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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Roman Coins| ▸ |Roman Mints| ▸ |Aquileia||View Options:  |  |  |   

Aquileia, Italy

Aquileia was founded by the Romans as a Latin colony in 181 B.C. in the north-eastern corner of the plain of the Po at the northern end of the Adriatic. It grew to become one of the largest and wealthiest cities of the Roman Empire. After the city was destroyed by Attila the Hun in A.D. 453, the survivors clustered in a drastically reduced settlement around the Basilica, which is the origin of the small present-day town. Most of the ancient city lies unexcavated beneath the surrounding fields. Dates of mint operation: 294 - 324 and 334 - 430 A.D. Mintmarks: AQ, AQOB, AQPS, AQVI, AQVIL, SMAQ.


Constantius II, 22 May 337 - 3 November 361 A.D., with Christian Cross

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One of the earliest Christian crosses on coinage and one of the oldest examples of a Christian cross of any kind affordable to a collector with modest means. The cross was rarely used in early Christian iconography, perhaps because it symbolized a purposely painful and gruesome method of public execution that most early Christians would have personally witnessed. In 315, Constantine abolished crucifixion as punishment in the Roman Empire. The Ichthys, or fish symbol, was used by early Christians. Constantine adopted the Chi-Rho Christ monogram (Christogram) as his banner (labarum). The use of a cross as the most prevalent symbol of Christianity probably gained momentum only after Saint Helena, mother of Constantine the Great, traveled to the Holy Land, c. 326 - 328, and recovered the True Cross.
BB66587. Billon reduced centenionalis, RIC VII Aquileia 126 (R3), Paolucci-Zub 429 (R), LRBC I 658, Cohen VII 105, SRCV V 17682, Hunter V -, VF, well centered, weight 3.378 g, maximum diameter 17.0 mm, die axis 180o, 2nd officina, Aquileia mint, as caesar, 334 - Sep 335 A.D.; obverse FL IVL CONSTANTIVS NOB C, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse GLORIA EXERCITVS (glory of the army), two soldiers standing confronted, two standards in center between them, each holds a spear in outer hand and rests inner hand on grounded shield, cross in center on exergue line, AQS in exergue; rare; SOLD


Diocletian, 20 November 284 - 1 May 305 A.D.

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Aquileia was founded by the Romans as a Latin colony in 181 B.C. in the north-eastern corner of the plain of the Po at the northern end of the Adriatic. It grew to become one of the largest and wealthiest cities of the Roman Empire. After the city was destroyed by Attila the Hun in A.D. 453, the survivors clustered in a drastically reduced settlement around the Basilica, which is the origin of the small present-day town. Most of the ancient city lies unexcavated beneath the surrounding fields.
RB54373. Billon follis, Paolucci-Zub 13 (also with divided reverse legend), RIC VI Aquileia 29a, VF, weight 8.418 g, maximum diameter 26.2 mm, die axis 180o, Aquileia mint, 300 A.D.; obverse IMP DIOCLETIANVS P F AVG, laureate head right; reverse SACRA MONET AVGG ET CAESS NOSTR (the sacred money of our two emperors and two princes), Moneta standing left, scales in right and cornucopia in left hand, AQP in exergue; nearly full and unusually heavy silvering; SOLD


Constantine II, 22 May 337 - March or April 340 A.D.

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The cross was rarely used in early Christian iconography, perhaps because it symbolized a purposely painful and gruesome method of public execution that most early Christians would have personally witnessed. In 315, Constantine abolished crucifixion as punishment in the Roman Empire. The Ichthys, or fish symbol, was used by early Christians. Constantine adopted the Chi-Rho Christ monogram (Christogram) as his banner (labarum). The use of a cross as the most prevalent symbol of Christianity probably gained momentum after Saint Helena, mother of Constantine the Great, traveled to the Holy Land, c. 326 - 328, and recovered the True Cross.
RL62722. Billon reduced centenionalis, RIC VII Aquileia 125 (R4), Paolucci-Zub 348 (R), VF, weight 2.198 g, maximum diameter 17.2 mm, die axis 0o, 2nd officina, Aquileia mint, as caesar, 330 - 335 A.D.; obverse CONSTANTINVS IVN NOB C, laureate and cuirassed bust right; reverse GLORIA EXERCITVS (glory of the army), two soldiers standing facing, heads turned inward confronted, two standards in center between them, each holds a spear in outer hand and rests inner hand on grounded shield, cross in center, AQS in exergue; rare; SOLD


Crispus, Caesar, 1 March 317 - 326 A.D.

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VOT V abbreviates Votis Quinquennalibus, which means Crispus has completed vows (prayers and sacrifices) for five years of rule. In a religious context, votum, plural vota, is a vow or promise made to a deity. The word comes from the past participle of voveo, vovere; as the result of the verbal action, a vow, or promise. It may refer also to the fulfillment of this vow, that is, the thing promised. The votum is thus an aspect of the contractual nature of Roman religion and sacrifice, a bargaining expressed by "do ut des" (I give that you might give).
RL56757. Billon centenionalis, RIC VII Aquileia 69 (R3), Paolucci-Zub 297 (R), Cohen VII 31, SRCV IV 16748, VF, weight 3.021 g, maximum diameter 19.8 mm, die axis 0o, 3rd officina, Aquileia mint, 320 - 321 A.D.; obverse CRISPVS NOB CAES, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse CAESARVM NOSTRORVM (our prince), VOT V in wreath, AQT in exergue; rare; SOLD


Constans, 9 September 337 - 19 January 350 A.D.

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The reverse probably advertises the resettlement and protection of Christian Goths in 348. Persecuted by the Gothic chieftain Athanaric, Wulfila obtained permission from Constantius II to migrate with his flock of converts to Moesia. They settled near Nicopolis ad Istrum.
RL21198. Billon light maiorina, RIC VIII Aquileia 103 (C), Paolucci-Zub 418, LRBC II 888, SRCV V 18690, Cohen VII 18, gVF, weight 4.182 g, maximum diameter 20.8 mm, die axis 0o, 1st officina, Aquileia mint, post reform, 21 Apr 348 - 19 Jan 350 A.D.; obverse D N CONSTA-NS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust left, celestial globe in right hand; reverse FEL TEMP REPARATIO (happy times restored), helmeted soldier advancing right, looking back left, leading barbarian with right hand from hut under tree, transverse spear in left hand, AQT in exergue; SOLD


Magnentius, 18 January 350 - 10 August 353 A.D.

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RIC lists this type as common but we have never handled another example and did not find even a single specimen online. There is a coin listed as the type on Coin Archives but it is misattributed and actually RIC 162 (star above wreath reverse upper right). We believe it is rare.
RL70692. Billon heavy maiorina, RIC VIII Aquileia 161, Paolucci-Zub 560 (R), LRBC II 904, SRCV V 18802, aVF, rough, weight 4.245 g, maximum diameter 23.2 mm, die axis 180o, 2nd officina, Aquileia mint, 18 Jan 350 - spring 351 A.D.; obverse D N MAGNEN-TIVS P F AVG, bare-headed, draped, and cuirassed bust right, A behind; reverse GLORIA ROMANORVM (glory of the Romans), Magnentius riding right, spearing enemy, shield and broken spear on the ground below horse, wreath above star upper right, AQS between two palm fronds in exergue; from the Butte College Foundation, ex Lindgren; rare; SOLD


Constantius II, 22 May 337 - 3 November 361 A.D.

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While Constantius II was off in the east fighting the Sassanid Persian king Shapur, his brothers were fighting each other. In 340, Constantine II was killed in an ambush near Aquileia (where this coin was struck). Constans took control of his deceased brother's territory and became sole ruler of the Western two-thirds of the empire. This division lasted until 350, when Constans was assassinated by forces of the usurper Magnentius.
RL90770. Billon reduced centenionalis, RIC VIII Aquileia 21, Paolucci-Zub 461, LRBC I 687a, SRVC V 18366, gVF, nice style, weight 1.640 g, maximum diameter 15.0 mm, die axis 0o, 1st officina, Aquileia mint, 9 Sep 337 - Apr 340 A.D.; obverse CONSTANTIVS P F AVG, laurel and rosette-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse GLORIA EXERCITVS (glory of the army), two soldiers standing facing, flanking one standard in center, heads confronted, each holds a spear in outer hand and rests inner hand on grounded shield, two small branches flanking top of standard, AQP in exergue; SOLD


City of Rome Commemorative, 334 - 335 A.D.

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On 11 May 330, Constantine I refounded Byzantium, renamed it Constantinopolis after himself, and moved the capital of the Roman Empire from Rome to his new city. The new capital was Christian, old gods and traditions were either replaced or assimilated into a framework of Christian symbolism. Constantine built the new Church of the Holy Apostles on the site of a temple to Aphrodite. Generations later there was the story that a divine vision led Constantine to this spot. The capital would often be compared to the 'old' Rome as Nova Roma Constantinopolitana, the "New Rome of Constantinople." Special commemorative coins were issued with types for both Rome and Constantinople to advertise the importance of the new capital.
RL24108. Billon reduced centenionalis, RIC VII Aquileia 122, Paolucci-Zub 272 (R2), VF, weight 2.475 g, maximum diameter 17.9 mm, die axis 180o, 2nd officina, Aquileia mint, 334 - 335 A.D.; obverse VRBS ROMA, helmeted bust of Roma left wearing imperial mantle; reverse she-wolf standing left, head turned back right, suckling the infant twins Romulus and Remus, two stars above, AQS in exergue; rare; SOLD


Licinius I, 11 November 308 - 18 September 324 A.D.

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On 7 March 321, Constantine issued an edict proclaiming Dies Solis Invicti (Sunday) as the day of rest; trade was forbidden but agriculture was allowed.
RL38207. Billon centenionalis, RIC VII Aquileia 86 (R1), Paolucci-Zub 195 (R), SRCV IV 15345, Cohen VII 20, Hunter V -, Choice gVF, nice style and centering, weight 3.510 g, maximum diameter 19.7 mm, die axis 180o, 2nd officina, Aquileia mint, 320 - 321 A.D.; obverse IMP LICINIVS AVG, laureate head right; reverse DOMININLICINI AVG, VOT / XX in two lines within wreath, wreath tied at the bottom and closed with a jewel at the top, AQS in exergue; scarce; SOLD


Constantine the Great, Early 307 - 22 May 337 A.D.

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Aquileia was founded by the Romans as a Latin colony in 181 B.C. in the north-eastern corner of the plain of the Po at the northern end of the Adriatic. It grew to become one of the largest and wealthiest cities of the Roman Empire. After the city was destroyed by Attila the Hun in A.D. 452, the survivors clustered in a drastically reduced settlement around the Basilica, which is the origin of the small present-day town. Most of the ancient city lies unexcavated beneath the surrounding fields.
RL58127. Billon centenionalis, RIC VII Aquileia 85, Paolucci-Zub 261, VF, weight 3.506 g, maximum diameter 18.9 mm, die axis 0o, 1st officina, Aquileia mint, 321 A.D.; obverse CONSTANTIVS AVG, laureate head right; reverse D N CONSTANTINI MAX AVG, VOT / XX within wreath, AQP in exergue; SOLD




  




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REFERENCES|

Paolucci, R. & A. Zub. La monetazione di Aquileia Romana. (Padova, 2000).

Catalog current as of Wednesday, August 21, 2019.
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Aquileia