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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Roman Coins ▸ Roman Mints ▸ LondiniumView Options:  |  |  |   

Londinium (London, England)

Londinium was established on the site of the City of London around 43 A.D. It was sacked in 60 A.D. by the Iceni led by queen Boudica, but quickly rebuilt. At the end of the 1st century, Londinium was a cosmopolitan community of merchants from across the Empire and the capital of Roman Britain. In 286, the usurper Carausius declared himself the Emperor of Britain. In 296, Rome invaded and reclaimed Britain from his successor Allectus. Twice British legions rebelled and elected their own emperors, Magnus Maximus in 382 and Constantine III, in 407. Both crossed the channel with their legions and were defeated, leaving Britain largely unprotected. As the Empire declined, Britain became increasingly isolated. In 410, the Romano-British authorities appealed to Honorius for help. He replied that the Britons would have to look after their own defenses, meaning Roman occupation of Britain had ended. Britain was increasingly vulnerable to attack by the Angles, Saxons, Jutes and Frisii. By the middle 5th century only a small number of wealthy families maintained a Roman lifestyle. At the end of the 5th century the city was largely an uninhabited ruin. Mint dates of operation: 287 - 325 and 383 - 388. Mintmarks: AVG, AVGOB, AVGPS, L, LD, LG, LI, LN, LON, LVG, LVGD, LVGPS, ML, MLL, MLN, MSL, PLN, PLON. Londinium was renamed Augusta about 325 A.D. Coins minted under Magnus Maximus, 383 - 387, use AVG mintmarks.Londinium


Romano-British Empire, Carausius, Mid 286 - Spring or Early Summer 293 A.D.

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Although references lists numerous varieties of Providentia reverses, this particular reverse, with rudder, PROVID AVG, and no mint marks is not listed in the references examined and we were unable to find another example online.

RIC notes that London issued coins without mint marks in 287 A.D. As this was the beginning of "British Empire" coinage, coins were often irregular and overstruck on older coins.
RA07649. Billon antoninianus, RIC V-2 -, Webb Carausius -, SRCV IV -, Hunter IV -, Cohen VII -, gVF, fine light green patina, and exotic "British" style, extremely rare, possibly unpublished or unique, weight 3.85 g, maximum diameter 24.8 mm, die axis 180o, Londinium (London, England) mint, c. mid 286 - early/mid 287; obverse IMP CARAVSIVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, early reign moustache portrait type; reverse PROVID AVG (the foresight of the Emperor), Providentia standing left, rudder in right hand, globe left of rudder, cornucopia in right hand; from the Scott Collection; SOLD


Constantine II, 22 May 337 - March or April 340 A.D.

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SH28377. Billon reduced follis, RIC VII London -, unlisted bust type, Choice aEF, weight 3.005 g, maximum diameter 19.3 mm, die axis 135o, 1st officina, Londinium (London, England) mint, as caesar, 323 - 324 A.D.; obverse CONSTANTINVS IVN N C, laureate and cuirassed bust left, Victory on globe in right hand; reverse BEATA TRA-NQLITAS, globe on altar inscribed VOT/IS / XX, three stars above, PLON in exergue; extremely rare; SOLD


Romano-British Empire, Carausius, Mid 286 - Spring or Early Summer 293 A.D.

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Pax, regarded by the ancients as a goddess, was worshiped not only at Rome but also at Athens. Her altar could not be stained with blood. Claudius began the construction of a magnificent temple to her honor, which Vespasian finished, in the Via Sacra. The attributes of Peace are the hasta pura, the olive branch, the cornucopia, and often the caduceus. Sometimes she is represented setting fire to a pile of arms.
RA04156. Billon antoninianus, RIC V-2 101 var., VF+, bold portrait, weight 2.92 g, maximum diameter 23.7 mm, die axis 0o, Londinium (London, England) mint, c. 288 A.D.; obverse IMP CARAVSIVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, middle reign portrait type; reverse PAX AVG (the peace of the Emperor), Pax standing left, raising olive branch in right hand, long scepter vertical in left hand, L left, ML in exergue; from the Aiello Collection; SOLD


Crispus, Caesar, 1 March 317 - 326 A.D.

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On 3 July 324, at Adrianople, Constantine defeated Licinius forcing him to retreat to Byzantium. Crispus destroyed Licinius' fleet at the Battle of Hellespont in the Dardanelles, allowing his father to cross over the Bosporus and besiege Licinius. On 18 September, Constantine I decisively defeated Licinius at the Battle of Chrysopolis and became sole emperor.
RL90695. Billon centenionalis, RIC VII London 279, Cohen VII 27, SRCV IV 16726, Choice EF, centered, interesting decoration on shield, traces of silvering, weight 3.008 g, maximum diameter 19.3 mm, die axis 135o, 1st officina, Londinium (London, England) mint, 323 - 324 A.D.; obverse CRISPVS NOBIL C, laureate and cuirassed bust left, holding spear and shield; reverse BEAT TRA-NQLITAS, globe on altar inscribed VOT/IS / XX in three lines, three stars above, PLON in exergue; scarce; SOLD


Crispus, Caesar, 1 March 317 - 326 A.D.

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In 323, Constantine the Great defeated invading Goths and Sarmatians north of the Danube in Dacia, and claimed the title Sarmaticus Maximus.
RL90704. Billon centenionalis, RIC VII Trier 372, SRCV IV 16731, Cohen VII 22, Choice EF, bold sharp strike, excellent detail, weight 4.037 g, maximum diameter 20.0 mm, die axis 180o, 2nd officina, Treveri (Trier, Germany) mint, 322 - 323 A.D.; obverse IVL CRISPVS NOB CAES, laureate and cuirassed bust left, spear over shoulder in right, shield on left shoulder; reverse BEATA TRAN-QVILLITAS, altar inscribed VO/TIS / XX in three lines, surmounted by globe, three stars above, ēSTRē in exergue; SOLD


Romano-British Empire, Carausius, Mid 286 - Spring or Early Summer 293 A.D.

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Legio VIII Augusta was created by Pompey. It fought the Gallic Wars for Caesar and crossed the Rubicon with him; however, at Thapsus it fought against him. The legion fought in Egypt and later participated in the invasion of Britain. In 69 A.D. it declared for Vitellius. Soon after, it moved to the Rhine frontier where they served for more than 400 years. An inscription from 371 A.D. recorded the legion was then stationed at Argentoratum (Strasbourg). There may have been a detachment serving in Britain at the time of Carausius' revolt. Septimius Severus used the legion in his Parthian war.
RA73239. Billon antoninianus, RIC V-2 77 (R2); Hunter IV 11; Webb Carausius 97 - 99; Cohen VII 145, F, green patina, slightly off center on a broad oval flan, earthen deposits, light marks, areas of light corrosion, weight 4.236 g, maximum diameter 24.7 mm, die axis 45o, Londinium (London, England) mint, 291 A.D.; obverse IMP C CARAVSIVS P F AVG, radiate and draped bust right; reverse LEG VIII AVG, bull standing right, ML in exergue (or blank); from the Charles Peters Carausius Collection; rare; SOLD


Romano-British Empire, Carausius, Mid 286 - Spring or Early Summer 293 A.D.

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Possibly unpublished with mint mark in legend on reverse instead of exergue. The use of ML and no field marks is assigned in RIC to 288-289. LM as a mint mark is unlisted entirely. RIC 27 does show an exergual mark of LM with L retrograde and field mark of V. It is also entirely possible this is an ancient imitative type in exceptional style.
RA34673. Billon antoninianus, RIC V-2 - (cf. 155 for reverse type), VF, weight 3.600 g, maximum diameter 22.5 mm, die axis 270o, unmarked unofficial(?) mint, c. 287 A.D.; obverse IMP CARAVSIVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse LM SALVS AVG (the health of the Emperor), Salus standing facing, head left, feeding snake coiled round altar at left from patera in right hand, vertical scepter in left; ex Beast Coins; rare; SOLD


Constantine II, 22 May 337 - March or April 340 A.D.

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SH49573. Billon centenionalis, FORVM 28377, RIC VII London -, unlisted bust type, Choice VF, weight 2.582 g, maximum diameter 19.9 mm, die axis 180o, 1st officina, Londinium (London, England) mint, as caesar, 323 - 324 A.D.; obverse CONSTANTINVS IVN N C, laureate and cuirassed bust left, Victory on globe in right hand; reverse BEATA TRANQLITAS (blessed tranquility), globe on altar inscribed VOT/IS / XX, three stars above, PLON in exergue; extremely rare; SOLD


Romano-British Empire, Carausius, Mid 286 - Spring or Early Summer 293 A.D.

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The system of mintmarks, widely used by all mints in the late Roman Empire, was introduced under the usurper Carausius, probably by his finance minister and successor, Allectus. Carausius coins without mintmarks are his earliest coins, probably struck at Londinium and Camulodunum before mid-287. Coins without mintmarks and with crude style or blundered legends are probably unofficial.
RT73219. Billon antoninianus, RIC V-2 884 (S), Webb Carausius 992, Hunter IV -; SRCV IV -, nice gVF, excellent portrait, attractive green patina, weight 4.394 g, maximum diameter 22.4 mm, die axis 225o, unmarked mint, c. mid 286 - mid 287 A.D.; obverse IMP C M CARAVSIVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, early reign moustache portrait type; reverse PAX AVG (the peace of the Emperor), Pax standing left, olive branch in right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, nothing in fields or exergue; from the Charles Peters Carausius Collection, ex Richard L. Horst (Colorado Springs, CO); scarce; SOLD


Romano-British Empire, Carausius, Mid 286 - Spring or Early Summer 293 A.D.

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Adventus reverse types commemorate the emperor's arrival, either at the commencement of his reign or on his return from a distance. For most emperors, this type refereed to an arrival at Rome. At their accession, emperors were not conveyed in a chariot nor in any other vehicle, but went on horseback or on foot when they made their first public entry into the capital of the Roman world. Of course this coin cannot refer to an arrival in Rome. It likely refers to Carausius arriving at Londinium.
RA73487. Billon antoninianus, RIC V-2 10 (R), Webb Carausius 17, Hunter IV 18, Askew 107, SRCV IV 13551, gF, green patina, tight flan cutting off parts of legends, minor edge flaking (stable), a little rough, weight 3.423 g, maximum diameter 19.6 mm, die axis 180o, Londinium (London, England) mint, 287 - 288 A.D.; obverse IMP CARAVSIVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse ADVENTVS AVG (arrival of the Emperor), emperor riding left, wearing military garb, raising right hand in salute, scepter in left hand, cloak flying behind, captive with hands bound behind seated left below horse's raised right foreleg, ML in exergue; from the Charles Peters Carausius Collection; SOLD




  




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Londinium