Coins and Antiquities Consignment Shop
  Welcome Guest. Please login or register. All items are guaranteed authentic for eternity! Please call us if you have questions 252-646-1958. Thanks for your business! Welcome Guest. Please login or register. Internet challenged? We are happy to take your order over the phone. Please call if you have questions 252-646-1958. Thanks for your business!

Catalog Main Menu
Fine Coins Showcase

Antiquities Showcase
Recent Additions
Recent Price Reductions

Show empty categories
Shop Search
Shopping Cart
Contact Us
About Forum
Shopping at Forum
Our Guarantee
Payment Options
Shipping Options & Fees
Privacy & Security
Forum Staff
Selling Your Coins
Identifying Your Coin
FAQs
   View Categories
Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Themes & Provenance ▸ Heros ▸ RomulusView Options:  |  |  |   

Romulus

Romulus and Remus are the mythical twin founders of Rome. Their grandfather was Numitor, king of Alba Longa, a descendant of the Trojan Prince Aeneas and father to their mother, Rhea Silvia. Numitor's brother Amulius deposed him, killed his sons and forced Rhea to become a Vestal Virgin, but Rhea conceived Romulus and Remus by Mars (or Hercules). Amulius exposed the newborns to die but a she-wolf found and suckled them. A shepherd and his wife raised them to manhood. The twins were natural leaders, and acquired many followers. When told their true identities, they killed Amulius, restored Numitor to the throne of Alba Longa and decided to found a new city for themselves. Romulus wished to build the new city on the Palatine Hill but Remus preferred the Aventine Hill. They agreed to determine the site through augury. Romulus received the more favorable signs but each claimed the results in his favor. Remus was killed in the dispute. Romulus named the new city Rome, after himself, and created the Roman Legions and the Roman Senate. Rome's population was swelled by landless refugees and outlaws, mostly men. They abducted women from the neighboring Sabine tribes, which led to war but eventually resulted the Sabines and Romans joining. In later life Romulus became increasingly autocratic, disappeared in mysterious circumstances and was deified as the god Quirinus, the divine persona of the Roman people. Ancient historians had no doubt that Romulus gave his name to the city. Most modern historians believe the mythological narrative is mostly or entirely fiction.


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Plutarch's Life of Romulus describes Rome's first triumph after Romulus' victory over Acron, king of the Ceninenses who attacked Rome after the rape of the Sabine Women: "...Romulus, that he might perform his vow in the most acceptable manner to Jupiter, and make the pomp of it delightful to the eye of the city, cut down a tall oak which he saw growing in the camp, trimmed to the shape of a trophy, and fastened on it Acron's whole suit of armor disposed in proper form; then he himself, girding his clothes about him, and crowning his head with a laurel garland, his hair gracefully flowing, carried the trophy resting erect upon his right shoulder, and so marched on, singing songs of triumph, and his whole army following after, the citizens all receiving him with acclamations of joy and wonder. The procession of this day was the origin and model of all after triumphs..."
RS87769. Silver denarius, RIC II 266f (S), RSC II 1316b, BMCRE III 712, Hunter II 236, Strack II 263, SRCV II 3538 var. (slight drapery), Choice EF, light tone, much luster, radiating flow lines, some die wear, tiny edge cracks, weight 3.397 g, maximum diameter 18.7 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, c. 138 A.D.; obverse HADRIANVS AVG COS III P P, laureate and draped bust right, seen from behind; reverse ROMVLO CONDITORI (to Romulus the founder), Romulus in military dress advancing right, transverse spear in right hand, spolia opima (trophy of captured arms) in left hand over left shoulder; ex Aureo & Calico, Roma Aeterna Collection auction (09 Nov 2017), lot 71; scarce; SOLD


Roman Republic, C. Memmius C.f., 56 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Ceres a goddess of agriculture, grain crops, fertility and motherly relationships, was listed among the Di Consentes, Rome's equivalent to the Twelve Olympians of Greek mythology. The Romans saw her as the counterpart of the Greek goddess Demeter, whose mythology was reinterpreted for Ceres in Roman art and literature.
RR48286. Silver denarius, Sydenham 921, Crawford 427/2, RSC I Memmia 9, gVF, toned, old scratches, weight 3.832 g, maximum diameter 19.6 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 56 B.C.; obverse Q VIRINVS CMEMMICF, laureate and bearded head of Romulus right; reverse MEMMIVS AED CERIALIA PREIMVS FECIT, Ceres seated right, torch in left, grain ears in right, serpent at feet; SOLD


Roman Republic, Sextus Pompeius Fostlus, c. 137 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
This family was of plebeian origin and apparently claimed descent from Faustulus, the royal shepherd of Amulius. Faustulus found the infants Romulus and Remus, being suckled by the she-wolf (Lupa) at the foot of the Palatine Hill. Their cradle, in which they had been abandoned in the Tiber, was overturned under a fig tree. Faustulus and his wife, Acca Larentia, raised them. Lupa (she-wolf) was an ancient Latin slang term for prostitute. In some versions of the myth, Larentia was a prostitute.
RR58579. Silver denarius, Crawford 235/1c, Sydenham 461, RSC I Pompeia 1a, BMCRR I Rome 927, RBW Collection 972, SRCV I 112, gVF, weight 3.711 g, maximum diameter 19.1 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, c. 137 B.C.; obverse head of Roma left in winged helmet, crest with griffin head, peaked visor in three pieces, wearing earring with two beaded drops and necklace, X below chin, jug behind; reverse she-wolf standing right suckling Romulus and Remus, fig tree with bird on trunk and two on branches in center background, to left the shepherd Faustulus standing right, FOSTLVS downward on left, SEX PO upward on right ROMA in exergue; ex Sayles and Lavender; SOLD


Roman Republic, Sextus Pompeius Fostlus, c. 137 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
This family was of plebeian origin and apparently claimed descent from Faustulus, the royal shepherd of Amulius. Faustulus found the infants Romulus and Remus, being suckled by the she-wolf (Lupa) at the foot of the Palatine Hill. Their cradle, in which they had been abandoned in the Tiber, was overturned under a fig tree. Faustulus and his wife, Acca Larentia, raised them. Lupa (she-wolf) was an ancient Latin slang term for prostitute. In some versions of the myth, Larentia was a prostitute.
SH63079. Silver denarius, Crawford 235/1c, Sydenham 461, RSC I Pompeia 1a, BMCRR I Rome 927, RBW Collection 972, SRCV I 112, VF, toned, weight 3.766 g, maximum diameter 20.0 mm, die axis 225o, Rome mint, c. 137 B.C.; obverse head of Roma left in winged helmet, crest with griffin head, peaked visor in three pieces, wearing earring with two beaded drops and necklace, X below chin, jug behind; reverse she-wolf standing right suckling Romulus and Remus, fig tree with bird on trunk and two on branches in center background, to left the shepherd Faustulus standing right, FOSTLVS downward on left, SEX PO upward on right ROMA in exergue; SOLD


City of Rome Commemorative, 330 - 331 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
On some high grade examples of the VRBS ROMA series, a certain symbol can be seen or guessed on the shoulder of the wolf. It might look like the letter Θ (at Thessalonica and Alexandria) or a flock of hair, but on this well struck and preserved wolf there is an obvious star with rounded tips, different from the two above. There are no such symbols on earlier depictions (Republic and early empire) of the she-wolf as far as we know.
RL29336. Billon reduced centenionalis, RIC VII Rome 338, LRBC I 540, SRCV IV 16507, Cohen VII 17, Hunter V -, gVF, weight 2.622 g, maximum diameter 18.1 mm, die axis 180o, 4th officina, Rome mint, 330 - 331 A.D.; obverse VRBS ROMA, helmeted bust of Roma left wearing imperial mantle; reverse she-wolf standing left, head turned back right, suckling the infant twins Romulus and Remus, two stars above, RBQ in exergue; rare; SOLD


Severus Alexander, 13 March 222 - March 235 A.D., Parium, Mysia

Click for a larger photo
Founded in 709 B.C., the ancient city of Parion is now the village of Kemer in the township of Biga in Canakkale province of Turkey. In the Roman period, it was a major coastal city with two harbors used to connect Thrace with Anatolia. This was the main customs station through which all goods bound for Byzantium from Greece and the Aegean had to pass. It belonged to the Delian League. In the Hellenistic period, it came under the domain of Lysimachus, and subsequently the Attalid dynasty. In Roman times, it was a colonia, within the province of Asia. After that province was divided in the 4th century, it was in the province of Hellespontus. The ancient coinage of Parium is quite abundant.
RB75148. Orichalcum AE 23, SNG BnF 1505, Lindgren-Kovacs 280 var. (bust from front), BMC Mysia -, SNG Cop -, SNGvA -, SNG Tb -, SNG Hunterian -, SNG Righetti -, gVF, well centered, exotic style, some inscription not fully struck, weight 6.424 g, maximum diameter 22.5 mm, die axis 300o, Parium (Kemer, Canakkale, Turkey) mint, as caesar, 26 Jun 221 - 13 Mar 222 A.D.; obverse M AVP ALEXANdRU SLES (blundered, S's reversed), bare headed, draped bust right, from behind; reverse wolf suckling twins Romulus and Remus, C G I H above, PAR in exergue (Colonia Gemella Julia Hadriana Pariana); very rare; SOLD


City of Rome Commemorative, 330 - 331 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
On some high grade examples of the VRBS ROMA series, a certain symbol can be seen or guessed on the shoulder of the wolf. It might look like the letter Θ (at Thessalonica) or a flock of hair, but on this well struck and preserved wolf there is an obvious star, identical to the two above. There are no such symbols on earlier depictions (Republic and early empire) of the she-wolf as far as we know.
RL29455. Billon reduced centenionalis, RIC VII Lyons 242 (R2), Bastien Lyon 201, LRBC I 184, SRCV IV 16490, Cohen VII 17, Hunter V -, EF, flan crack, weight 2.272 g, maximum diameter 17.1 mm, die axis 0o, 1st officina, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, 330 - 331 A.D.; obverse VRBS ROMA, helmeted bust of Roma left wearing imperial mantle; reverse she-wolf standing left, head turned back right, suckling the infant twins Romulus and Remus, two stars above, PLG in exergue; SOLD


Antoninus Pius, August 138 - 7 March 161 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Faustulus, a shepherd, found the infants Romulus and Remus, being suckled by the she-wolf (Lupa) at the foot of the Palatine Hill. Their cradle, in which they had been abandoned in the Tiber, was overturned under a fig tree. Faustulus and his wife, Acca Larentia, raised the children. Lupa (she-wolf) was an ancient Latin slang term for prostitute. In some versions of the myth, Larentia was a prostitute.
RB65381. Orichalcum sestertius, BMCRE IV 1318, RIC III 648, Cohen II 917 var. (wolf looks back), SRCV II 4121, gF, weight 22.606 g, maximum diameter 30.7 mm, die axis 45o, Rome mint, 140 - 144 A.D.; obverse ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P, laureate head right; reverse TR POT COS III, she-wolf standing right, suckling the twins Romulus and Remus, S C (senatus consulto) in exergue; scarce; SOLD


Severus Alexander, 13 March 222 - March 235 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
In 228 A.D., Shah Ardashir I, four years after establishing the Sassanian Persian Empire, completed his conquest of Parthia.
RB51534. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC IV 626, Cohen IV 591, BMCRE VI 524, SRCV II 8023, VF, weight 26.669 g, maximum diameter 31.8 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 228 A.D.; obverse IMP SEV ALEXANDER AVG, laureate bust right with slight draper on far shoulder; reverse VIRTVS AVGVSTI (to the valor of the Emperor), Alexander as Romulus advancing right, transverse spear in right hand, trophy over shoulder in left; SOLD


City of Rome Commemorative, 332 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
On 11 May 330, Constantine I refounded Byzantium, renamed it Constantinopolis after himself, and moved the capital of the Roman Empire from Rome to his new city. The new capital was Christian, old gods and traditions were either replaced or assimilated into a framework of Christian symbolism. Constantine built the new Church of the Holy Apostles on the site of a temple to Aphrodite. Generations later there was the story that a divine vision led Constantine to this spot. The capital would often be compared to the 'old' Rome as Nova Roma Constantinopolitana, the "New Rome of Constantinople." Special commemorative coins were issued with types for both Rome and Constantinople to advertise the importance of the new capital.
RL67101. Billon reduced centenionalis, Bastien XIII 237, RIC VII Lyons 247 (R3), LRBC I 190, SRCV IV 16492, Cohen VII 17, EF, well centered, slightly ragged flan, weight 2.505 g, maximum diameter 18.3 mm, die axis 225o, 2nd officina, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, 332 A.D.; obverse VRBS ROMA, helmeted bust of Roma left wearing imperial mantle; reverse she-wolf standing left, head turned back right, suckling the infant twins Romulus and Remus, two stars above, SLG in exergue; scarce; SOLD




  




You are viewing a SOLD items page.
Click here to return to the page with AVAILABLE items.
The sale price for a sold item is the private information of the buyer and will not be provided.




Catalog current as of Sunday, May 19, 2019.
Page created in 1.582 seconds.
Romulus