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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Medieval & Modern Coins ▸ CyprusView Options:  |  |  | 

Coins of Cyprus

Salamis(?), Cyprus, Pnytagoras(?), c. 351 - 332 B.C.(?)

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CNG noted of their similar coin, "The coins of Salamis do feature turreted portraits of Aphrodite, but other than that and the possibility of rendering the monogram as ΠN, there is little to confirm the identification of this coin." We have doubts about the attribution but don't have anything better to suggest.
GA85913. Silver hemiobol, Unpublished in references, cf. CNG e-auction 143 (12 Jul 06), lot 84 (caduceus to right of monogram on reverse), aVF, uneven toning, porous, scratches, weight 0.245 g, maximum diameter 6.8 mm, die axis 315o, Salamis(?) mint, c. 350 - 330 B.C.(?); obverse turreted female head (Aphrodite?) right; reverse ΠN(?) monogram, within linear circle; extremely rare; $170.00 (144.50)


Ptolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemy X Alexander I and Kleopatra Berenike, 101 - 88 B.C.

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Alexander was the son of Ptolemy VIII and Cleopatra III. In 110 B.C., his mother deposed his brother Ptolemy IX and he became king with his mother as co-regent. In 109 B.C., Ptolemy IX took back the throne but in 107 B.C. Alexander again became king with his mother as co-regent. In 101 B.C., he had his mother killed, and then ruled with his niece and wife, Berenice III. When he died, Ptolemy IX regained the throne. When Ptolemy IX died, Ptolemy X's wife Berenice III took the throne for six months.
GP85356. Bronze didrachm, Svoronos 1712, Weiser 181, Cox Curium 113, SNG Cop -, Malter -, Noeske -, Hosking -, VF, edge crack, beveled obverse, flan casting sprues, weight 20.056 g, maximum diameter 35.2 mm, die axis 0o, Cyprus, Paphos mint, c. 100 - 90 B.C.; obverse horned head of Zeus-Ammon right, wearing tainia; reverse ΠTOΛEMAIOY BAΣIΛEΩΣ, two eagles standing left on thunderbolt, heads left, wings closed, no symbol; $125.00 (106.25)


Paphos, Cyprus, c. 350 - 250 B.C.

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Doves are a symbol of peace but also a romantic symbol of love. The dove relates to romance because Greek mythology associated the small, white bird with Aphrodite, the goddess of love. Aphrodite's jewel-encrusted, golden chariot was drawn through the sky by a team of doves.
GB85968. Bronze AE 19, apparently unpublished; BMC Cyprus p. lxxiii & pl. xxii, 6; Bank of Cyprus -; Tziambazis -, SNG Cop -, Lindgren -; et al. -, F, rough, corrosion, edge splits, weight 5.241 g, maximum diameter 19.3 mm, die axis 270o, Paphos mint, c. 350 - 250 B.C.; obverse head of Aphrodite right, wearing stephane; reverse dove standing right; the only specimen of the type known to Forum; $90.00 (76.50)


Crusaders, Kingdom of Cyprus, James I, 1382 - 1398

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The Parliament of Cyprus named James king while he was captive in Genoa. To gain his release James agreed to new privileges for Genoese merchants and accepted Genoese sovereignty over the captured city of Famagusta, something that no previous king had conceded. Until he was released, Cyprus was governed by 12 nobles. Some of them opposed his return. In April 1385, James returned to Cyprus and was welcomed at Nicosia with great enthusiasm. He was crowned in May 1385 in Saint Sophia Cathedral. After his crowning, his opponents were arrested and punished. He was crowned King of Jerusalem in 1389. In 1393, Leo VI of Armenia died, and James assumed the title of King of Armenia. He was formally given the title in 1396. That kingdom was by now reduced to the city of Korikos, which had been in Cypriot hands since its conquest by Peter I of Cyprus. Upon his death, James was succeeded by his son Janus.
ME85300. Billon denier, Malloy Crusaders 113a; Metcalf Crusades 797; Schlumberger VII 9, aVF, toned, light corrosion, edge crack, tiny hole, legends difficult to read as usual for the type, weight 0.743 g, maximum diameter 15.9 mm, die axis 180o, Nicosia mint, May 1385 - 9 Sep 1398; obverse + IAQVE ROI DE, Lion of Cyprus rampant left; reverse + IERV3ALEm D, cross patte; ex C. Subak (Chicago, Sep 1975); $80.00 (68.00)







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REFERENCES

Lambros, P. Coins of the Medieval Kingdom of Cyprus. (Vienna, 1873).
Malloy, A., I. Preston, & A. Seltman. Coins of the Crusader States, 2nd Edition. (New York, 2004).
Metcalf, D. Coinage of the Crusaders and the Latin East in the Ashmolean Museum Oxford. (London, 1995).
Metcalf, D. The Silver Coinage of Cyprus, 1285-1382. (Nicosia, 1996).
Michaelidou, L. & E. Zapiti. Coins of Cyprus. From the Collection of the Bank of Cyprus Cultural Foundation. (Nicosia, 2008).
Neumann, J. Kupfermnzen. (Prague, 1858).
Schlumberger, G. Numismatique de l'Orient latin. (1878; Supplement 1882; reprinted: Graz, 1954).
Sothebys. The John J. Slocum Collection of Coins of the Crusades. Catalog of public auction, 6 March 1997. London.
Tziambazis, E. A Catalogue of the Coins of Cyprus (from 560 B.C. to 1571 A.D.). (Larnaca, 2002).

Catalog current as of Sunday, November 19, 2017.
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Cypriot Coins