114 - 117 A.D.

Click for a larger photo While playing the flute Athena saw her reflection in water, and disturbed by how her cheeks looked, puffed up while playing, threw away the instrument in disgust. The satyr Marsyas picked up the flute and since it had once been inspired by the breath of a goddess, it played beautifully on its own accord. Elated by his success, Marsyas challenged Apollo to a musical contest. For the prize, the victor could do what he pleased with the vanquished. The Muses were the umpires. Apollo played the cithara and Marsyas the flute. Only after Apollo added his voice to the music of his lyre was the contest decided in his favor. As a just punishment for the presumption of Marsyas, Apollo bound him to a tree and flayed him alive. His blood was the source of the river Marsyas, and Apollo hung up his skin, like a wine bag, in the cave out of which that river flows.GB73087. Bronze AE 12, Sawaya 786 ff.; SNG Cop 89; BMC Phoenicia p. 56, 1 ff.; RPC I -, VF, weight 1.892 g, maximum diameter 12.3 mm, die axis 180o, Berytus (Beirut, Lebanon) mint, 114 - 117 A.D.; obverse Marsyas advancing left, carrying wine skin over shoulder, CO-L divided across field; reverse forepart of galley right, BER above; $80.00 (€69.60)


Roman Republic, Anonymous Luceria, 211 - 206 B.C.

Click for a larger photo In 321 B.C., the Roman army was deceived into thinking Luceria was under siege by the Samnites. Hurrying to relieve their allies the army walked into an ambush and were defeated at the famous Battle of the Caudine Forks. The Samnites occupied Luceria but were thrown out after a revolt. The city sought Roman protection and in 320 B.C. was granted the status of Colonia Togata, which meant it was ruled by the Roman Senate. In order to strengthen the ties between the two cities, 2,500 Romans moved to Luceria. From then on, Luceria was known as a steadfast supporter of Rome.RR68176. Bronze uncia, Crawford 97/7c, Sydenham 304, BMCRR Italy 173, 169, SRCV I 1320,, F, some corrosion, weight 5.081 g, maximum diameter 19.7 mm, die axis 90o, Luceria mint, 211 - 206 B.C.; obverse helmeted head of Roma right, pellet (mark of value) behind; reverse ROMA, galley prow right, ROMA above, L and pellet (mark of value) below; $75.00 (€65.25)


Roman Republic, L. Sempronius Pitio, 148 B.C.

Click for a larger photo In Roman mythology, Janus (or Ianus) was the god of gates, doors, doorways, and of beginnings and endings. Janus is believed to be one of the few major deities in Roman mythology that does not have a Greek origin or counterpart. RR69279. Copper as, SRCV I 726, Sydenham 403, Crawford 216/2, BMCRR Rome 718, F, porous, large flan flaw (pit) on reverse, weight 26.659 g, maximum diameter 31.3 mm, die axis 270o, Rome mint, 148 B.C.; obverse laureate head of bearded Janus, ΠI−TIO divided by I (mark of value) above; reverse galley prow right, L SEMP (MP ligate) above, I (mark of value) right, ROMA below; from the Andrew McCabe Collection; $75.00 (€65.25)


Roman Republic, C. Junius C.f., 149 B.C.

Click for a larger photo In Roman mythology, Janus (or Ianus) was the god of gates, doors, doorways, and of beginnings and endings. Janus is believed to be one of the few major deities in Roman mythology that does not have a Greek origin or counterpart. RR69287. Bronze as, Crawford 210/2, Sydenham 393, BMCRR Rome 664, SRCV I 723, F, weight 18.492 g, maximum diameter 29.8 mm, die axis 225o, Rome mint, 149 B.C.; obverse laureate head of bearded Janus, I (mark of value) above; reverse galley prow right, C•IVNI above, I (mark of value) right, ROMA below; from the Andrew McCabe Collection; $75.00 (€65.25)


Roman Republic, Anonymous (Roma Monogram), 212 - 205 B.C.

Click for a larger photo The southern mints were closed after 204 B.C., once Hannibal quit Italy.RR69326. Bronze quadrans, BMCRR Italy 195 (same dies), Crawford 84/6, Sydenham 190B, SRCV I -, aVF, weight 11.703 g, maximum diameter 23.2 mm, die axis 90o, southeast Italy mint, 212 - 205 B.C.; obverse head of Hercules right, clad in Nemean Lion's scalp, three pellets (mark of value) behind; reverse galley prow right, ROMA above, ROMA monogram before prow, three pellets (mark of value) below; from the Andrew McCabe Collection; rare; $75.00 (€65.25)


Roman Republic, OPEI (Q. Opeimius?), 169 - 157 B.C.

Click for a larger photo In Roman mythology, Janus (or Ianus) was the god of gates, doors, doorways, and of beginnings and endings. Janus is believed to be one of the few major deities in Roman mythology that does not have a Greek origin or counterpart. RR69345. Copper as, Sydenham 363, Crawford 190/1, BMCRR Rome 598, SRCV I 701, aVF, nice green patina, weight 23.810 g, maximum diameter 33.5 mm, die axis 315o, Rome mint, 169 - 157 B.C.; obverse laureate head of bearded Janus, I (mark of value) above; reverse galley prow right, OPEI above, I (mark of value) right, ROMA below; from the Andrew McCabe Collection; $75.00 (€65.25)


Roman Republic, M. Caecilius Q.f. Metellus, 127 B.C.

Click for a larger photo This type was issued both with and without the moneyer's name inscribed on the side of the prow. It isn't clear if the moneyer's name was ever present on this coin. RR69361. Bronze semis, Crawford 263/3a (moneyer's name on prow) or 263/3b (no name), Sydenham 482, BMCRE Rome 1151 (with name), SRCV I 881, F, weight 5.660 g, maximum diameter 22.0 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 127 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Saturn right, S (mark of value) behind; reverse prow right, Macedonian shield above, S (mark of value) right, ROMA below, [METELLVS on prow] (or similar, or omitted); from the Andrew McCabe Collection; $75.00 (€65.25)


Roman Republic, L. Cornelius Cinna, 169 - 157 B.C.

Click for a larger photo On 22 June 168 B.C., at the Battle of Pydna (in southern Macedonia) Roman forces under Lucius Aemilius Paulus decisively defeated Perseus and his Macedonian forces, ending the Third Macedonian War. Perseus was captured spent the rest of his life in captivity at Alba Fucens, near Rome. The Macedonian Kingdom was broken up into four smaller states. All the Greek cities which offered aid to Macedonia, even just in words, were punished. Rome took hundreds of prisoners from the leading families of Macedonia, including the historian Polybius.RR72169. Bronze as, Crawford 178/1, Sydenham 368, BMCRR I Rome 804, SRCV I 699, aF, weight 32.645 g, maximum diameter 31.4 mm, die axis 90o, Rome mint, 169 - 157 B.C.; obverse laureate bearded head of Janus, I (mark of value) above; reverse galley prow right, CINA above, I (mark of value) right, ROMA below; $75.00 (€65.25)


Berytus, Phoenicia, 114 - 117 A.D.

Click for a larger photo While playing the flute Athena saw her reflection in water, and disturbed by how her cheeks looked, puffed up while playing, threw away the instrument in disgust. The satyr Marsyas picked up the flute and since it had once been inspired by the breath of a goddess, it played beautifully on its own accord. Elated by his success, Marsyas challenged Apollo to a musical contest. For the prize, the victor could do what he pleased with the vanquished. The Muses were the umpires. Apollo played the cithara and Marsyas the flute. Only after Apollo added his voice to the music of his lyre was the contest decided in his favor. As a just punishment for the presumption of Marsyas, Apollo bound him to a tree and flayed him alive. His blood was the source of the river Marsyas, and Apollo hung up his skin, like a wine bag, in the cave out of which that river flows.GB73439. Bronze AE 11, Sawaya 786 ff.; SNG Cop 89; BMC Phoenicia p. 56, 1 ff.; RPC I -, VF, weight 0.830 g, maximum diameter 11.3 mm, Berytus (Beirut, Lebanon) mint, 114 - 117 A.D.; obverse Marsyas advancing left, carrying wine skin over shoulder, CO-L divided across field; reverse forepart of galley right, BER above; $75.00 (€65.25)


Constans, 9 September 337 - 19 January 350 A.D.

Click for a larger photo This type, with the emperor holding a Victory on Globe, is only listed as an AE 3 (17-19 mm diameter).RL57035. Bronze AE 2, Unpublished(?); cf. RIC VIII Thessalonica 122, LRBC 1649 (AE 3), VF, a little rough, weight 4.384 g, maximum diameter 22.9 mm, die axis 0o, Thessalonica mint, 348 - 350 A.D.; obverse D N CONSTA-NS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right, A behind; reverse FEL TEMP REPARATIO, Constans standing left on galley, Victory on globe in right hand, labarum (chi rho Christogram standard) in left, Victory seated in stern steering ship, A in left field, TSA in ex; $70.00 (€60.90)


Roman Republic, Anonymous, c. 90 B.C.

Click for a larger photo In 91 B.C., the tribune Marcus Livius Drusus proposed extending Roman citizenship to allied Italian cities, but was assassinated, leading to the Social War.RR71963. Bronze semis, Crawford 339/2, Sydenham 679a, BMCRR 2196, SRCV I 901, F, nice green patina, edge flaw, scratches, weight 6.921 g, maximum diameter 25.3 mm, die axis 45o, Rome mint, c. 90 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Saturn right, S (mark of value) behind; reverse prow right, S (mark of value) above, ROMA below; from the Andrew McCabe collection, ex Roma Numismatics e-auction 10, lot 527; $70.00 (€60.90)


Roman Republic, Imitative(?), c. 150 - 80 B.C.

Click for a larger photo The style is unusual, the symbol before the prow is obscure, and the weight is light for earlier types that seem most similar. This coin is likely an imitative.RR69093. Bronze quadrans, cf. Crawford 87/4 (V before prow), VF, well centered on a tight flan, weight 4.409 g, maximum diameter 20.9 mm, die axis 225o, Unofficial(?) mint, c. 150 - 80 B.C.; obverse head of Hercules right clad in Nemean Lion scalp, three pellets behind; reverse prow of galley right, ROMA above, uncertain symbol (dolphin?) or letter (V?) right, three pellets below; rare; $65.00 (€56.55)


Roman Republic, L Memmius Galeria, 106 B.C.

Click for a larger photo A very unusual design, with the value mark above the moneyers name on the reverse.RR69096. Bronze quadrans, Crawford 313/4, Sydenham 575b (R6), BMCRR I Rome 1359, SRCV I 1189, F, weight 6.328 g, maximum diameter 18.3 mm, die axis 270o, Rome mint, 106 B.C.; obverse head of Hercules right clad in Nemean Lion scalp headdress, three pellets behind; reverse prow right, three pellets over L MEMMI (ME ligate) above, Venus figurehead on prow, Cupid on right facing left crowning head of Venus, ROMA below; from the Andrew McCabe Collection; rare; $65.00 (€56.55)


Roman Republic, L PL H (L. Plautius Hypsaeus?), 194 - 189 B.C.

Click for a larger photo As noted by Sydenham, the reading of the monogram is uncertain and Mommsen's suggestion, L. Plautius Hypsaeus, is purely conjectural.RR69350. Bronze as, Crawford 134/2 (same dies); BMCRR Rome 555 (same dies); Sydenham 333; SRCV I 668, F, weight 28.997 g, maximum diameter 36.6 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 194 - 189 B.C.; obverse laureate and bearded head of Janus, I (mark of value) above; reverse galley prow right, LPLH monogram above, I (mark of value) before, ROMA in ex; from the Andrew McCabe Collection, large 36.6 mm bronze!; scarce; $65.00 (€56.55)


Roman Republic, C. Scribonius, 154 B.C.

Click for a larger photo In 154 B.C., The Lusitanians harassed the inhabitants of the Roman provinces in Hispania. At the same time, the Celtiberians of Numantia on the Douro revolted against their Roman occupation.RR69276. Bronze as, Crawford 201/2, Sydenham 381, BMCRR Rome 733, SRCV I 718, F, weight 16.341 g, maximum diameter 31.2 mm, die axis 135o, Rome mint, 154 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Janus, I (mark of value) above; reverse prow right, C·SCR above, I (mark of value) before, ROMA below; from the Andrew McCabe Collection; $60.00 (€52.20)


Roman Republic, M. Atilius Serranus, 148 B.C.

Click for a larger photo In Roman mythology, Janus (or Ianus) was the god of gates, doors, doorways, and of beginnings and endings. Janus is believed to be one of the few major deities in Roman mythology that does not have a Greek origin or counterpart. RR69277. Bronze as, Crawford 214/2, Sydenham 399, BMCRR Rome 692, SRCV I 727, aF, weight 23.625 g, maximum diameter 30.8 mm, die axis 90o, Rome mint, 148 B.C.; obverse laureate head of bearded Janus, I (mark of value) above; reverse prow right, M ATILI above, I (mark of value) right, ROMA below; from the Andrew McCabe Collection; scarce; $60.00 (€52.20)


Roman Republic, C. Licinius L.f. Macer, 84 B.C.

Click for a larger photo Odysseus, Ulysses to the Romans, was a legendary Greek king of Ithaca and a hero of Homer's epic poem the Odyssey. Odysseus also plays a key role in Homer's Iliad and other works in that same Epic Cycle. Odysseus is most famous for the ten eventful years he took to return home after his famous Trojan Horse ploy and the capture the city of Troy.RR69329. Bronze as, Crawford 354/3a, Sydenham 734, SRCV I 756, F, weight 12.361 g, maximum diameter 27.6 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 84 B.C.; obverse laureate head of bearded Janus, I (mark of value) above; reverse galley prow right, male figure standing facing on deck, long staff vertical in right hand, figure dividing EX - S C across field; from the Andrew McCabe Collection; $60.00 (€52.20)


Roman Republic, Q. Titius, 90 B.C.

Click for a larger photo The moneyer Q. Titi is known only from his coinage.RR69355. Bronze as, Crawford 341/4a; Sydenham 694, BMCRR Rome 2231, SRCV I 742, F, corrosion, weight 16.282 g, maximum diameter 27.4 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 90 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Janus with long pointed beard; reverse prow of galley right, Q TITI above, no control symbol; from the Andrew McCabe Collection; $60.00 (€52.20)


Roman Republic, Anonymous Luceria, c. 206 - 195 B.C.

Click for a larger photo In 321 B.C., the Roman army was deceived into thinking Luceria was under siege by the Samnites. Hurrying to relieve their allies the army walked into an ambush and were defeated at the famous Battle of the Caudine Forks. The Samnites occupied Luceria but were thrown out after a revolt. The city sought Roman protection and in 320 B.C. was granted the status of Colonia Togata, which meant it was ruled by the Roman Senate. In order to strengthen the ties between the two cities, 2,500 Romans moved to Luceria. From then on, Luceria was known as a steadfast supporter of Rome.RR69343. Copper Sextans, Crawford 97/20a or 97/27 (same types), Sydenham 128 (R4), SRCV I 1224, F, scrape and scratches, weight 4.992 g, maximum diameter 21.4 mm, die axis 270o, Luceria mint, c. 206 - 195 B.C.; obverse head of Mercury right in winged petasus, two pellets above, L below; reverse prow of galley right, ROMA above, two pellets below; from the Andrew McCabe Collection; scarce; $55.00 (€47.85)


Roman Republic, L. Saufeius, 152 B.C.

Click for a larger photo Saturn was an ancient Roman god of fertility, especially of agriculture and usually carries a sickle as his symbol. Saturday is named for Saturn. Romans celebrated the Feast of Saturnalia at the Winter Solstice. Homes were decorated with greenery. Friends visited and exchanged gifts. Slaves and masters ate at the same table. War and executions were postponed. Aspects of Saturnalia survive today in Christmas celebrations and carnival festivals around the world. RR69359. Bronze semis, Crawford 204/3, Sydenham 385a, BMCRR Rome 839, SRCV I 853, aVF, porous, weight 7.088 g, maximum diameter 22.6 mm, die axis 45o, Rome mint, 152 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Saturn right, S (mark of value) behind; reverse galley prow right, hull ornamented with apotropaic eye, crescent over L SAVF (VF ligate) above, S (mark of value) on right, ROMA below; from the Andrew McCabe Collection; $55.00 (€47.85)




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REFERENCES

Schaaff, Ulrich. Münzen der römischen Kaiserzeit mit Schiffsdarstellungen im Römisch-Germanischen Zentralmuseum. (Munich, 2003).

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