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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Gods, Non-Olympian| ▸ |Baal||View Options:  |  |  |   

Baal

Ba'al simply means 'Lord' in Phoenician and was used to describe many local gods. At first the name Ba'al was used by the Jews for their God, but as the struggle between religions developed, the name Ba'al was given up in Judaism. Over time Ba'al became synonymous with Beelzebub.


Macedonian Kingdom, Mazaios, Governor, 331 - 328 B.C., Babylon, Babylonia

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After the Persian satrap Mazaios surrendered Babylon to Alexander without a fight, Alexander retained him as governor.
SH43400. Silver double shekel, SNG Cop 260, SNG Berry 1456, BMC Arabia etc. p. 180, 1 var. (I on exergual line); Babelon Traitť 751 var. (wreath in ex); SGCV II 6140, Choice gVF, weight 17.130 g, maximum diameter 26.7 mm, die axis 45o, obverse BLTRZ (Baaltarz) in Aramaic behind, Baaltarz seated left on seat without back, himation over left shoulder and waist downward, lotus tipped scepter in right, left rests on his hip; reverse MZDI (Mazaios) in Aramaic above, lion walking left; scarce type; SOLD


Persian Empire, Tiribazos, Satrap of Cilicia, 388 - 380 B.C., Issos, Cilicia

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GS33197. Silver stater, SNGvA 5601 var. (ethnic spelling), gVF, weight 10.451 g, maximum diameter 22.2 mm, die axis 0o, Issos, Cilicia mint, 386 - 380 B.C.; obverse Ahura-Mazda, head right, body terminated by solar disk, holding wreath and lotus blossom; reverse Baal standing half-left, eagle in right, long scepter in left hand, IΣΣEΩN (sic) left, Aramaic TRIBZW right; ex KŁnker auction 143, lot 233 (misattributed as SNG France 418, price realized 800 Euro), areas of porosity, well centered and struck on a particularly full flan for the type; very rare; SOLD


Persian Empire, Mazaios, Satrap of Cilicia, 361 - 334 B.C., Tarsos, Cilicia

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Mazaios was the Persian satrap of Cilicia beginning about 361 BC and in about 345 B.C. he was also made satrap of Transeuphratesia (which included Syria and Judaea). In 331 BC, Mazaios was defeated by Alexander the Great at the Battle of Gaugamela, after which he fled to Babylon. Later that year Mazaios surrendered Babylon, the capital of the Persian Empire, to Alexander. For surrendering without a fight, Alexander appointed Mazaios governor of Babylon. He died in 328 B.C.
GS28915. Silver stater, Casabonne 2F, SNG Levante 100 var. (additional Aramaic letters lower reverse), SNG BnF 100 (no Aramaic N), Choice EF, great well-centered strike on very good metal, weight 10.966 g, maximum diameter 22.4 mm, die axis 135o, Tarsos (Tarsus, Mersin, Turkey) mint, 361 - 334 B.C.; obverse BLTRZ (Baaltarz) in Aramaic (read upward) behind, Baal of Tarsos enthroned half-left, nude to waist, himation around hips and legs, holding bunch of grapes, grain ear, and eagle in right hand, lotus tipped scepter vertical behind in left hand, Aramaic N lower left; reverse lion bringing down bull, attacking with teeth and claws, MZDI (=Mazdai) in Aramaic above, letters below, all within a circle of dots; SOLD


Persian Empire, Mazaios, Satrap of Cilicia, 361 - 334 B.C., Tarsos, Cilicia

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Mazaios was the Persian satrap of Cilicia beginning about 361 BC and in about 345 B.C. he was also made satrap of Transeuphratesia (which included Syria and Judaea). In 331 BC, Mazaios was defeated by Alexander the Great at the Battle of Gaugamela, after which he fled to Babylon. Later that year Mazaios surrendered Babylon, the capital of the Persian Empire, to Alexander. For surrendering without a fight, Alexander appointed Mazaios governor of Babylon. He died in 328 B.C.
SH26662. Silver stater, SGCV II 5649, EF, extraordinary sharp and bold strike, obverse and reverse slightly off-center, weight 11.010 g, maximum diameter 23.9 mm, die axis 0o, 361 - 334 B.C.; obverse BLTRZ (=Baaltarz) in Aramaic behind, Baal of Tarsos enthroned left, head facing, holding bunch of grapes, grain ear, and eagle in right, lotus headed scepter in left hand, M below throne, all within a circle of dots; reverse lion bringing down bull, attacking with teeth and claws, MZDI (=Mazdai) in Aramaic above, letters below, all within a circle of dots; this type is one of our favorites!; SOLD


Ptolemaic Kingdom, Cleopatra VII Thea Philopator, 51 - 30 B.C., Orthosia, Phoenicia

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This is an extremely rare issue known only from a few specimens.
SH03585. Bronze AE 23, RPC I 4502, SNG Cop 176, aF, weight 6.68 g, maximum diameter 22.5 mm, Phoenicia, Orthosia mint, 35 - 34 B.C.; obverse diademed head of Cleopatra right, star behind; reverse Baal of Orthosia in chariot pulled by to griffins to right, LΓ (Phoenician regnal year 3) in left field, OPΘΩCIEΩN in exergue; extremely rare; SOLD


Persian Empire, Tarkumuwa (Datames), Satrap of Cilicia & Cappadocia, c. 384 - 362 B.C., Tarsus, Cilicia

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Datames' enemies in Artaxerxes' court accused him, perhaps falsely, of intending to revolt against the Great King. Secretly warned, he then did, in fact, revolt, c. 370 B.C. The revolt appeared to be leading to a breakup of the entire western half of the empire into autonomous states. His own son's desertion to Artaxerxes was, however, the beginning of the end, which came when Datames was assassinated, c. 362 B.C.
SH56328. Silver stater, Moysey, Type 5, pl. 4, 40; SNG BnF 291; SNGvA 5943; SNG Cop 300, gVF, weight 10.350 g, maximum diameter 23.7 mm, die axis 0o, Tarsos (Tarsus, Mersin, Turkey) mint, c. 370 B.C.; obverse Aramaic: BALTRZ (Baal of Tarsos), Baaltars seated right, torso facing, eagle-tipped scepter in left, head of grain and bunch of grapes in right, to right thymiaterion, turreted city wall around; reverse on left, god Ana, nude standing right, pointing at Datames, who stands left in Greek attire, making submissive gesture, Aramaic: TRKMW (Tarkumuwa) and thymiaterion in center; all within a rectangular temple; SOLD


Macedonian Kingdom, Seleucus I as Satrap, 328 - 311 B.C., Babylon, Babylonia

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After the Persian satrap Mazaios surrendered Babylon to Alexander without a fight, Alexander retained him as governor. Alexander made Babylon his royal seat and established a mint to strike "Alexandrine" coinage, including massive quantities of his tetradrachms with a bust of Herakles on the obverse and Zeus AŽtophoros enthroned on the reverse. Alexandrine coinage was struck at many mints and circulated across Alexander's empire. At the same time, Babylon also struck local civic coinage, some in the name of Mazaeus. After Mazaeus death in 328 B.C., the satrap Seleukos I continued to strike local types in several denominations, all with Baal enthroned on the obverse and a standing lion on the reverse. This variety with a spear head control symbol is attributed to Seleukos.
GS87515. Silver double shekel, Nicolet-Pierre p. 289, 2; BMC Arabia p. 181, 4; SNG Cop -; Traitť -; Babelon Perses -, VF, thick overweight crowded flan, dark toned fields, minor encrustations, rev. light double strike, light marks and scratches, weight 20.114 g, maximum diameter 22.4 mm, die axis 45o, Mesopotamia, Babylon (Hillah, Iraq) mint, c. 328 - 323 B.C.; obverse Baaltarz enthroned left on seat without back, himation over left shoulder and around hips and legs, lotus tipped scepter vertical before him in right hand, left hand rests on his hip; reverse lion standing left, spear head left (control symbol) above; rare; SOLD


Macedonian Kingdom, Seleucus I Nikator as Satrap, 311 - 305 B.C., Babylon, Babylonia

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Seleukos (Seleucus) founded the Seleukid Empire and the Seleukid dynasty which ruled Syria until Pompey made it a Roman province in 63 B.C. Seleukos was never one of Alexander the Great's principal generals but he commanded the royal bodyguard during the Indian campaign. In the division of the empire after Alexander's death Seleukos did not receive a satrapy. Instead, he served under the regent Perdikkas until the latter's murder in 321 or 320. Seleukos was then appointed satrap of Babylonia. Five years later Antigonus Monophthalmus (the One-eyed) forced him to flee, but he returned with support from Ptolemy. He later added Persia and Media to his territory and defeated both Antigonus and Lysimachus. He was succeeded by his son Antiochus I.
GS91518. Silver stater, Houghton-Lorber 88.2a; Newell ESM 263; BMC Arabia p. 188, 43; Traite II, p. 487, 774; Weber 8202; HGC 9 67a , Choice F, well centered, old cabinet toning, light marks areas of light etching, tiny edge split, weight 13.518 g, maximum diameter 26.6 mm, die axis 90o, Mesopotamia, Babylon II (Hillah, Iraq) mint, c. 311 - 303 B.C.; obverse Baaltarz enthroned left on seat without back, himation over left shoulder and around hips and legs, lotus tipped scepter vertical before him in right hand, left hand rests on seat; reverse lion standing left, anchor (control symbol) above, nothing in exergue; from the Maxwell Hunt Collection, ex Hesperia Art; scarce; $700.00 (Ä0) ON RESERVE


Persian Empire, Mazaios, Satrap of Cilicia, 361 - 334 B.C., Tarsos, Cilicia

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This type is one of our favorites.
SH08014. Silver stater, SNG Levante 106; Casabonne 2C; SNG BnF 350 var. (TN vice NT), gEF, superb nearly mint state, extraordinary sharp and bold strike, slightly irregular flan, weight 10.84 g, maximum diameter 25.1 mm, die axis 45o, Tarsos (Tarsus, Mersin, Turkey) mint, 361 - 334 B.C.; obverse BLTRZ (=Baaltarz) in Aramaic behind, Baal of Tarsos enthroned left, head facing, BLTRZ (Baaltars) in Aramaic (read upward) behind; bunch of grapes, grain ear, and eagle in right hand; lotus headed scepter vertical behind in left hand, Aramaic letters NT lower left and M below throne; reverse lion bringing down bull, attacking with teeth and claws, MZDI (Mazaios) in Aramaic (read right to left) above, Aramaic monogram below; SOLD


Persian Empire, Mazaios, Satrap of Cilicia, 361 - 334 B.C., Tarsos, Cilicia

Click for a larger photo
Mazaios was the Persian satrap of Cilicia beginning about 361 B.C. and in about 345 B.C. he was also made satrap of Transeuphratesia (which included Syria and Judaea). In 331 B.C., Mazaios was defeated by Alexander the Great at the Battle of Gaugamela, after which he fled to Babylon. Later that year Mazaios surrendered Babylon, the capital of the Persian Empire, to Alexander. For surrendering without a fight, Alexander appointed Mazaios governor of Babylon. He died in 328 B.C.
SH43358. Silver stater, Casabonne 2D, SNG Levante supp. 20 var. (Aramaic M under throne), SNG BnF 106 var. (same and monogram lower rev.), gVF, cleaning scratches, weight 10.800 g, maximum diameter 23.4 mm, die axis 180o, Tarsos (Tarsus, Mersin, Turkey) mint, 361/360 - 334 B.C.; obverse BLTRZ (Baaltars) in Aramaic (read upward) behind, Baal of Tarsos enthroned left, head facing, nude to the waist, himation around hips and legs; bunch of grapes, grain ear, and eagle in right hand; lotus headed scepter vertical behind in left hand; Aramaic NT lower left, nothing below throne; reverse lion bringing down bull, attacking with teeth and claws, MZDI (Mazaios) in Aramaic (read right to left) above; SOLD




  




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Baal