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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Themes & Provenance ▸ Types ▸ Happy DaysView Options:  |  |  | 

FELicium TEMPorum REPARATIO

The reverse legend FEL TEMP REPARATIO was used on coins from the time of Constans and Constantius II to that of Gratian (337 to 375). Although the intended reading of this legend is not completely certain, it most likely reads, FELicium TEMPorum REPARATIO, meaning "re-establishment of the happy times." We prefer to loosely translate it to the more current and lyrical expression, "Happy Days are Here Again!" From the coins below, it seems the Romans had a very different concept of what made for happy times.


Procopius, 28 September 365 - 27 May 366 A.D.

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According to Zosimus, Julian gave Procopius an imperial robe, informing him of his intent to make him his successor. But Julian did not tell anyone of this intent and Jovian was acclaimed emperor. Procopius gave Jovian the robe. He told Jovian of Julian's intention but asked the new Emperor to allow him to retire to private life. Jovian accepted and Procopius and his family retired to Caesarea Mazaca.
RL79986. Bronze centenionalis, LRBC II 2081, RIC IX 17a, Cohen VIII 8, SRCV V 19883, gVF, excellent portrait, nice green patina, edge chip, weight 2.661 g, maximum diameter 21.4 mm, die axis 0o, 3rd officina, Constantinople (Istanbul, Turkey) mint, 28 Sep 365 - Apr 366 A.D.; obverse D N PROCO-PIVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust left; reverse REPARATIO FEL TEMP (happy times restored), Procopius standing facing, head right, labarum in right hand, resting left hand on grounded shield, object on ground to left, Christogram above right, CONSΓ in exergue; rare; $135.00 (120.15)


Constans, 9 September 337 - 19 January 350 A.D.

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The Roman historian Eutropius says Constans "indulged in great vices," in reference to his homosexuality, and Aurelius Victor stated that Constans had a reputation for scandalous behavior with "handsome barbarian hostages." Nevertheless, Constans did sponsor a decree alongside Constantius II that ruled that marriage based on "unnatural" sex should be punished meticulously. However, the decree may have only outlawed homosexual marriage. It may also be that Constans was not expressing his own feeling when promulgating the legislation but was rather trying to placate public outrage at his own perceived indecencies.
RL77064. Billon heavy maiorina, RIC VIII Thessalonica 122, LRBC II 1649, SRCV V 18675, Cohen VII 13, Hunter V 56 var. (3rd officina), VF, traces of silvering, well centered, some die wear, some light corrosion, weight 5.017 g, maximum diameter 23.0 mm, die axis 180o, 1st officina, Thessalonica (Salonika, Greece) mint, 348 - 350 A.D.; obverse D N CONSTANS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right, A behind; reverse FEL TEMP REPARATIO (happy times restored), Constans standing left on galley, Victory on globe in right hand, labarum (chi rho Christogram standard) in left, Victory seated in stern steering ship, A in left field, TSA in exergue; $100.00 (89.00)


Constantius II, 22 May 337 - 3 November 361 A.D.

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The reverse legend can be translated, "Happy Times Restored" but we prefer to loosely translate it to the more current and lyrical expression, "Happy Days are Here Again!"
RL74561. Billon heavy maiorina, RIC VIII Thessalonica 123, LRBC II 50, SRCV V 18136, Cohen VII 46, Hunter V -, Choice VF, well centered and struck, some silvering, porous, weight 4.428 g, maximum diameter 23.7 mm, die axis 180o, 4th officina, Thessalonica (Salonika, Greece) mint, 348 - 350 A.D.; obverse D N CONSTANTIVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from the front, A behind; reverse FEL TEMP REPARATIO (happy times restored), soldier standing left, with right hand spearing horseman whose mount has fallen, shield on his left arm, shield on the ground right, A left, TS∆ in exergue; $80.00 (71.20)


Constantius Gallus, Caesar, 28 September351 - Winter 354 A.D.

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On 7 May 351, after Constantius Gallus arrived at Antiocha, a Jewish revolt broke out in Palestine. In 352, Gallus sent his general (magister equitum) Ursicinus to put down the revolt. The rebels destroyed Diopolis and Tiberias. Diocesarea was razed to the ground. Ursicinus gave the order to kill thousands of Jews, even children. After the revolt, a permanent garrison was stationed in Galilee.
BB83763. Billon reduced maiorina, RIC VIII Heraclea 91, LRBC II 1901, SRCV V 19017, Cohen VIII 16, Hunter V -, F, green patina, tight flan, weight 2.310 g, maximum diameter 17.5 mm, die axis 180o, 5th officina, Heraclea (Marmara Ereglisi, Turkey) mint, c. 353 - 6 Nov 355; obverse D N CONSTANTIVS NOB C, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse FEL TEMP REPARATIO (happy times restored), helmeted soldier standing left, shield on left arm, spearing fallen horseman, shield on the ground right, horseman is turned toward the soldier and extends his left arm, SMHE in exergue; $30.00 (26.70)


Constantius II, 22 May 337 - 3 November 361 A.D.

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The Roman poet Ovid tells the story of the Phoenix: 'Most beings spring from other individuals; but there is a certain kind which reproduces itself. The Assyrians call it the Phoenix. It does not live on fruit or flowers, but on frankincense and odoriferous gums. When it has lived five hundred years, it builds itself a nest in the branches of an oak, or on the top of a palm tree. In this it collects cinnamon and spikenard, and myrrh, and of these materials builds a pile on which it deposits itself, and dying, breathes out its last breath amidst odors. From the body of the parent bird, a young Phoenix issues forth, destined to live as long a life as its predecessor. When this has grown up and gained sufficient strength, it lifts its nest from the tree (its own cradle and its parent's sepulcher), and carries it to the city of Heliopolis in Egypt, and deposits it in the temple of the Sun.'
BB83784. Bronze quarter maiorina, RIC VIII Constantinople 93 (S), LRBC II 2019, Voetter 36, SRCV V 18253, Cohen VII 57, Hunter V -, aVF, ragged flan, weight 2.767 g, maximum diameter 18.3 mm, die axis 180o, 6th officina, Constantinople (Istanbul, Turkey) mint, c. 348 - 15 Mar 351 A.D.; obverse D N CONSTANTIVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse FEL TEMP REPARATIO (happy times restored), radiate Phoenix standing right on globe, CONSS* in exergue; scarce; $22.00 (19.58)







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Catalog current as of Wednesday, September 20, 2017.
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FEL TEMP REPARATION