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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Roman Coins ▸ Roman Mints ▸ TreveriView Options:  |  |  |     

Treveri, Gallia Belgica (Trier, Germany)

Colonia Augusta Treverorum was the capitol of Roman Belgica and served as the capital of the Gallic Empire under the emperors Tetricus I and II from 271 to 274. Dates of operation: 294 - 395, 408 - 413 and c. 430. Mintmarks: SMTR, TR, TRE, TROB, TRPS.


Theodora, Augusta, 2nd Wife of Constantius I, Grandmother of Caesars and Emperors

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Pietas in traditional Latin usage expressed a complex, highly valued Roman virtue; a man or woman with pietas respected his or her responsibilities to the gods, family, other people and entities (such as the state), and understood his or her place in society with respect to others.
RL79459. Billon reduced centenionalis, SRCV V 17500 ff., Cohen VII 4, EF, superb portrait, excellent reverse detail, tight flan cutting off most of mintmark, porous, weight 1.702 g, maximum diameter 15.1 mm, die axis 0o, Treveri (Trier, Germany) mint, 337 - 340 A.D.; obverse FL MAX THEODORAE AVG, draped bust right, elaborate hairstyle, pearl necklace; reverse PIETAS ROMANA, Pietas standing facing, head right, holding infant at her breast, [...]TR[...] in exergue; $100.00 (€89.00)
 


Constantine the Great, Early 307 - 22 May 337 A.D.

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The reverse legend dedicates this coin to "the glory of the Army." Western mint GLORIA EXERCITVS issues are much less common than the Eastern mint issues.
RL79205. Billon reduced centenionalis, LRBC I 60, RIC VII Trier 537, SRCV IV 16335, Cohen VII 254, Choice EF, nearly as struck, mint luster, weight 2.135 g, maximum diameter 18.7 mm, die axis 0o, 1st officina, Treveri (Trier, Germany) mint, 332 - 333 A.D.; obverse CONSTANTINVS MAX AVG, laurel and rosette diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse GLORIA EXERCITVS (glory of the army), two soldiers standing facing, heads turned inward confronted, two standards in center between them, each holds a spear in outer hand and rests inner hand on grounded shield, TR•P in exergue; $95.00 (€84.55)
 


Constantine the Great, Early 307 - 22 May 337 A.D.

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RIC only lists this reverse with a laurel and rosette diademed bust.
RL79335. Billon reduced centenionalis, LRBC I 79, SRCV IV 16336, Cohen VII 254, RIC VII Trier 555 (R4) var. (laurel and rosette diadem), Choice EF, nice portrait, weight 2.582 g, maximum diameter 17.7 mm, die axis 180o, 1st officina, Treveri (Trier, Germany) mint, 333 - 334 A.D.; obverse CONSTANTINVS MAX AVG, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse GLORIA EXERCITVS (glory of the army), two soldiers standing facing, heads turned inward confronted, two standards in center between them, each holds a spear in outer hand and rests inner hand on grounded shield, TRP in exergue; very rare; $95.00 (€84.55)
 


St. Helena, Augusta, 8 November 324 - c. 330 A.D., Mother of Constantine the Great

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In 318, Emperor Constantine the Great renamed Drepana in Asia Minor, Helenopolis, after his mother Helena.
RL79456. Billon reduced centenionalis, RIC VIII Trier 63; LRBC I 112; SRCV V 17493; Voetter 7; Cohen VII 4; Hunter V p. 218, 2 var. (1st officina), EF, mint luster, tight flan, areas of slight porosity, weight 1.604 g, maximum diameter 15.0 mm, die axis 165o, 2nd officina, Treveri (Trier, Germany) mint, 337 - 340 A.D.; obverse FL IVL HE-LENA AVG, diademed and mantled bust right wearing necklace; reverse PAX PVBLICA, Pax standing left, olive branch pointed down in right hand, long scepter transverse in left hand, •TRS• in exergue; $95.00 (€84.55)
 


Gallic Empire, Postumus, Summer 260 - Spring 269 A.D.

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So successful was he in the task of restoring peace and security to the provinces under his direct control that the coins issued by Postumus were of better workmanship and higher precious metal content than coins issued by Gallienus; his control of the Spanish and British mining regions was presumably crucial in this regard, as was his employment of master minters who would have come into Gaul with Gallienus.
RA76754. Billon antoninianus, RSC IV 199a, Cunetio 2413 (968 spec.), RIC V 75, Schulzki AGK 45, Mairat 65, Elmer 336, Hunter IV 60, VF, well centered and struck, nice portrait, weight 3.694 g, maximum diameter 21.2 mm, die axis 45o, Treveri (Trier, Germany) mint, c. 263 - 265 A.D.; obverse IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse MONETA AVG, Moneta standing left, scales in right hand, cornucopia in left; ex Harlan J. Berk; $90.00 (€80.10)
 


City of Constantinople Commemorative, 330 - 331 A.D.

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On 11 May 330, Constantine I refounded Byzantium, renamed it Constantinopolis after himself, and moved the capital of the Roman Empire from Rome to his new city. The new capital was Christian, old gods and traditions were either replaced or assimilated into a framework of Christian symbolism. Constantine built the new Church of the Holy Apostles on the site of a temple to Aphrodite. Generations later there was the story that a divine vision led Constantine to this spot. The capital would often be compared to the 'old' Rome as Nova Roma Constantinopolitana, the "New Rome of Constantinople." Special commemorative coins were issued with types for both Rome and Constantinople to advertise the importance of the new capital.
RL79185. Billon reduced centenionalis, Hunter V 1 (also 1st officina), RIC VII Trier 530, LRBC I 59, SRCV IV 16444, Cohen VII 22, Choice EF, broad flan, weight 2.277 g, maximum diameter 18.1 mm, die axis 180o, 1st officina, Treveri (Trier, Germany) mint, 330 - 331 A.D.; obverse CONSTANTINOPOLIS, laureate and helmeted bust of Constantinopolis left, wearing imperial cloak, scepter over left shoulder; reverse Victory standing left, right foot on prow, scepter in right hand, resting left hand on grounded shield, TRP• in exergue; $90.00 (€80.10)
 


City of Constantinople Commemorative, 330 - 334 A.D.

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On 11 May 330, Constantine I refounded Byzantium, renamed it Constantinopolis after himself, and moved the capital of the Roman Empire from Rome to his new city. The new capital was Christian, old gods and traditions were either replaced or assimilated into a framework of Christian symbolism. Constantine built the new Church of the Holy Apostles on the site of a temple to Aphrodite. Generations later there was the story that a divine vision led Constantine to this spot. The capital would often be compared to the 'old' Rome as Nova Roma Constantinopolitana, the "New Rome of Constantinople." Special commemorative coins were issued with types for both Rome and Constantinople to advertise the importance of the new capital.
RL79186. Billon reduced centenionalis, cf. SRCV IV 16444 ff., Cohen VII 22, Choice EF, superb obverse, reverse struck with a worn die, weight 2.715 g, maximum diameter 17.7 mm, die axis 0o, 1st officina, Treveri (Trier, Germany) mint, 330 - 334 A.D.; obverse CONSTANTINOPOLIS, laureate and helmeted bust of Constantinopolis left, wearing imperial cloak, scepter over left shoulder; reverse Victory standing left, right foot on prow, scepter in right hand, resting left hand on grounded shield, [...]TRP[...] in exergue; $90.00 (€80.10)
 


Constantine the Great, Early 307 - 22 May 337 A.D.

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This mintmark variation is not listed for Constantine the Great in RIC VII.
RL79439. Billon reduced centenionalis, LRBC I 87, SRCV IV 16361, Cohen VII 250, RIC VII Trier 590 var. (•TRP•), Hunter V -, EF, sharp detail, tight flan, areas of porosity, weight 1.148 g, maximum diameter 16.5 mm, die axis 180o, 1st officina, Treveri (Trier, Germany) mint, 335 - 337 A.D.; obverse CONSTANTINVS MAX AVG, pearl and rosette diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse GLORIA EXERCITVS (glory of the army), two soldiers standing facing, flanking a standard in center, heads confronted, each holds a spear in outer hand and rests inner hand on grounded shield, TRP in exergue; very rare; $90.00 (€80.10)
 


St. Helena, Augusta, 8 November 324 - c. 330 A.D., Mother of Constantine the Great

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Jerusalem was still being rebuilt following the destruction caused by Emperor Hadrian. He had built a temple over the site of Jesus's tomb near Calvary, and renamed the city Aelia Capitolina. Accounts differ concerning whether the Temple was dedicated to Venus or Jupiter According to tradition, Helena ordered the temple torn down and, according to the legend that arose at the end of the 4th century, chose a site to begin excavating, which led to the recovery of three different crosses. The legend is recounted in Ambrose, On the Death of Theodosius (died 395) and at length in Rufinus' chapters appended to his translation into Latin of Eusebius' Ecclesiastical History, the main body of which does not mention the event. Then, Rufinus relates, the empress refused to be swayed by anything short of solid proof and performed a test. Possibly through Bishop Macarius of Jerusalem, she had a woman who was near death brought from the city. When the woman touched the first and second crosses, her condition did not change, but when she touched the third and final cross she suddenly recovered, and Helena declared the cross with which the woman had been touched to be the True Cross. On the site of discovery, Constantine ordered the building of the Church of the Holy Sepulchre; churches were also built on other sites detected by Helena. Sozomen and Theodoret claim that Helena also found the nails of the crucifixion. To use their miraculous power to aid her son, Helena allegedly had one placed in Constantine's helmet, and another in the bridle of his horse.
RL79446. Billon reduced centenionalis, SRCV V 17500 ff. (various mintmarks), EF, mint luster, light marks, tight flan, weight 1.409 g, maximum diameter 15.7 mm, die axis 0o, 1st officina, Treveri (Trier, Germany) mint, 337 - 340 A.D.; obverse FL IVL HELENA AVGVSTA, diademed and mantled bust right wearing necklace; reverse PAX PVBLICA, Pax standing left, olive branch pointed down in right hand, long scepter transverse in left hand, cross lower left, TRP or similar (off flan) in exergue; $90.00 (€80.10)
 


St. Helena, Augusta, 8 November 324 - c. 330 A.D., Mother of Constantine the Great

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Helena is a saint in the Eastern Orthodox, Oriental Orthodox and Roman Catholic churches and famed for her piety. Her feast day as a saint of the Orthodox Christian Church is celebrated with her son on May 21, the "Feast of the Holy Great Sovereigns Constantine and Helen, Equal to the Apostles." Her feast day in the Roman Catholic Church falls on August 18. Her feast day in the Coptic Orthodox Church is on 9 Pashons. Eusebius records the details of her pilgrimage to Palestine and other eastern provinces (though not her discovery of the True Cross). She is the patron saint of new discoveries.
RL79448. Billon reduced centenionalis, SRCV V 17500 ff. (various mintmarks), EF, sharp detail, glossy dark green patina, spots of porosity, both sides slightly off center, tiny edge crack, weight 1.637 g, maximum diameter 15.8 mm, die axis 0o, Treveri (Trier, Germany) mint, 337 - 340 A.D.; obverse FL HELENA AVGVSTA, diademed and mantled bust right wearing necklace; reverse PAX PVBLICA, Pax standing left, olive branch pointed down in right hand, long scepter transverse in left hand, [...]TR[...] in exergue; $90.00 (€80.10)
 


St. Helena, Augusta, 8 November 324 - c. 330 A.D., Mother of Constantine the Great

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Helena gave birth to the future emperor Constantine I on 27 February of an uncertain year soon after 270 (probably around 272). At the time, she was in Naissus (Nis, Serbia). In order to obtain a wife more consonant with his rising status, Constantius divorced Helena some time before 289, when he married Theodora, Maximian's daughter under his command. (The narrative sources date the marriage to 293, but the Latin panegyric of 289 refers to the couple as already married). Helena and her son were dispatched to the court of Diocletian at Nicomedia, where Constantine grew to be a member of the inner circle. Helena never remarried and lived for a time in obscurity, though close to her only son, who had a deep regard and affection for her.
RL79451. Billon reduced centenionalis, Hunter V p. 281, 2 (also 1st officina); RIC VIII Trier 63; LRBC I 112; SRCV V 17493; Cohen VII 4, Choice EF, well centered on a slightly tight flan, sharp detail, some luster, slightly rough in areas (die rust?), weight 1.647 g, maximum diameter 14.9 mm, die axis 0o, 1st officina, Treveri (Trier, Germany) mint, 337 - 340 A.D.; obverse FL HELENA AVGVSTA, diademed and mantled bust right wearing necklace; reverse PAX PVBLICA, Pax standing left, olive branch pointed down in right hand, long scepter transverse in left hand, •TRP• in exergue; $90.00 (€80.10)
 


St. Helena, Augusta, 8 November 324 - c. 330 A.D., Mother of Constantine the Great

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In the 12th century Henry of Huntingdon included a passage in his Historia Anglorum that Constantine's mother Helena was a Briton, the daughter of King Cole of Colchester. Geoffrey of Monmouth expanded this story in his highly fictionalized Historia Regum Britanniae, an account of the supposed Kings of Britain from their Trojan origins to the Anglo-Saxon invasion. According to Geoffrey, Cole was King of the Britons when Constantius, here a senator, came to Britain. Afraid of the Romans, Cole submitted to Roman law so long as he retained his kingship. However, he died only a month later, and Constantius took the throne himself, marrying Cole's daughter Helena. They had their son Constantine, who succeeded his father as King of Britain before becoming Roman Emperor. Historically, this series of events is extremely improbable. Constantius had already left Helena by the time he left for Britain. Additionally, no earlier source mentions that Helena was born in Britain, let alone that she was a princess.
RL79452. Billon reduced centenionalis, SRCV V 17500 ff. (various mintmarks), EF, nice sharp portrait, attractive glossy green patina, tight flan, edge cracks, areas of slight porosity, weight 1.271 g, maximum diameter 15.0 mm, die axis 180o, Treveri (Trier, Germany) mint, 337 - 340 A.D.; obverse FL HELENA AVGVSTA, diademed and mantled bust right wearing necklace; reverse PAX PVBLICA, Pax standing left, olive branch pointed down in right hand, long scepter transverse in left hand, [...]TR[...] in exergue; $90.00 (€80.10)
 


St. Helena, Augusta, 8 November 324 - c. 330 A.D., Mother of Constantine the Great

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Helena died around 330, with her son at her side. She was buried in the Mausoleum of Helena, outside Rome on the Via Labicana. Her sarcophagus is on display in the Pio-Clementine Vatican Museum, although the connection is often questioned. Next to her is the sarcophagus of her granddaughter Saint Constantina (Saint Constance). Her skull is displayed in the Cathedral of Trier, in Germany.
RL79455. Billon reduced centenionalis, Hunter V p. 281, 2 (also 1st officina); RIC VIII Trier 63; LRBC I 112; SRCV V 17493; Cohen VII 4, EF, well struck and centered on a ragged flan, end of reverse legend not fully struck, some light corrosion, weight 1.921 g, maximum diameter 16.0 mm, die axis 30o, 1st officina, Treveri (Trier, Germany) mint, 337 - 340 A.D.; obverse FL HELENA AVGVSTA, diademed and mantled bust right wearing necklace; reverse PAX PVBLICA, Pax standing left, olive branch pointed down in right hand, long scepter transverse in left hand, •TRP• in exergue; $90.00 (€80.10)
 


Theodora, Augusta, 2nd Wife of Constantius I, Grandmother of Caesars and Emperors

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Pietas in traditional Latin usage expressed a complex, highly valued Roman virtue; a man or woman with pietas respected his or her responsibilities to the gods, family, other people and entities (such as the state), and understood his or her place in society with respect to others.
RL79458. Billon reduced centenionalis, SRCV V 17501, Cohen VII 4, VF, attractive portrait, dark green patina, reverse struck with a worn die, areas of light corrosion, weight 1.693 g, maximum diameter 15.5 mm, die axis 180o, 1st officina, Treveri (Trier, Germany) mint, 337 - 340 A.D.; obverse FL MAX THEODORAE AVG, draped bust right, elaborate hairstyle, pearl necklace; reverse PIETAS ROMANA, Pietas standing facing, head right, holding infant at her breast, •TRP[...] in exergue; $90.00 (€80.10)
 


Constantine the Great, Early 307 - 22 May 337 A.D.

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In early in December 316, to ensure his loyalty, Licinius elevated Aurelius Valerius Valens, the dux limitis (duke of the frontier) in Dacia, to the rank of Augustus. According to Petrus Patricius, when Constantine learned of this, "The emperor made clear the extent of his rage by his facial expression and by the contortion of his body. Almost unable to speak, he said, 'We have not come to this present state of affairs, nor have we fought and triumphed from the ocean till where we have now arrived, just so that we should refuse to have our own brother-in-law as joint ruler because of his abominable behavior, and so that we should deny his close kinship, but accept that vile slave [Valens] with him into imperial college.'" The treaty between Constantine and Licinius was concluded at Serdica on 1 March, 317. Whether it was part of that agreement is unknown, but Licinius had Valens executed.
RL73468. Billon follis, RIC VII Trier 102, SRCV IV 16063, Cohen VII 525, Choice EF, sharp detail, well centered, attractive bust, mintmark weak, weight 3.636 g, maximum diameter 20.4 mm, die axis 225o, 2nd officina, Treveri (Trier, Germany) mint, 316 A.D.; obverse IMP CONSTANTINVS AVG, laureate and cuirassed bust right; reverse SOLI INVICTO COMITI, Sol standing slightly left, radiate, nude but for chlamys over shoulders and left arm, raising right hand commanding the sun to rise, globe in left hand, T - F flanking at sides, BTR in exergue; $85.00 (€75.65)
 


Gallic Empire, Postumus, Summer 260 - Spring 269 A.D.

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Moneta was a surname given to Juno because she was said to have promised the Romans that if they fought only just wars, they would never be in want of money.
RA77906. Billon antoninianus, RSC IV 199a, Cunetio 2413 (968 spec.), RIC V 75, Schulzki AGK 45, Mairat 65, Elmer 336, Hunter IV 60, SRCV III 10962, Choice gVF, toned, nice portrait, slightly ragged flan, weight 3.666 g, maximum diameter 22.4 mm, die axis 180o, Treveri (Trier, Germany) mint, c. 263 - 265 A.D.; obverse IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse MONETA AVG, Moneta standing left, scales in right hand, cornucopia in left; from the Butte College Foundation, ex Lindgren, ex CNG/Seaby; $85.00 (€75.65)
 


Constantine the Great, Early 307 - 22 May 337 A.D.

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In 331 A.D., Constantine I vigorously promoted Christianity, confiscating the property and valuables of a number of pagan temples throughout the Empire.
RL79166. Billon reduced centenionalis, RIC VII Trier 526 (S), LRBC I 54, SRCV IV 16334, Cohen VII 254, EF, mint luster, die wear, weight 2.540 g, maximum diameter 17.8 mm, die axis 180o, 1st officina, Treveri (Trier, Germany) mint, 330 - 331 A.D.; obverse CONSTANTINVS MAX AVG, rosette-diademed draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse GLORIA EXERCITVS (glory of the army), two soldiers standing facing, heads turned inward confronted, two standards in center between them, each holds a spear in outer hand and rests inner hand on grounded shield, TRP• in exergue; $80.00 (€71.20)
 


Constantine the Great, Early 307 - 22 May 337 A.D.

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The reverse legend dedicates this coin to "the glory of the Army." Western mint GLORIA EXERCITVS issues are much less common than the Eastern mint issues.
RL79200. Billon reduced centenionalis, RIC VII Trier 538 (R4), LRBC I 61, SRCV IV 16335, Cohen VII 254, Choice EF, nice portrait, well centered and struck, weight 2.124 g, maximum diameter 17.5 mm, die axis 180o, 1st officina, Treveri (Trier, Germany) mint, 332 - 333 A.D.; obverse CONSTANTINVS MAX AVG, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse GLORIA EXERCITVS (glory of the army), two soldiers standing facing, heads turned inward confronted, two standards in center between them, each holds a spear in outer hand and rests inner hand on grounded shield, TR•P in exergue; $80.00 (€71.20)
 


Constantine the Great, Early 307 - 22 May 337 A.D.

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The reverse legend dedicates this coin to "the glory of the Army." Western mint GLORIA EXERCITVS issues are much less common than the Eastern mint issues.
RL79201. Billon reduced centenionalis, LRBC I 60, RIC VII Trier 537, SRCV IV 16335, Cohen VII 254, Choice EF, well centered and struck, nice portrait, tiny edge crack, weight 2.058 g, maximum diameter 17.3 mm, die axis 0o, 2nd officina, Treveri (Trier, Germany) mint, 332 - 333 A.D.; obverse CONSTANTINVS MAX AVG, laurel and rosette diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse GLORIA EXERCITVS (glory of the army), two soldiers standing facing, heads turned inward confronted, two standards in center between them, each holds a spear in outer hand and rests inner hand on grounded shield, TR•S in exergue; $80.00 (€71.20)
 


Constantine the Great, Early 307 - 22 May 337 A.D.

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The reverse legend dedicates this coin to "the glory of the Army."
RL79207. Billon reduced centenionalis, LRBC I 60, RIC VII Trier 537, SRCV IV 16335, Cohen VII 254, Choice EF, glossy dark green patina, reverse slightly off center, weight 2.547 g, maximum diameter 18.1 mm, die axis 180o, 1st officina, Treveri (Trier, Germany) mint, 332 - 333 A.D.; obverse CONSTANTINVS MAX AVG, laurel and rosette diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse GLORIA EXERCITVS (glory of the army), two soldiers standing facing, heads turned inward confronted, two standards in center between them, each holds a spear in outer hand and rests inner hand on grounded shield, TR•P in exergue; $80.00 (€71.20)
 




    



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REFERENCES

Cahn, H.A. "Die Trierer Antoniniane der Tetrarchie" in SNR XXXVII (1955).
Schulte, P.N. Die Römische Münzstätte Trier von der Wiederaufnahme ihrer Tätigkeit unter Diocletian bis zum Ende der Folles-Prägung. (Frankfurt, 1974).
von Schrötter, F. Die Münzen von Trier. 2. Teil. (Bonn 1908).
Weiller, R. Die Münzen von trier, 1. Teil. (Düsseldorf, 1988).
Zschucke, C.-F. Die römische Münzstätte Trier. (Trier, 1988).

Catalog current as of Thursday, September 29, 2016.
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Treveri