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Home>Catalog>Judean&BiblicalCoins>GreekDomination>Hanukkah PAGE 1/212

Hanukkah

In 168 B.C., Antiochus IV ordered the Jews to worship Greek gods. The Temple in Jerusalem was seized and dedicated to Zeus. The Jews revolted and after three years of fighting, Judah Maccabee defeated the Seleukid army. Hanukkah, the Festival of Lights, commemorates the rededication of the Temple in 165 B.C. According to the Talmud, there was only enough consecrated olive oil to fuel the eternal flame in the Temple for one day. Miraculously, the oil burned for eight days, enough time to prepare and consecrate fresh oil. John Hyrcanus was the son of Simon the Maccabee and nephew of Judah Maccabee, the hero of the Hanukkah story. John Hyrcanus was the first Jewish ruler to issue coins in his own name.

If you order one of our Hanukkah Lots or Jewish - Biblical Starter Sets, we will be happy to provide a coin identification lesson for your family over the telephone or instant messenger.


Seleukid Kingdom, Antiochus IV Epiphanes, 175 - 164 B.C.
Click for a larger photo From the extraordinary "Egyptianizing" coinage of Antiochus IV, celebrating his triumphs over the Ptolemaic Kingdom of Egypt by using a reverse type strongly associated with the Lagid dynasty, an eagle perched on a thunderbolt.

Antiochos IV assumed divine epithets, which no other Hellenistic king had done, such as Theos Epiphanes ("God Manifest") and after his defeat of Egypt, Nikephoros ("Bearer of Victory"). But his often eccentric behavior, capricious actions and even insanity led some of his contemporaries to call him Epimanes ("The Mad One"), a word play off of his title Epiphanes.

In 168 B.C., Antiochus IV ordered the Jews to worship Greek gods. The Temple in Jerusalem was seized and dedicated to Zeus. The Jews revolted and after three years of fighting, Judah Maccabee defeated the Seleukid army. Hanukkah, the Festival of Lights, commemorates the rededication of the Temple in 165 B.C. According to the Talmud, there was only enough consecrated olive oil to fuel the eternal flame in the Temple for one day. Miraculously, the oil burned for eight days, enough time to prepare and consecrate fresh oil.
GB69535. Bronze AE 27, Houghton-Lorber II 1414; BMC Seleucid p. 38, 45; SNG Spaer 981; SNG Cop 192; Svoronos 1417 (Antiochus III, occupied Egypt); HGC 9 644 (S-R1), F, weight 18.029 g, maximum diameter 26.5 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, obverse head of Isis wreathed with grain; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ ANTIOXOY ΘEOY EΠIΦANOYΣ, eagle standing right, wings closed; from the Butte College Foundation, ex Lindgren; $45.00 (39.15)

Seleukid Kingdom, Antiochus IV Epiphanes, 175 - 165 or 164 B.C.
Click for a larger photo Ptolemais was a maritime city of Galilee (Acts 21:7). It was originally Accho, but was renamed Ptolemais under the rule of Ptolemy Soter.

Antiochos IV assumed divine epithets, which no other Hellenistic king had done, such as Theos Epiphanes ("God Manifest") and after his defeat of Egypt, Nikephoros ("Bearer of Victory"). But his often eccentric behavior, capricious actions and even insanity led some of his contemporaries to call him Epimanes ("The Mad One"), a word play off of his title Epiphanes.

In 168 B.C., Antiochus IV ordered the Jews to worship Greek gods. The Temple in Jerusalem was seized and dedicated to Zeus. The Jews revolted and after three years of fighting, Judah Maccabee defeated the Seleukid army. Hanukkah, the Festival of Lights, commemorates the rededication of the Temple in 165 B.C. According to the Talmud, there was only enough consecrated olive oil to fuel the eternal flame in the Temple for one day. Miraculously, the oil burned for eight days, enough time to prepare and consecrate fresh oil.


GY69847. Bronze serrated AE 15, Houghton-Lorber II 1479; BMC Seleucid p. 38, 41; SNG Spaer 1130 ff.; Houghton CSE 791 ff.; Babelon Rois 572 ff.; HGC 9 726; SGCV II 6994, F, nice green patina, weight 2.676 g, maximum diameter 14.5 mm, die axis 45o, Ake Ptolemais mint, c. 173 - 168 B.C.; obverse diademed and radiate head of Antiochus right, A/B monogram behind, fillet border; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ ANTOXOY, Veiled and draped goddess (Hera or Demeter ) standing facing, long scepter or torch in right; from the Butte College Foundation, ex Lindgren; $45.00 (39.15)



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Catalog current as of Monday, March 30, 2015.
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Hanukkah