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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Themes & Provenance ▸ Gods, Non-Olympian ▸ DioscuriView Options:  |  |  | 

Dioscuri

The Disocuri were Castor and Pollux (or Polydeuces), the twin sons of Leda and brothers of Helen of Troy. The twins shared the same mother but had different fathers. Pollux, the son of Zeus, was immortal but Castor was mortal. When Castor died, Pollux asked to let him share his own immortality with his twin to keep them together. They were transformed into the Gemini constellation and the two spend alternate days on Olympus (as gods) and in Hades (as deceased mortals). The pair were regarded as the patrons of sailors, to whom they appeared as St. Elmo's fire.


Roman Republic, Dictatorship of Julius Caesar, Mn. Cordius Rufus, c. 46 B.C.

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The Cordia home, Tusculum, was a center of worship for the Dioscuri. The reverse is a clever play on the moneyer's name and may also compliment Julius Caesar who claimed descent from Venus. The particular design of Venus may derive from a statue placed in the temple of Venus Genetrix in the year of issue.
RR88400. Silver denarius, Sydenham 976, Crawford 463/1a, RSC I Cordia 2a, BMCRR I Rome 4037, RBW Collection 1606, Sear CRI 63, SRCV I 440, gF, attractive iridescent toning, off center, some marks, weight 3.586 g, maximum diameter 20.0 mm, die axis 15o, Rome mint, c. 46 B.C.; obverse RVFVS III VIR downward behind, jugate heads of Dioscuri right, wearing laureate pilei surmounted by stars; reverse MN CORDIVS (MN ligate) downward on right, Venus standing half left, scales in right hand, transverse scepter in left hand, Cupid at shoulder; ex The Time Machine; $180.00 (153.00)


Kingdom of Chalkis, Coele Syria, Ptolemaios, 85 - 40 B.C.

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Ptolemaios son of Mennaios (also known as Ptolemy I), an Ituraean Arab dynast, established the Kingdom of Chalkis, c. 85 B.C., during the collapse of the Seleukid Empire. The kingdom, with its capitol at Chalcis sub Libano at the foot of Antilibanus, included Heliopolis, the valley of the Marsyas, and the mountainous region of Ituraea. In 64 B.C., he bribed Pompey the Great to forgo annexing his kingdom into the new Roman province of Syria and to allow him to continue ruling his territory as Tetrarch. Ptolemaios was succeeded by his son Lysanias, who was put to death by Marc Antony for supporting Mattathias Antigonus over Herod the Great. Antony gave the tiny kingdom of Chalkis to Cleopatra as a gift.
RP85946. Bronze AE 19, Herman 1, SNG Cop 413, Lindgren 1218, Cohen DCA 468, HGC 9 1439 (S), BMC Phoenicia p. 203, 18 corr. (Tripolis), VF, well centered and struck on a tight flan, attractive style, porous, weight 6.219 g, maximum diameter 18.2 mm, die axis 0o, Chalkis sub Libano mint, 73 - 72 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Zeus (or tetrarch) right; reverse the Dioscuri, Castor and Pollux, standing facing, heads confronted, star above each head, each wearing a petasos and Roman military garb, spear in outer hand, inner hand on his hip, LMΣ (Seleukid era year 240) downward on right; $125.00 (106.25)


Tetrarchy of Chalkis, Coele Syria, Ptolemaios, 85 - 40 B.C.

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Ptolemaios son of Mennaios (also known as Ptolemy I), an Ituraean Arab dynast, established the Kingdom of Chalkis, c. 85 B.C., during the collapse of the Seleukid Empire. The kingdom, with its capitol at Chalcis sub Libano at the foot of Antilibanus, included Heliopolis, the valley of the Marsyas, and the mountainous region of Ituraea. In 64 B.C., he bribed Pompey the Great to forgo annexing his kingdom into the new Roman province of Syria and to allow him to continue ruling his territory as Tetrarch. Ptolemaios was succeeded by his son Lysanias, who was put to death by Marc Antony for supporting Mattathias Antigonus over Herod the Great. Antony gave the tiny kingdom of Chalkis to Cleopatra as a gift.
GY86696. Bronze AE 19, Herman 4; SNG Cop 414; BMC Galatia p. 280, 5; Lindgren I A2134B; HGC 9 1440 (S), VF, green patina, earthen deposits, light marks and scratches, high points bare copper, weight 3.506 g, maximum diameter 18.5 mm, die axis 0o, Chalkis sub Libano mint, 63 - 62 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Zeus right; reverse the Dioscuri standing facing, center legs crossed, heads turned confronted, each leaning on spear in outer hand, LB (year 2 Pompeian Era) ∆ / ΠTOΛEMA right, TETPAPΠX left, APXE below, all within wreath; ex J.S. Wagner Collection; $125.00 (106.25)


Kingdom of Chalkis, Coele Syria, Ptolemaios, 85 - 40 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Ptolemaios son of Mennaios (also known as Ptolemy I), an Ituraean Arab dynast, established the Kingdom of Chalkis, c. 85 B.C., during the collapse of the Seleukid Empire. The kingdom, with its capitol at Chalcis sub Libano at the foot of Antilibanus, included Heliopolis, the valley of the Marsyas, and the mountainous region of Ituraea. In 64 B.C., he bribed Pompey the Great to forgo annexing his kingdom into the new Roman province of Syria and to allow him to continue ruling his territory as Tetrarch. Ptolemaios was succeeded by his son Lysanias, who was put to death by Marc Antony for supporting Mattathias Antigonus over Herod the Great. Antony gave the tiny kingdom of Chalkis to Cleopatra as a gift.
GB88239. Bronze AE 20, Herman 9.a (same countermark), Lindgren III 1232 (same countermark), HGC 9 1445 (R1), SNG Cop -, SNG Mnchen -, BMC Galatia -, aF, well centered, bumps and marks, corrosion, rough, weight 4.162 g, maximum diameter 20.4 mm, die axis 0o, Chalkis ad Libanon mint, 85 - 40 B.C.; obverse bust of Athena right, draped, wearing crested Corinthian helmet; countermark: male head right in round punch; reverse Dioskouroi standing facing each other, each holding a spear; monograms around; ex FORVM (2000), ex Phil DeVicchi Collection; rare; $125.00 (106.25)


Greco-Baktrian Kingdom, Eukratides I the Great, c. 170 - 145 B.C.

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Eucratides I the Great came to the throne by overthrowing the dynasty of Euthydemus I and became one of the most important Greco-Bactrian kings. Eucratides had a vast and prestigious coinage, suggesting a rule of considerable importance. He fought against the Indo-Greek kings, the easternmost Hellenistic rulers in northwestern India, temporarily holding territory as far as the Indus, until he was finally defeated and pushed back to Bactria. Justin ends his account of Eucratides' life by claiming he was murdered on his way back from India by his own son, who hated his father so much that he dragged his dead body behind his chariot.
WA88316. Bronze square 4 units, Bopearachchi Serie 19i, Mitchiner IGIS 190d, SNG ANS 551, SNG Cop 280, HGC 12 146 (S), aVF, dark patina, highlighting earthen deposits, weight 9.168 g, maximum diameter 30.2 mm, die axis 0o, c. 170 - 145 B.C.; obverse helmeted bust of king right, Boiotian helmet crested and ornamented with ear and horn of a bull, BAΣIΛEΩΣ (king) upward on left, MEΓAΛOY (great) above, EYKPATI∆OY (Eukratides) below; reverse the Dioscuri on horseback galloping right, each holding palm frond and couched spear, ΓΩ monogram lower right, Karosthi legend: Maharajasa Evukratidasa (of King Eukratides, the Great) above and below; ex Ancient Imports; scarce; $120.00 (102.00)


Kingdom of Chalkis, Coele Syria, Ptolemaios, 85 - 40 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Ptolemaios son of Mennaios (also known as Ptolemy I), an Ituraean Arab dynast, established the Kingdom of Chalkis, c. 85 B.C., during the collapse of the Seleukid Empire. The kingdom, with its capitol at Chalcis sub Libano at the foot of Antilibanus, included Heliopolis, the valley of the Marsyas, and the mountainous region of Ituraea. In 64 B.C., he bribed Pompey the Great to forgo annexing his kingdom into the new Roman province of Syria and to allow him to continue ruling his territory as Tetrarch. Ptolemaios was succeeded by his son Lysanias, who was put to death by Marc Antony for supporting Mattathias Antigonus over Herod the Great. Antony gave the tiny kingdom of Chalkis to Cleopatra as a gift.
GY88119. Bronze AE 19, Herman 1, SNG Cop 413, Lindgren 1218, Cohen DCA 468, HGC 9 1439 (S), BMC Phoenicia p. 203, 18 corr. (Tripolis), aVF, dark patina, compact flan, scratches, light corrosion, earthen deposits, weight 7.051 g, maximum diameter 19.2 mm, die axis 0o, Chalkis sub Libano mint, 73 - 72 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Zeus (or tetrarch) right; reverse the Dioscuri, Castor and Pollux, standing facing, heads confronted, star above each head, each wearing a petasos and Roman military garb, spear in outer hand, inner hand on his hip, LMΣ (Seleukid era year 240) downward on right; $100.00 (85.00)


Seleukid Kingdom, Antiochus II Theos, 261 - 246 B.C.

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Antiochus II Theos was the son of Antiochus I and Princess Stratonice, the daughter of Demetrius Poliorcetes. He inherited a state of war with Egypt and while he was thus occupied, his satraps in Parthia and Bactria declared independence. To make peace with Egypt and to seal the treaty, Antiochus repudiated his wife Laodice I, exiled her to Ephesus, and married Ptolemy II's daughter Berenice. Antiochus later left Berenice and their infant son Antiochus, to live again with Laodice. Laodice poisoned him, had Berenice and her infant son murdered, and proclaimed her son Seleucus II as King.
GY86473. Bronze AE 20, Houghton-Lorber 565(1)a, SNG Cop 87, Newell WSM 1313, HGC 9 254 (R2), BMC Seleucid -, F, smoothing, porous, scratches and marks, beveled obverse edge, weight 7.039 g, maximum diameter 20.3 mm, die axis 0o, Tarsos (Tarsus, Mersin, Turkey) mint, 261 - 246 B.C.; obverse the Dioscuri galloping on horseback right, spears raised in right hands; reverse Athena Promachos standing right, brandishing javelin in right hand, shield in left hand, anchor with flukes left below (off flan), BAΣIΛEΩΣ upward on left, ANTIOXOY upward on right; rare; $90.00 (76.50)


Kingdom of Chalkis, Coele Syria, Ptolemaios, 85 - 40 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Ptolemaios son of Mennaios (also known as Ptolemy I), an Ituraean Arab dynast, established the Kingdom of Chalkis, c. 85 B.C., during the collapse of the Seleukid Empire. The kingdom, with its capitol at Chalcis sub Libano at the foot of Antilibanus, included Heliopolis, the valley of the Marsyas, and the mountainous region of Ituraea. In 64 B.C., he bribed Pompey the Great to forgo annexing his kingdom into the new Roman province of Syria and to allow him to continue ruling his territory as Tetrarch. Ptolemaios was succeeded by his son Lysanias, who was put to death by Marc Antony for supporting Mattathias Antigonus over Herod the Great. Antony gave the tiny kingdom of Chalkis to Cleopatra as a gift.
GB87424. Bronze AE 20, Herman 1, SNG Cop 413, Lindgren 1218, Cohen DCA 468, HGC 9 1439 (S), BMC Phoenicia p. 203, 18 corr. (Tripolis), Choice F, attractive green patina with highlighting red earthen deposits, slight porosity, weight 7.164 g, maximum diameter 19.5 mm, die axis 0o, Chalkis sub Libano mint, 73 - 72 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Zeus (or tetrarch) right; reverse the Dioscuri, Castor and Pollux, standing facing, heads confronted, star above each head, each wearing a petasos and Roman military garb, spear in outer hand, inner hand on his hip, LMΣ (Seleukid era year 240) downward on right; $90.00 (76.50)


Seleukid Kingdom, Antiochus II Theos, 261 - 246 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Antiochus II Theos was the son of Antiochus I and Princess Stratonice, the daughter of Demetrius Poliorcetes. He inherited a state of war with Egypt and while he was thus occupied, his satraps in Parthia and Bactria declared independence. To make peace with Egypt and to seal the treaty, Antiochus repudiated his wife Laodice I, exiled her to Ephesus, and married Ptolemy II's daughter Berenice. Antiochus later left Berenice and their infant son Antiochus, to live again with Laodice. Laodice poisoned him, had Berenice and her infant son murdered, and proclaimed her son Seleucus II as King.
GB71666. Bronze AE 20, Houghton-Lorber 565(2)b, SNG Spaer 348A, Newell WSM 1312, HGC 9 254 (R2), SNG Cop 87 var. (no monogram), BMC Seleucid -; c/m: Houghton-Lorber -, aVF, oval flan, edge crack, light encrustation and corrosion, weight 4.254 g, maximum diameter 19.5 mm, die axis 315o, Tarsos (Tarsus, Mersin, Turkey) mint, 261 - 246 B.C.; obverse the Dioscuri galloping on horseback right, spears raised in right hands; reverse Athena Promachos standing right, brandishing javelin in right hand, shield in left hand, anchor with flukes left below, BAΣIΛEΩΣ in upward line on left, ANTIOXOY in upward line on right, monogram (control) inner left, countermark: ΠA monogram in a square punch; rare; $45.00 (38.25)







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Catalog current as of Tuesday, February 19, 2019.
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Dioscuri