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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Roman Coins| ▸ |Roman Mints| ▸ |Emesa||View Options:  |  |  |   

Emesa, Syria

Emesa, an important city of Syria rose even further under Septimius Severus since his wife Julia Doman originated from this city. The bulk of the coinage consists in denarii struck for the above couple (193 - 211), plus the very rare issues of the usurper Uranius Antoninus (253 - 254). The extremely rare coinage of queen Zenobia (272) might have been struck at Emesa as well.

Julia Domna, Augusta 194 - 8 April 217 A.D.

|Julia| |Domna|, |Julia| |Domna,| |Augusta| |194| |-| |8| |April| |217| |A.D.|, |denarius|
Julia Domna was born in Emesa (now Homs), Syria in 170 A.D. She was the youngest daughter of high-priest Julius Bassianus, a descendant of the Royal House of Emesa. Emesa was famous for its Temple of the Sun, the center of worship for the ancient pagan cult El-Gebal (or Elagabal). El-Gebal, worshiped in the form of a conical black stone, was the Aramaic name for the Syrian Sun God and means God of the Mountain. Emesa was also the birthplace of three other Roman empresses, Julia Maesa, Julia Mamaea and Julia Soaemias, and one emperor, Julia Domna's nephew, Elagabalus.
SH32678. Silver denarius, unpublished in major references, RSC III -, RIC IV -, BMCRE V -, SRCV II -, EF, weight 3.004 g, maximum diameter 18.4 mm, die axis 0o, Emesa (Homs, Syria) mint, obverse IVLIA DOMNA AVG, draped bust right; reverse FORT AVG, Fortuna seated left on throne without back, rudder in right hand, cornucopia in left hand; extremely rare; SOLD


Julia Domna, Augusta 194 - 8 April 217 A.D.

|Julia| |Domna|, |Julia| |Domna,| |Augusta| |194| |-| |8| |April| |217| |A.D.|, |denarius|
Julia Domna was born in Emesa (now Homs), Syria in 170 A.D. She was the youngest daughter of high-priest Julius Bassianus, a descendant of the Royal House of Emesa. Emesa was famous for its Temple of the Sun, the center of worship for the ancient pagan cult El-Gebal (or Elagabal). El-Gebal, worshiped in the form of a conical black stone, was the Aramaic name for the Syrian Sun God and means God of the Mountain. Emesa was also the birthplace of three other Roman empresses, Julia Maesa, Julia Mamaea and Julia Soaemias, and one emperor, Julia Domna's nephew, Elagabalus.
SH32680. Silver denarius, unpublished in major references, RSC III -, RIC IV -, BMCRE V -, SRCV II -, VF, weight 2.942 g, maximum diameter 18.9 mm, die axis 45o, Emesa (Homs, Syria) mint, obverse IVLA DOMNA AVG (sic), draped bust right; reverse MONETA AVG, Moneta seated left on throne without back, polos or kalathos on head, scales in right hand, cornucopia in left; extremely rare; SOLD


Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D.

|Septimius| |Severus|, |Septimius| |Severus,| |9| |April| |193| |-| |4| |February| |211| |A.D.|, |denarius|
Victory or Nike is seen with wings in most statues and paintings, with one of the most famous being the Winged Victory of Samothrace. Most other winged deities in the Greek pantheon had shed their wings by Classical times. Nike is the goddess of strength, speed, and victory. Nike was a very close acquaintance of Athena and is thought to have stood in Athena's outstretched hand in the statue of Athena located in the Parthenon. Victory or Nike is also one of the most commonly portrayed figures on Greek and Roman coins.
RS92475. Silver denarius, RIC IV 423 (S) var. (...CAE L SEV...); RSC III 696 var. (same), BMCRE V p. 98, W393 var. (same, VICT AVG); SRCV II -; Hunter III -, EF, toned, minor encrustations, die wear, some letters unstruck, edge cracks, weight 3.188 g, maximum diameter 17.5 mm, die axis 0o, Emesa (Homs, Syria) mint, 194 - 195 A.D.; obverse IMP CAE SEP SEV PERT AVG COS II, laureate head right; reverse VICTOR AVG, Victory advancing right holding trophy in both hands; extremely rare, this is the only example of this variety known to FORVM; from the Errett Bishop Collection; SOLD


Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D.

|Septimius| |Severus|, |Septimius| |Severus,| |9| |April| |193| |-| |4| |February| |211| |A.D.|, |denarius|
Bonus Eventus, the god of good outcomes, was originally worshiped by the Romans as a deity especially presiding over agriculture and successful harvests. During the Imperial era, he was associated with other types of success. The epithet Bonus, "the Good," is used with other abstract deities such as Bona Fortuna ("Good Fortune"), Bona Mens ("Good Thinking" or "Sound Mind"), and Bona Spes ("Good Hope," perhaps to be translated as "optimism"), as well as with the mysterious and multivalent Bona Dea, a goddess whose rites were celebrated by women.
RS57075. Silver denarius, RIC IV 369 var., RSC III 68 var. (engraver's error: the obverse legend is lacking the L), gVF, weight 2.731 g, maximum diameter 19.6 mm, die axis 180o, Emesa (Homs, Syria) mint, 194 A.D.; obverse IMP CAE [L] SEP SEV PERT AVG COS II, laureate head right; reverse BONI EVENTVS, Bonus Eventus standing left, basket of fruit in right, two heads of grain in left; SOLD


Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D.

|Septimius| |Severus|, |Septimius| |Severus,| |9| |April| |193| |-| |4| |February| |211| |A.D.|, |denarius|
Bonus Eventus, the god of good outcomes, was originally worshiped by the Romans as a deity especially presiding over agriculture and successful harvests. During the Imperial era, he was associated with other types of success. The epithet Bonus, "the Good," is used with other abstract deities such as Bona Fortuna ("Good Fortune"), Bona Mens ("Good Thinking" or "Sound Mind"), and Bona Spes ("Good Hope," perhaps to be translated as "optimism"), as well as with the mysterious and multivalent Bona Dea, a goddess whose rites were celebrated by women.
RS68070. Silver denarius, RIC IV 369, RSC III 68, BMCRE V 343, SRCV II 6267, aEF, well centered, weight 3.081 g, maximum diameter 17.4 mm, die axis 180o, Emesa (Homs, Syria) mint, 194 A.D.; obverse IMP CAE L SEP SEV PERT AVG COS II, laureate head right; reverse BONI EVENTVS, Bonus Eventus standing left, basket of fruit in right, two heads of grain in left; SOLD


Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D.

|Septimius| |Severus|, |Septimius| |Severus,| |9| |April| |193| |-| |4| |February| |211| |A.D.|, |denarius|
Not listed in RIC or BMC!
RS11437. Silver denarius, RSC III 334a, RIC IV -, BMCRE V -, aEF, weight 3.140 g, maximum diameter 16.7 mm, die axis 180o, Emesa (Homs, Syria) mint, 193 - 194 A.D.; obverse IMP CAE L SEP SEV PERT AVG COS I, laureate head right; reverse MONET AVG, Moneta seated left holding scales and cornucopia; uncleaned, toned, well centered and struck; very rare; SOLD


Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D.

|Septimius| |Severus|, |Septimius| |Severus,| |9| |April| |193| |-| |4| |February| |211| |A.D.|, |denarius|
A very rare variant of the common Victory walking left on exergual line. We have found the type on Doug Smith's Septimius Emesa page, struck from the same reverse die. Mr. Smith notes: "I have not seen another specimen like this."
RS20843. Silver denarius, RIC IV 424 (S) var. (line vice globe); BMCRE V p. 98, W395 and pl. 17, 4 var. (same); RSC III 675a var. (same); Hunter III -, SRCV II -, VF, slightly irregular flan, reverse flatly struck, weight 2.054 g, maximum diameter 18.4 mm, die axis 180o, Emesa (Homs, Syria) mint, 194 A.D.; obverse IMP CAE L SEP SEV PERT AVG COS II, laureate head right; reverse VICT AVG (the victory of the Emperor), Victory standing left on globe, wreath in right and palm in left; extremely rare; SOLD


Julia Domna, Augusta 194 - 8 April 217 A.D.

|Julia| |Domna|, |Julia| |Domna,| |Augusta| |194| |-| |8| |April| |217| |A.D.|, |denarius|
Julia Domna was born in Emesa (now Homs), Syria in 170 A.D. She was the youngest daughter of high-priest Julius Bassianus, a descendant of the Royal House of Emesa. Emesa was famous for its Temple of the Sun, the center of worship for the ancient pagan cult El-Gebal (or Elagabal). El-Gebal, worshiped in the form of a conical black stone, was the Aramaic name for the Syrian Sun God and means God of the Mountain. Emesa was also the birthplace of three other Roman empresses, Julia Maesa, Julia Mamaea and Julia Soaemias, and one emperor, Julia Domna's nephew, Elagabalus.
SH47755. Silver denarius, RIC IV S627 var. (spelling), SRCV II 6591 var. (same), VF, weight 2.628 g, maximum diameter 17.4 mm, die axis 0o, Emesa (Homs, Syria) mint, 194 - 195 A.D.; obverse IVLA (sic) DOMNA AVG, draped bust right; reverse LIBERAL AVG, Liberalitas standing slightly left, polos or kalathos on head, counting board in right hand, cornucopia in left hand; rare; SOLD


Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D.

|Septimius| |Severus|, |Septimius| |Severus,| |9| |April| |193| |-| |4| |February| |211| |A.D.|, |denarius|
The crescent with horns up may represent a solar eclipse.
RS90424. Silver denarius, RIC IV 417, RSC III 628a, BMCRE V 390 - 391, VF, well centered, obverse legends weak, die wear, weight 2.451 g, maximum diameter 17.9 mm, die axis 0o, Emesa (Homs, Syria) mint, 194 - 195 A.D.; obverse IMP CAE L SEP SEV PERT AVG COS II, laureate head right; reverse SAECVL FELICIT (age of good fortune), seven stars above and within a crescent with horns up; scarce; SOLD


Julia Domna, Augusta, 194 - 8 April 217 A.D.

|Julia| |Domna|, |Julia| |Domna,| |Augusta,| |194| |-| |8| |April| |217| |A.D.|, |denarius|
Julia Domna was born in Emesa (now Homs), Syria in 170 A.D. She was the youngest daughter of high-priest Julius Bassianus, a descendant of the Royal House of Emesa. Emesa was famous for its Temple of the Sun, the center of worship for the ancient pagan cult El-Gebal (or Elagabal). El-Gebal, worshiped in the form of a conical black stone, was the Aramaic name for the Syrian Sun God and means God of the Mountain. Emesa was also the birthplace of three other Roman empresses, Julia Maesa, Julia Mamaea and Julia Soaemias, and one emperor, Julia Domna's nephew, Elagabalus.
RS64529. Silver denarius, RIC IV S632; RSC III 194; BMCRE V p. 105, S423; Hunter III -; SRCV II -, Choice aVF, toned, weight 2.745 g, maximum diameter 18.4 mm, die axis 180o, Emesa (Homs, Syria) mint, 193 - 196 A.D.; obverse IVLIA DOMNA AVG, draped bust right, hair in waved horizontal ridges, bun at back of head; reverse VENERI VICTR, Venus standing right with back turned facing, nude to below the buttocks, resting left elbow on waiste high column, transverse palm frond in left hand, apple in extended right hand; scarce; SOLD




  




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