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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Themes & Provenance ▸ Gods, Non-Olympian ▸ JanusView Options:  |  |  |   

Janus

Janus was the Roman god of gates, doors, doorways, time, beginnings, and endings. He is depicted with two faces in opposite directions; one looks back into the past, while the other simultaneously looks forward into the future. He is the namesake of the month January.


Roman Republic, Anonymous, 211 - 206 B.C.

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Janus (or Ianus) was the god of gates, doors, doorways, beginnings and endings. He is most often depicted as having two faces or heads, facing in opposite directions. Janus is believed to be one of the few major deities in Roman mythology that does not have a Greek origin or counterpart.
RR88221. Bronze as, Crawford 56/2, Sydenham 143, BMCRR Rome 373 ff., SRCV I 627, F, green patina, crack, porous, weight 29.386 g, maximum diameter 33.3 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 211 - 206 B.C.; obverse laureate head of bearded Janus, I (mark of value) above, countermark: head right in round punch; reverse war galley prow right, I (mark of value) above, ROMA in exergue; ex Moneta Numismatic Services; $145.00 (123.25)


Roman Republic, OPEI (Q. Opeimius?), 169 - 157 B.C.

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In Roman mythology, Janus (or Ianus) was the god of gates, doors, doorways, and of beginnings and endings. Janus is believed to be one of the few major deities in Roman mythology that does not have a Greek origin or counterpart.
RR88348. Copper as, Crawford 190/1, Sydenham 363, BMCRR Rome 598, RBW Collection 811, SRCV I 701, F, bumps and marks, obverse off center, small edge splits/cracks, weight 26.339 g, maximum diameter 31.0 mm, die axis 45o, Rome mint, 169 - 157 B.C.; obverse laureate head of bearded Janus, I (mark of value) above, linear border; reverse galley prow right, OPEI above, I (mark of value) right, ROMA below, linear border; $100.00 (85.00)


Roman Republic, Marcus Furius L.f. Philus, c. 119 B.C.

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This type commemorates the victory by Cn. Domitius Ahenobarbus and Q. Fabius Maximus over the Allobrogoges and the Averni in Gaul in 121 B.C.
RR88449. Silver denarius, Crawford 281/1, Sydenham 529, BMCRR Italy 555, RSC I Furia 18, RBW Collection 1105, SRCV I 156, aVF, light toning, scratches, weight 3.722 g, maximum diameter 20.0 mm, die axis 165o, Rome mint, c. 119 B.C.; obverse MFOVRILF, bearded, laureate head of Janus, I above center (a vestigial mark of value copied from Janus on the Roman as); reverse Roma standing left, helmeted and draped, transverse long scepter in left hand, with right hand placing wreath on trophy of captured Gallic arms with carnyx and shield on each side, star above, ROMA upward on right, PHILI (PHI ligate) in exergue; ex Naville Numismatics, auction 40 (27 May 2018), lot 489; $100.00 (85.00)


Tenedos, Islands off Troas, c. 550 - 470 B.C.

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Philonome, the second wife of King Cycnus of Colonae, falsely accused her stepson Tenes of rape, using the flutist Eumolpus as witness. Cycnus believed the accusation and tried to kill Tenes and his sister Hemithea by placing them both in a chest, which was set into the ocean. However, the chest landed on the island of Leucophrye, where they made Tenes their king and renamed the island Tenedos. Cycnus later learned the truth, killed Eumolpus, and buried Philonome alive. When Cycnus' ship landed at Tenedos in hopes of reconciliation, Tenes rebuffed him and cut the mooring with a labrys. Tenes fought for the Trojans in the Trojan War and was slain by Achilles. After the war, Agamemnon permitted the Trojan prisoners to build a city north of Mycenea. The city was called Tenea and they founded a sanctuary where sacrifices were offered to Tenes. No flute player was allowed to enter the sacred precinct, and the name of Achilles was not to be uttered. Map of Troas
GS83935. Silver obol, SNG Cop 509; SNGvA 1587; SNG Mnchen 340; SNG Tbingen 2677; BMC Troas p. 91, 7; Rosen 536; Weber 5448, HGC 6 381; SGCV II 5151, VF, tight flan, uneven toning, edge crack, weight 0.584 g, maximum diameter 8.3 mm, Tenedos (Bozcaada, Turkey) mint, c. 550 - 470 B.C.; obverse janiform head of a diademed female left and laureate bearded male right; reverse labrys (double axe), T-E divided by handle, all within an incuse square, no linear border; ex Wilson H Guertin; $90.00 (76.50)


Gnaeus Pompey Junior, Imperator, 47 - 45 B.C., Son of Pompey the Great

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After the murder of his father, Gnaeus Pompey Magnus Junior and his brother Sextus joined the resistance against Caesar in Africa. Together with Metellus Scipio, Cato the Younger and other senators, they prepared to oppose Caesar and his army. Caesar defeated Metellus Scipio and Cato, who subsequently committed suicide, at the Battle of Thapsus in 46 B.C. Gnaeus escaped to the Balearic Islands, where he joined Sextus. Together with Titus Labienus, former general in Caesar's army, the Pompey brothers crossed over to the Hispania, where they raised yet another army. Caesar soon followed and, on 17 March 45 B.C., the armies met in the battle of Munda. Both armies were large and led by able generals. The battle was closely fought, but eventually a cavalry charge by Caesar turned events to his side. In the battle and the panicked escape that followed, Titus Labienus and an estimated 30,000 men of the Pompeian side died. Gnaeus and Sextus managed to escape once again. However, this time, supporters were difficult to find because it was now clear Caesar had won the civil war. Within a few weeks, Gnaeus Pompeius was caught and executed for treason.
RR88023. Leaded bronze as, Crawford 471/1, Sydenham 1040, RPC I 486, BMCRR Spain 84, RBW Collection, 1646, Sear CRI 53, Cohen I 16, SRCV I 1386, aF, tight irregular flan, porosity, scratches, earthen deposits, weight 23.139 g, maximum diameter 30.9 mm, die axis 90o, Hispania probably Tarraco (Tarragona, Spain) mint, 46 - 45 B.C.; obverse laureate and bearded head of Janus, I above; reverse prow of galley right, I right, CN MAG (MA ligate) above, IMP below; scarce; $60.00 (51.00)


Gnaeus Pompey Junior, Imperator, 47 - 45 B.C., Son of Pompey the Great

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After the murder of his father, Gnaeus Pompey Magnus Junior and his brother Sextus joined the resistance against Caesar in Africa. Together with Metellus Scipio, Cato the Younger and other senators, they prepared to oppose Caesar and his army. Caesar defeated Metellus Scipio and Cato, who subsequently committed suicide, at the Battle of Thapsus in 46 B.C. Gnaeus escaped to the Balearic Islands, where he joined Sextus. Together with Titus Labienus, former general in Caesar's army, the Pompey brothers crossed over to the Hispania, where they raised yet another army. Caesar soon followed and, on 17 March 45 B.C., the armies met in the battle of Munda. Both armies were large and led by able generals. The battle was closely fought, but eventually a cavalry charge by Caesar turned events to his side. In the battle and the panicked escape that followed, Titus Labienus and an estimated 30,000 men of the Pompeian side died. Gnaeus and Sextus managed to escape once again. However, this time, supporters were difficult to find because it was now clear Caesar had won the civil war. Within a few weeks, Gnaeus Pompeius was caught and executed for treason.
RR88024. Leaded bronze as, Crawford 471/1, Sydenham 1040, RPC I 486, BMCRR Spain 84, RBW Collection, 1646, Sear CRI 53, Cohen I 16, SRCV I 1386, aF, dark patina, porous, earthen encrustations, weight 23.210 g, maximum diameter 31.0 mm, die axis 240o, Hispania probably Tarraco (Tarragona, Spain) mint, 46 - 45 B.C.; obverse laureate and bearded head of Janus, I above; reverse prow of galley right, I right, CN MAG (MA ligate) above, IMP below; scarce; $60.00 (51.00)


Roman Republic, 169 - 158 B.C.

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In Roman mythology, Janus (or Ianus) was the god of gates, doors, doorways, and of beginnings and endings. Janus is one of the few major deities in Roman mythology that does not have a Greek origin or counterpart.
RR88192. Bronze as, Crawford 181/1, Sydenham 294, RBW Collection 766, BMCRR 502, SRCV I 691, aF, obverse central drill mark, weight 28.132 g, maximum diameter 31.4 mm, die axis 330o, Rome mint, 169 - 158 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Janus, I (mark of value) above; reverse war galley prow right, caps of the Dioscuri above, I (mark of value) before, ROMA below; ex Moneta Numismatic Services; $60.00 (51.00)


Roman Republic, c. 157 - 145 B.C.

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In Roman mythology, Janus (or Ianus) was the god of gates, doors, doorways, and of beginnings and endings. Janus is believed to be one of the few major deities in Roman mythology that does not have a Greek origin or counterpart.
RR88013. Bronze as, cf. RBW Collection 848, Crawford 197 - 198B/b1, Sydenham -, Fair, dark patina, red earthen encrustation, porosity, weight 18.372 g, maximum diameter 31.7 mm, die axis 90o, unofficial(?) mint, c. 157 - 145 B.C.; obverse laureate head of bearded Janus, I (mark of value) above; reverse war galley prow right, I (mark of value) right, ROMA below; $50.00 (42.50)


Thessalonica, Macedonia, 88 - 31 B.C.

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King Cassander of Macedonia founded Thessalonica in 315 B.C. He named it after his wife Thessalonike, a half-sister of Alexander the Great. The Romans made Thessalonica the capital of the Roman province of Macedonia 168 B.C.
RP88127. Bronze reduced as, AMNG III 20, pl. XXIII, 10; SNG Cop 370; SNG ANS 805; BMC Macedonia p. 112, 37, aVF, compact flan cutting off legend and edges types, areas of weak strike, some corrosion, weight 5.160 g, maximum diameter 17.5 mm, die axis 0o, Thessalonika (Salonika, Greece) mint, 88 - 31 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Janus; reverse ΘEΣΣAΛO/NIKHΣ, two Centaurs prancing, back to back, each holding a branch; $50.00 (42.50)


Roman Republic, L. Saufeius, 152 B.C.

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In Roman mythology, Janus (or Ianus) was the god of gates, doors, doorways, and of beginnings and endings. Janus is one of the few major deities in Roman mythology that does not have a Greek origin or counterpart.
RR68445. Bronze as, Crawford 204/2, Sydenham 385, BMCRR Rome 836, RBW Collection 875, SRCV I 720, aF, weight 23.522 g, maximum diameter 31.4 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 152 B.C.; obverse laureate and bearded head of Janus, I (mark of value) above; reverse prow right, crescent over LSAVF (VF ligate) above, I (mark of value) right, ROMA below; $40.00 (34.00)




  



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Janus