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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Types| ▸ |Happy Days||View Options:  |  |  |   

FELicium TEMPorum REPARATIO

The reverse legend FEL TEMP REPARATIO was used on coins from the time of Constans and Constantius II to that of Gratian (337 to 375). Although the intended reading of this legend is not completely certain, it most likely reads, FELicium TEMPorum REPARATIO, meaning "re-establishment of the happy times." We prefer to loosely translate it to the more current and lyrical expression, "Happy Days are Here Again!" From the coins below, it seems the Romans had a very different concept of what made for happy times.


Constantius II, 22 May 337 - 3 November 361 A.D.

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In 354, Constantius II recalled his legate (and cousin) Constantius Gallus to Constantinople after receiving unfavorable reports about him. Caesar of the East, Gallus had successfully suppressed revolts in Palestine and central Anatolia. Constantius stripped him of his rank and later had him executed in Pola (in modern Croatia).
RL71438. Billon centenionalis, RIC VIII Antioch 135, near Mint State, weight 5.073 g, maximum diameter 22.4 mm, die axis 135o, 11th officina, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 350 - 355 A.D.; obverse D N CONSTANTIVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse FEL TEMP REPARATIO (happy times restored), soldier standing left, shield on left arm, spear in right hand, spearing horseman who falls forward on the neck of his horse, shield on ground right, Γ upper left, ANAI in exergue; SOLD


Faustina Junior, Augusta 146 - Winter 175/176 A.D., Wife of Marcus Aurelius

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"Saeculi Felicitas" means happy times, referring to the empire's new heirs. The two infants are the twin sons of Marcus Aurelius and Faustina Junior, Commodus and Antoninus, born 31 August 161, at Lanuvium, near Rome. Antoninus died at age four. Commodus succeeded Marcus Aurelius as emperor.
RS67697. Silver denarius, RIC III MA712; RSC II 191; BMCRE IV MA139; Hunter II p. 352, 16; SRCV II 5260, VF, weight 3.603 g, maximum diameter 18.6 mm, die axis 225o, Rome mint, struck under Marcus Aurelius, 161 A.D.; obverse FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, diademed and draped bust right; reverse SAECVLI FELICIT (era of good fortune), two infant boys seated facing on a draped throne; SOLD


Constantius II, 22 May 337 - 3 November 361 A.D.

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Constantius II, unlike his father, allowed Christians to persecute pagans and Jews. Christian clergy inspired angry crowds, which attacked and destroyed synagogues and temples. On 7 May 351, a Jewish revolt broke out in Palestine. The rebels destroyed the Roman garrison in a surprise night attack and acquired the garrison's weapons. The rebels destroyed Diopolis and Tiberias and killed the people of different ethnicities, including Greeks and Samaritans. In 352, Constantius Gallus sent his general (magister equitum) Ursicinus to put down the revolt. Diocesarea, the epicenter of the revolt, was razed to the ground. Ursicinus ordered the execution of thousands of Jews, even children. After the revolt, a permanent garrison was stationed in Galilee.
RL90420. Billon heavy maiorina, RIC VIII Constantinople 82, LRBC II 2026, Voetter 28, SRCV V 18148, Cohen VII 44 var., gVF, excellent centering and bold strike, edge split, weight 6.037 g, maximum diameter 23.9 mm, die axis 180o, 1st officina, Constantinople (Istanbul, Turkey) mint, 348 - 351 A.D.; obverse D N CONSTANTIVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse FEL TEMP REPARATIO (happy times restored), soldier advancing left, in military garb, shield on his left arm, spearing a fallen enemy horseman, who is turned toward the soldier and raising his left hand, horseman's shield on the ground to right, Γ left, CONSA* in exergue; SOLD


Constantius II, 22 May 337 - 3 November 361 A.D.

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The final A in the mintmark appears as H, but it must be a carelessly engraved A because IA is the officina (workshop) mark and there were only eleven officina in operation. IA is the Greek numeral eleven. IH is the Greek numeral eighteen. Open topped A's are not unusual in this period.
RL68726. Billon heavy maiorina, RIC VIII Constantinople 82, LRBC II 2026, SRCV V 18148, Choice gVF, weight 5.995 g, maximum diameter 23.8 mm, die axis 330o, 11th officina, Constantinople (Istanbul, Turkey) mint, 348 - 351 A.D.; obverse D N CONSTANTIVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse FEL TEMP REPARATIO (happy times restored), soldier standing left, shield on left arm, spear in right hand, spearing bearded fallen horseman wearing, shield on ground right, Γ upper left, CONSIA* in exergue; SOLD


Constantius II, 22 May 337 - 3 November 361 A.D.

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The reverse legend can be translated, "Happy Times Restored" but we prefer to loosely translate it to the more current and lyrical expression, "Happy Days are Here Again!"
RL71439. Bronze centenionalis, RIC VIII Antioch 132, LRBC 2625, Voetter 26, EF, perfect centering, excellent style, ragged flan, weight 5.162 g, maximum diameter 24.4 mm, die axis 135o, 2nd officina, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 348 - 350 A.D.; obverse D N CONSTANTIVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse FEL TEMP REPARATIO (happy times restored), Soldier standing left in military attire, shield on left arm, spearing diademed and bearded fallen horseman turned to face him and raising arm, Γ in upper left field, ANB exergue; SOLD


Constantius II, 22 May 337 - 3 November 361 A.D.

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On 28 September 351, at Battle of Mursa Major, Constantius II defeated the usurper Magnentius. The battle was one of the bloodiest in Roman military history.
RL85975. Bronze heavy maiorina, cf. RIC VIII Cyzicus 96, LRBC II 2488, SRCV V 18166, Cohen VII 46, Hunter V - (all normal weight < 5.20 g), VF, well centered, corrosion, edge cracks, overstruck(?), weight 10.608 g, maximum diameter 25.1 mm, die axis 180o, uncertain mint, 351 - 354 A.D.; obverse D N CONSTANTIVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse FEL TEMP REPARATIO (happy times restored), soldier standing left spearing fallen horseman, horseman beardless and wearing a pointed cap, shield on the ground at feet, Γ upper left, SMK∆ in exergue; unusual thick flan, more than double normal weight (10.608g vs. normal < 5.20g), ex Frank Kovacs; very rare variety or error; SOLD


Constans, 9 September 337 - 19 January 350 A.D.

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The labarum, was a type of Roman cavalry standard, a vexillum with a military ensign marked with the Christogram (Greek monogram of Christ). It was an object of religious veneration amongst the soldiers, who paid it divine honors.
RL11080. Billon heavy maiorina, RIC VIII Aquileia 117, LRBC II 894, SRCV V 16872, Cohen VII 13, EF, weight 5.240 g, maximum diameter 24.4 mm, die axis 180o, 2nd officina, Aquileia mint, 348 - 350 A.D.; obverse D N CONSTANS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right, A behind; reverse FEL TEMP REPARATIO (happy times restored), Constans standing left in galley left, Phoenix on globe in right hand, labarum in left hand, Victory seated in stern steering, A left, AQS in exergue; ex Colosseum Coin Exchange; SOLD


Procopius, 28 September 365 - 27 May 366 A.D.

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Procopius' bronze was typically struck on undersized flans. Perfectly centered coins on large flans occur very rarely and if uncirculated and with good detail such as on this specimen they retail for at least $600 (2003).
RB71806. Bronze centenionalis, LRBC II 2082, RIC IX Constantinopolis 17(a)6, Cohen VIII 8, SRCV V 19883, VF, double struck, well centered on a somewhat ragged flan, weight 2.509 g, maximum diameter 20.8 mm, die axis 0o, 4th officina, Constantinople (Istanbul, Turkey) mint, 28 Sep 365 - Apr 366 A.D.; obverse D N PROCO-PIVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed draped and cuirassed bust left; reverse REPARATIO FEL TEMP (happy times restored), Procopius standing facing, head right, labarum in right hand, resting left hand on grounded shield, uncertain object at feet, Chi-Rho in upper right field, CONS∆ in exergue; rare (R2); SOLD


Dacian Tribal Coinage, Mid 4th - Early 5th Century A.D., Imitative of Constantius II

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The referenced coin, struck from the same dies, in the collection of the National Museum in Belgrade, was found at Tibiscum (near Jupa, Romania). Tibiscum was a Dacian settlement. When the Romans invaded Dacia, they built a castrum at Tibiscum which later grew to be a city. Cohors I Vindelicorum, Numerus Maurorum Tibiscensium, and Numerus Palmyrenorum Tibiscensium were stationed there. It probably became a municipium under Septimius Severus, but the title is attested by an inscription from the reign of Gallienus.
RL65431. Bronze barbarous imitative, Vasic 20 (same dies!), CHOICE gVF, nice patina, weight 5.732 g, maximum diameter 22.1 mm, die axis 270o, tribal mint, c. 350 - 360 A.D.; obverse pseudo-legend imitating D N CONSTANTIVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse pseudo-legend imitating FEL TEMP REPARATIO (happy times restored), soldier spearing fallen horseman, shield on the ground, Γ upper left, pseudo-mintmark in exergue; SOLD


Constans, 9 September 337 - 19 January 350 A.D.

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The Roman poet Ovid tells the story of the Phoenix: 'Most beings spring from other individuals; but there is a certain kind which reproduces itself. The Assyrians call it the Phoenix. It does not live on fruit or flowers, but on frankincense and odoriferous gums. When it has lived five hundred years, it builds itself a nest in the branches of an oak, or on the top of a palm tree. In this it collects cinnamon and spikenard, and myrrh, and of these materials builds a pile on which it deposits itself, and dying, breathes out its last breath amidst odors. From the body of the parent bird, a young Phoenix issues forth, destined to live as long a life as its predecessor. When this has grown up and gained sufficient strength, it lifts its nest from the tree (its own cradle and its parent's sepulcher), and carries it to the city of Heliopolis in Egypt, and deposits it in the temple of the Sun.'
RL89950. Bronze quarter maiorina, RIC VIII Siscia 247, LRBC II 1131, SRCV V 18718, Cohen VII 22, Hunter V -, Choice aEF, glossy jade green patina, light scratches, minor edge chipping, weight 2.253 g, maximum diameter 18.3 mm, die axis 0o, 2nd officina, Siscia (Sisak, Croatia) mint, 348 - 19 Jan 350 A.D.; obverse D N CONSTANS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse FEL TEMP REPARATIO (happy times restored), radiate Phoenix standing right on pyre, symbol in right field, BSIS in exergue; SOLD




  




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Catalog current as of Tuesday, November 19, 2019.
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FEL TEMP REPARATION