Coins and Antiquities Consignment Shop
  Welcome Guest. Please login or register. All items are guaranteed authentic for eternity! Please call us if you have questions 252-646-1958. Thanks for your business! Welcome Guest. Please login or register. Internet challenged? We are happy to take your order over the phone. Please call if you have questions 252-646-1958. Thanks for your business!

Catalog Main Menu
Fine Coins Showcase

Antiquities Showcase
Recent Additions
Recent Price Reductions

Show empty categories
Shop Search
Shopping Cart
Contact Us
About Forum
Shopping at Forum
Our Guarantee
Payment Options
Shipping Options & Fees
Privacy & Security
Forum Staff
Selling Your Coins
Identifying Your Coin
FAQs
Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Roman Coins ▸ Roman Mints ▸ LondiniumView Options:  |  |  |   

Londinium (London, England)

Londinium was established on the site of the City of London around 43 A.D. It was sacked in 60 A.D. by the Iceni led by queen Boudica, but quickly rebuilt. At the end of the 1st century, Londinium was a cosmopolitan community of merchants from across the Empire and the capital of Roman Britain. In 286, the usurper Carausius declared himself the Emperor of Britain. In 296, Rome invaded and reclaimed Britain from his successor Allectus. Twice British legions rebelled and elected their own emperors, Magnus Maximus in 382 and Constantine III, in 407. Both crossed the channel with their legions and were defeated, leaving Britain largely unprotected. As the Empire declined, Britain became increasingly isolated. In 410, the Romano-British authorities appealed to Honorius for help. He replied that the Britons would have to look after their own defenses, meaning Roman occupation of Britain had ended. Britain was increasingly vulnerable to attack by the Angles, Saxons, Jutes and Frisii. By the middle 5th century only a small number of wealthy families maintained a Roman lifestyle. At the end of the 5th century the city was largely an uninhabited ruin. Mint dates of operation: 287 - 325 and 383 - 388. Mintmarks: AVG, AVGOB, AVGPS, L, LD, LG, LI, LN, LON, LVG, LVGD, LVGPS, ML, MLL, MLN, MSL, PLN, PLON. Londinium was renamed Augusta about 325 A.D. Coins minted under Magnus Maximus, 383 - 387, use AVG mintmarks.Londinium


Romano-British Empire, Carausius, Mid 286 - Spring or Early Summer 293 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
References list numerous Carausius varieties with Pax reverse legends but depicting Salus and also types with Salus reverse legends but depicting Pax. The references provided for comparison list a PAX AVG, with Salus type, without controls or a mintmark; David Sear attributes to London, 286 - 287 A.D. References do not list our variety but other types with F - O across the field and ML in the exergue are attributed to London, c. 289 - 290 A.D. This is the only example of this variant known to Forum.
RA73904. Billon antoninianus, Apparently unpublished; cf. RIC V, part 2, 930 ff. (no mintmarks); Webb Carausius 1031 ff. (same); SRCV IV 13661 (same, London, 286 - 287), aVF, nice green patina, overstruck or double-struck, tight flan cutting off parts of legends and mintmark, weight 2.615 g, maximum diameter 20.3 mm, die axis 315o, Londinium(?) or unofficial(?) mint, 289 - 290 A.D.; obverse IMP CARAVS[IVS P AVG] (or similar), radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse PAX AVG[GG?], Salus standing half left, head left, feeding snake rising from altar at left from patera in her right hand, vertical scepter in left hand, [F?] - O flanking across the field, M[L?] in exergue; from the Charles Peters Carausius Collection; possibly unique!; $200.00 (178.00)


Romano-British Empire, Carausius, Mid 286 - Spring or Early Summer 293 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
The system of mintmarks, widely used by all mints in the late Roman Empire, was introduced under the usurper Carausius, probably by his finance minister and successor, Allectus. Carausius coins without mintmarks are his earliest coins, probably struck at Londinium and Camulodunum before mid-287. Coins without mintmarks and with crude style or blundered legends are probably unofficial.
RA73276. Billon antoninianus, Webb Carausius 1010; RIC V, ii, 905 var. (no cuirass); Cohen VII 209 var. (same); SRCV IV 13649 var. (transverse scepter); Hunter IV 72 var. (same), VF, attractive green patina, well centered, porous, light corrosion, weight 5.053 g, maximum diameter 22.1 mm, die axis 90o, Londinium (London, England) mint, c. mid 286 - mid 287; obverse IMP CARAVSIVS P F AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right, from the front; reverse PAX AVG (the peace of the Emperor), Pax standing left, olive branch in extended right hand, staff vertical behind in left hand, no mintmarks or controls; from the Charles Peters Carausius Collection; $165.00 (146.85)


Crispus, Caesar, 1 March 317 - 326 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Crispus' earliest issue. On 1 March 317, Constantine the Great and co-emperor Licinius elevated their sons Crispus, Constantine II (still an baby) and Licinius II to Caesars. After this arrangement Constantine ruled the dioceses Pannonia and Macedonia, and established his residence at Sirmium, from where he prepared a campaign against the Goths and Sarmatians.
RL76319. Billon reduced follis, RIC VII London 115 (R2), SRCV IV 16718, Cohen VII 136, Choice EF, excellent centering and strike, some die wear, weight 3.243 g, maximum diameter 20.1 mm, die axis 0o, 1st officina, Londinium (London, England) mint, 1st issue, 1 Mar - end 317 A.D.; obverse CRISPVS NOB CAES, laureate and cuirassed bust right; reverse SOLI INVICTO COMITI (to the unconquered Sun, minister [of the Emperor]), Sol standing left, radiate, nude but for chlamys over left shoulder, raising right hand commanding the sun to rise, globe in left hand, S - P across fields, PLN in exergue; scarce; $155.00 (137.95)


Romano-British Empire, Carausius, Mid 286 - Spring or Early Summer 293 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
"Legio IV Flavia Felix, reconstituted by Vespasian in AD 70 from the disgraced Legio IV Macedonica, had been stationed at Singidunum (Belgrade) in Moesia from the time of Hadrian. However, there may have been a detachment serving in Britain at the time of Carausius' revolt." -- Roman Coins and Thier Values by David R. Sear
RA73248. Billon antoninianus, cf. Carausius Webb 88; RIC V, part 2, 69 (R); Askew 146; SRCV IV 13611; Casey -, aVF, small ragged flan cutting off most of legends, pitting, scratches, weight 2.518 g, maximum diameter 19.4 mm, die axis 180o, Londinium (London, England) mint, 286 - 288 A.D.; obverse IMP [C?] CARAVSIVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse LEG IIII FL, lion walking right, ML in exergue; from the Charles Peters Carausius Collection; very rare; $150.00 (133.50)


Romano-British Empire, Carausius, Mid 286 - Spring or Early Summer 293 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
In The Reign and Coinage of Carausius, Percy Webb wrote that Providentia types are very common, but those reading PROVIDEN are rare.
RA73472. Billon antoninianus, Webb Carausius 175 (draped, no cuirass) or 176 (also cuirassed), RIC V 149 (S), SRCV IV 13694, Askew 182, Hunter IV -, VF, green patina, well centered on a tight flan, areas weakly struck, bumps and marks, weight 3.155 g, maximum diameter 22.8 mm, die axis 180o, 2nd officina, Londinium (London, England) mint, c. 290 - 291 A.D.; obverse IMP CARAVSIVS P F AVG, radiate, draped (and cuirassed?) bust right; reverse PROVIDENT AVG (the foresight of the Emperor), Providentia standing left, globe in right hand, long transverse scepter in left hand, B - E across fields, MLXXI in exergue; scarce; $150.00 (133.50)


Constantine the Great, Early 307 - 22 May 337 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
In 321, Constantine I assigned convicts to grind Rome's flour in a move to hold back the rising price of food in an empire whose population had shrunk as a result of plague.
RL76394. Billon centenionalis, RIC VII London 185 (R2), SRCV IV 16315, Cohen VII 690, Choice EF, attractive style, excellent strike, some silvering, weight 2.941 g, maximum diameter 19.4 mm, die axis 195o, 1st officina, Londinium (London, England) mint, 320 - 321 A.D.; obverse CONSTA-NTINVS AVG, helmeted and cuirassed bust right; reverse VIRTVS EXERCIT (courage of the army), vexillum inscribed VOT / XX in two lines, two captives seated at base facing outward, the one on the left with hand to face in attitude of mourning, the one on the right with hands bound behind and turned looking back left, PLON in exergue; from the Scott Collection; $145.00 (129.05)


Constantine II, 22 May 337 - March or April 340 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
In a religious context, votum, plural vota, is a vow or promise made to a deity. The word comes from the past participle of voveo, vovere; as the result of the verbal action "vow, promise", it may refer also to the fulfillment of this vow, that is, the thing promised. The votum is thus an aspect of the contractual nature of Roman religion, a bargaining expressed by do ut des, "I give that you might give."
RL76939. Billon reduced follis, RIC VII London 236, Cohen VII 8, SRCV V 17149 var. (helmeted bust), Hunter V -, Nice gVF, weight 3.109 g, maximum diameter 19.3 mm, Londinium (London, England) mint, as caesar, 321 - 322 A.D.; obverse CONSTANTINVS IVN N C, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust left; reverse BEATA TRANQVILLITAS (blessed tranquility), globe on altar inscribed VOT/IS / XX in three lines, three stars above, PLON in exergue; $140.00 (124.60)


Romano-British Empire, Carausius, Mid 286 - Spring or Early Summer 293 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
This variety is apparently unpublished but, based on the number of examples online, it is fairly common.
RA73242. Billon antoninianus, Webb Carausius 149; RIC V, part 2, 118; Hunter IV 54, Askew 163, Cohen VII 215; SRCV IV 13640, VF, excellent centering, nice green patina, light marks, small earthen deposits, weight 3.968 g, maximum diameter 23.3 mm, die axis 180o, Londinium (London, England) mint, 292 - early 293 A.D.; obverse IMP C CARAVSIVS P F AVG, radiate and cuirassed bust right; reverse PAX AVG (the peace of the Emperor), Pax standing slightly left, head left, raising olive branch in right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, S - P flanking at sides, MLXXI in exergue; from the Charles Peters Carausius Collection; $135.00 (120.15)


Romano-British Empire, Carausius, Mid 286 - Spring or Early Summer 293 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
The system of mintmarks, widely used by all mints in the late Roman Empire, was introduced under the usurper Carausius, probably by his finance minister and successor, Allectus. Carausius coins without mintmarks are his earliest coins, probably struck at Londinium and Camulodunum before mid-287. Coins without mintmarks and with crude style or blundered legends are probably unofficial.
RA73240. Billon antoninianus, RIC V, part 2, 895; Webb Carausius 996; Cohen VII 209; SRCV IV 13649; Hunter IV 71 corr. (says cuirassed, plate coin is not cuirassed), gVF, dark green patina, struck with crude dies, broad ragged flan, reverse double struck, weight 4.293 g, maximum diameter 27.8 mm, die axis 180o, Londinium (London, England) mint, c. mid 286 - mid 287; obverse IMP CARAVSIVS P F AVG, radiate and draped bust right, from the front; reverse PAX AVG (the peace of the Emperor), Pax standing left, olive branch in extended right hand, long scepter in transverse left hand, no mintmarks or controls; from the Charles Peters Carausius Collection; $125.00 (111.25)


Constantine the Great, Early 307 - 22 May 337 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
In Roman religion, every man has a genius, a presiding spirit. In De Die Natali, Censorinus says, from the moment we are born, we live under the guard and tutelage of Genius. Cities, organizations, and peoples also had a genius. On coins, we find inscriptions to the Genius of the Army, of the Senate, of the Emperor, etc. The legend GENIO POP ROM dedicates this coin to the Genius of the Roman People. Genius' image is of a man with a cloak half covering the shoulders leaving the rest of his body naked, holding a cornucopia in one hand, and a simpulum or a patera in the other.
RL79896. Billon follis, RIC VI Londinium 103 (S), Hunter V 1, SRCV IV 15911, Cohen VII 205, Choice VF, well centered, light corrosion, weight 6.837 g, maximum diameter 26.8 mm, die axis 180o, 1st officina, Londinium (London, England) mint, c. autumn 307 - early 310 A.D.; obverse IMP CONSTANTINVS P F AVG, laureate and cuirassed bust right, from the front; reverse GENIO POP ROM (to the guardian spirt of the Roman people), Genius standing left, kalathos on head, bare to the waist, himation around hips and legs and over left arm, patera in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, PLN in exergue; scarce; $120.00 (106.80)




  



CLICK HERE TO SEE MORE FROM THIS CATEGORY - FORVM's PRIOR SALES



Catalog current as of Tuesday, February 21, 2017.
Page created in 1.544 seconds
Londinium