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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Themes & Provenance ▸ Gods, Non-Olympian ▸ VestaView Options:  |  |  | 

Vesta

Vesta was originally a household spirit. Later she was personified as the goddess of the hearth and given the stature of her Greek equivalent, Hestia. In the temple of Vesta her flame was kept alive by Vestal Virgins.


Lucilla, Augusta c. 164 - 182 A.D., Wife of Lucius Verus

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Vesta was originally a household spirit. Later she was personified as the goddess of the hearth and given the stature of her Greek equivalent, Hestia. In the temple of Vesta her flame was kept alive by Vestal Virgins.
RB79847. Orichalcum sestertius, BMCRE IV MA1178, RIC III MA1779, Cohen III 94 corr. (torch for palladium), SRCV II 5510, Hunter III -, aVF, well centered, corrosion, weight 24.955 g, maximum diameter 29.5 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 164 - 166 A.D.; obverse LVCILLAE AVG - ANTONINI AVG F, Draped bust right, hair waved and in a chignon lown on back of head; reverse VESTA, Vesta standing left, flaming column alter at feet on left, simpulum in right hand, palladium in left hand sloped at shoulder in left, S - C (senatus consulto) flanking across lower half of field; $195.00 (173.55)


Vespasian, 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D.

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Vesta was the Roman goddess of the hearth (home) and, derived from that, was important for the security of the state (homeland). Vespasian may have been especially devoted to Vesta because he was brought up by his grandmother in home that he loved and appreciated. Suetonius wrote, "He was brought up under the care of his paternal grandmother Tertulla on her estates at Cosa. Therefore, even after he became emperor he used constantly to visit the home of his infancy, where the manor house was kept in its original condition, since he did not wish to miss anything which he was wont to see there; and he was so devoted to his grandmother's memory that on religious and festival days he always drank from a little silver cup that had belonged to her." With his coinage dedicated to Vesta, Vespasian expressed his respect for home and hearth, and his dedication to security of the state.
SL85101. Silver denarius, RIC II, part 1, 50; RSC II 574; BMCRE II 71; BnF III 55; SRCV I 2316, ANACS VF35 (5163464), Rome mint, 72 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES VESP AVG P M COS IIII, laureate head right; reverse Vesta standing left, simpulum in right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, VES-TA across field; certified (slabbed) by ANACS; $160.00 (142.40)


Julia Mamaea, Augusta 13 March 222 - February or March 235 A.D.

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Vesta was originally a household spirit. Later she was personified as the goddess of the hearth and given the stature of her Greek equivalent, Hestia. In the temple of Vesta her flame was kept alive by Vestal Virgins.
SH66879. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC IV 708, BMCRE VI 389, Cohen IV 83, SRCV II 8236, VF, weight 24.538 g, maximum diameter 30.9 mm, die axis 315o, Rome mint, 226 A.D.; obverse IVLIA MAMAEA AVGVSTA, diademed and draped bust right; reverse VESTA S C, Vesta standing half-left, veiled head left, palladium in right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand; $140.00 (124.60)


Julia Mamaea, Augusta 13 March 222 - February or March 235 A.D.

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The palladium, a small figure of Minerva (Pallas Athena) holding a spear and shield, had a mythological origin from Troy. Troy was believed to be safe from foreign enemies as long as the palladium remained within the city walls. But Odysseus and Diomedes stole the image and soon after the Greeks took the city. The palladium was later taken by Aeneas to Rome where for centuries it was kept in the temple of Vesta in the Forum. In Late Antiquity, it was rumored that Constantine had taken the palladium to Constantinople and buried it under the Column of Constantine.
RS77075. Silver denarius, RIC IV 360; RSC III 81; BMCRE VI p. 152, 381; SRCV II 8217, VF, well centered, light marks, weight 2.893 g, maximum diameter 19.3 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 226 A.D.; obverse IVLIA MAMAEA AVG, diademed and draped bust right; reverse VESTA, Vesta standing half-left, veiled head left, palladium in right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand; $110.00 (97.90)


Faustina Sr., Augusta 25 February 138 - Early 141, Wife of Antoninus Pius

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The palladium, a small figure of Minerva (Pallas Athena) holding a spear and shield, had a mythological origin from Troy. Troy was believed to be safe from foreign enemies as long as the palladium remained within the city walls. But Odysseus and Diomedes stole the image and soon after the Greeks took the city. The palladium was later taken by Aeneas to Rome where for centuries it was kept in the temple of Vesta in the Forum. In Late Antiquity, it was rumored that Constantine had taken the palladium to Constantinople and buried it under the Column of Constantine.
RB77887. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC III AP1125, BMCRE IV AP1521, Cohen II 113, SRCV II 4618, F, full circle strike on obverse, bumps and marks, light corrosion, weight 24.809 g, maximum diameter 32.4 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, posthumous, 147 - 161 A.D.; obverse DIVA FAVSTINA, draped bust right, pearls in hair and hair in elaborate bun on top; reverse AVGVSTA, Vesta standing half left, long torch in right hand, palladium with shield in left hand, S - C (senatus consulto) flanking across field below center; from the Butte College Foundation, ex Lindgren; $90.00 (80.10)


Domitian, 13 September 81 - 18 September 96 A.D.

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Vesta was originally a household spirit. She was later personified as the goddess of the hearth and given the stature of her Greek equivalent, Hestia. In the temple of Vesta her flame was kept alive by Vestal Virgins.
RS85544. Silver denarius, RIC II, part 1, Vespasian 1087 (C2); RSC II 378; BMCRE II 262; BnF III 233; Hunter I V20; SRCV I 2641, F, well struck on a tight flan, toned, some very light marks, light deposits on reverse, weight 2.951 g, maximum diameter 17.6 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, as caesar, 79 A.D.; obverse CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS COS VI, laureate head right; reverse PRINCEPS IVVENTVTIS (the first of youths), Vesta seated left, palladium in right hand, long scepter transverse in left hand; from the Lucas Harsh collection; $70.00 (62.30)


Salonina, Augusta 254 - c. September 268 A.D.

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Vesta began as a household spirit and was later personified as the goddess of the hearth and given the stature of her Greek equivalent, Hestia. In the temple of Vesta her flame was kept alive by Vestal Virgins.
RS73646. Silver antoninianus, Gbl MIR 859b (Viminacium), RIC V J39 (Rome), RSC IV 137, Hunter IV J1 (Rome), SRCV III 10663 (Rome), VF, broad flan, good metal for the reign, slightly off-center, some porosity, flan crack, weight 4.034 g, maximum diameter 23.7 mm, die axis 225o, Rome mint, c. 256 - 257 A.D.; obverse CORN SALONINA AVG, draped bust right, wearing stephane, hair in ridges and plait looped below ear and up the back of head, thin crescent behind shoulders; reverse VESTA, Vesta standing left, patera in right hand, long transverse scepter in left hand; ex Harlan J Berk; $50.00 (44.50)







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Catalog current as of Wednesday, September 20, 2017.
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Vesta