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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Medieval & Modern Coins ▸ FranceView Options:  |  |  |   

Coins of France

Anglo-Gallic, Henry VI de Lancastre, King of France and England, 1422 - 1453, The Annunciation

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The obverse depicts the Annunciation, the announcement by the angel Gabriel to the Virgin Mary that she would be the mother of Jesus, the Son of God, marking his Incarnation.

This coin was struck at Dijon, a rare mint for the issue, which was minted in nine cities across France.

In 1422, the year old king of England inherited the French throne through his mad grandfather Charles VI of France; the iconography of this type represents the unification of the two nations. Ten years later Joan of Arc would make an appearance which would eventually loosen the English grip on France until by 1436 only Normandy and part of Maine remained in Henry's control.
SH79998. Gold Salut D'or, Schneider 102, Elias 268c, Duplessy 443, Lafaurie 447, gVF, weight 3.468 g, maximum diameter 27.4 mm, die axis 0o, Dijon mint, 2nd issue, 6 Sep 1423 - 1436; obverse vernicle, hENRICVS: DEI: GRA: FRACORV: AGLI: REX (Henry, by the grace of God, King of the Franks and English), double saltire stops, Virgin Mary, behind Arms of France, facing Angel Gabriel in profile left behind quartered Arms of France and England, light of God above AVE downward on scroll between them, within beaded circle; reverse vernicle, XPC'*VIHCIT'*XPC'*REGNAT'*XPC'*ImPERAT'* (Christ conquers, Christ reigns, Christ commands), mullet stops, central Latin cross, fleur de lis to left, lion to right, h below, all within tressure of ten arcs, fleur de lis on cusps, all within linear and beaded circle; this is a legend variety where Z is absent after FRACORV; very rare; SOLD


France, Charles V the Wise, 1364 - 1380

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As a young prince, Charles V the Wise received the province of Dauphiné to rule; thereafter, all heirs apparent of France bore the title of Dauphin until coronation. Charles became regent of France when his father John II was captured by the English at the Battle of Poitiers. The nobility rebelled after he raised taxes to pay the ransom. Charles overcame the rebellions, but to liberate his father, he had to conclude the Treaty of Brétigny in 1360, in which he abandoned large portions of south-western France to England and promised a huge ransom. After Charles became king, his skillful management allowed him to replenish the treasury and restore the prestige of the House of Valois. He established the first permanent army paid with regular wages, which liberated the French populace from the companies of routiers who plundered the country when not employed. The French Army turned the tide of the Hundred Years' War, reconquering almost all the territories ceded to the English in 1360. He was succeeded by his son Charles VI the Mad, whose disastrous reign allowed the English to regain control of large parts of France.

On April 20, 1365, it was decreed in the name of the king Charles V the manufacture of the new gold francs known as francs à pied (franc on foot) with the value of twenty sols tournois (one livre tournois). This coin, lighter than the franc à cheval (franc on horseback), weighed 3.824 grams and was struck to the standard of 64 pieces to the gold mark.
SH84617. Gold franc à pied, Duplessy 360, Ciani 457, Lafaurie 371, Friedberg 284, aEF, excellent centering, die wear, bumps and scratches, weight 3.823 g, maximum diameter 28.9 mm, die axis 270o, no date, after 20 April 1365; obverse + KAROLVS x DI x GR - FRAnCORV x REX (Charles, by the grace of God, king of the Franks), crowned king standing facing under Gothic dais, wearing a coat of arms fleur-de-lis over coat of mail, sword in right hand, hand of justice scepter in left hand, pattern of small fleurs-de-lis in fields; reverse + XPC * VInCIT * XPC * REGnAT * XPC * IMPERAT (Christ conquers, Christ reigns, Christ commands), cross fleurée quatrilobe at center, fleur-de-lis in 1st and 4th quarters, crown in 2nd and 3rd quarters, all within quadrilobe, fleurs-de-lis in spandrels; SOLD


France, Louis XVI, 10 May 1774 - 4 September 1791 A.D.

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Louis XVI, born Louis-Auguste, was the last King of France and Navarre before the French Revolution; during which he was also known as Louis Capet. In 1765, at the death of his father, Louis, Dauphin of France, son and heir apparent of Louis XV of France, Louis-Auguste became the new Dauphin. Upon his grandfather's death on 10 May 1774, he became King of France and Navarre, which he remained until 4 September 1791, when he received the title of King of the French until his suspension on 10 August 1792. Louis XVI was guillotined on 21 January 1793.

The Louis d'or (20 francs) under Louis XVI was minted between 1785 and 1792 and had a dimension of 23 mm, and a weight of 7.6490 g, a fineness of 0.917, and gold content of 0.2255 troy oz.
SH84615. Gold louis d'or, Duplessy 1707, Ciani 2183, Gadoury 361, Krause KM 591.5, Friedberg 475, Choice EF, mint luster, light marks, weight 7.663 g, maximum diameter 24.3 mm, die axis 180o, Lyon mint, 1786, 1st issue; obverse LUD. XVI. D. G. FR. - ET NAV. REX (LVDOVICVS XIII DEI GRATIA FRANCIAE ET NAVARRAE REX "Louis XIII by the grace of God king of France and of Navarre"), head of Louis XVI left, DUVIV (engraver B. Duvivier) on truncation, bee (sign of the mintmaster Jean-Claude Gabet) below; reverse CHRS. REGN. VINC. IMPER 1786 (CHRISTVS REGNAT VINCIT IMPERAT "Christ reigns, conquers and commands"), crowned arms of France and Navarre, D (Lyon mintmark) below, eagle head left (symbol of engraver Jean Humbert Bernavon) before date; SOLD


France, Louis XVI, 10 May 1774 - 4 September 1791 A.D.

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Louis XVI, born Louis-Auguste, was the last King of France and Navarre before the French Revolution; during which he was also known as Louis Capet. In 1765, at the death of his father, Louis, Dauphin of France, son and heir apparent of Louis XV of France, Louis-Auguste became the new Dauphin. Upon his grandfather's death on 10 May 1774, he became King of France and Navarre, which he remained until 4 September 1791, when he received the title of King of the French until his suspension on 10 August 1792. Louis XVI was guillotined on 21 January 1793.

The Louis d'or (20 francs) under Louis XVI was minted between 1785 and 1792 and had a dimension of 23 mm, and a weight of 7.6490 g, a fineness of 0.917, and gold content of 0.2255 troy oz.
SH85376. Gold louis d'or, Duplessy 1707, Ciani 2183, Gadoury 361, Krause KM 591.1, Friedberg 475, gVF, luster, light marks and scratches, flan adjustment marks on reverse, weight 7.564 g, maximum diameter 23.6 mm, die axis 180o, Paris mint, 1786; obverse LUD. XVI. D. G. FR. - ET NAV. REX (LVDOVICVS XIII DEI GRATIA FRANCIAE ET NAVARRAE REX - Louis XIII by the grace of God king of France and of Navarre), head of Louis XVI left, DUVIV (engraver B. Duvivier) on truncation, heron standing left (sign of the mintmaster Jean Dupeyron de la Cosre) below; reverse CHRS. REGN. VINC. IMPER 1786 (CHRISTVS REGNAT VINCIT IMPERAT - Christ reigns, conquers and commands), crowned arms of France and Navarre, A (Paris mintmark) below, lyre (symbol of mint official F. Bernier) before date; SOLD


France, Louis XII, 8 April 1498 - 31 December 1514

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To marry Anne of Brittany and absorb Brittany into France, Louis claimed his wife Joan of France was physically malformed and unable to consummate the marriage. Joan produced witnesses to Louis' boast of having "mounted my wife three or four times during the night." In a decision predetermined by politics, the marriage was annulled. After Anne died, Louis married Mary Tudor, the sister of Henry VIII, King of England. Louis had no living sons; he was desperate to produce an heir. He died less than three months after he married Mary, reputedly worn out by bedchamber exertions.
SL54549. Gold Ecu, Duplessy 647, NGC XF 40, Saint Lô mint, obverse crown, LVDOVICVS : DEI : GRA : FRANCORVM : REX, crowned arms of France, sun above, pellet mint mark at 19th position on inner border; reverse crown, XPS : VINCIT : XPS : REGNAT : XPS : IMPERAT, cross fleurée (arms ending in lis) with pellet inside quatrafoil in the center, pellet mint mark at 19th position on inner border; SOLD


France, Provincial, Duchy of Normandie, William the Conqueror, 1035 - 1087, In the Name of William Rufus(?)

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There are two varieties of this denier, one with RICAR above the pediment (Legros 336) and the other with two W's (Legros 337, Dumas and Legros list only one specimen, in the Brussels Coin Cabinet). These two types were struck in the reign of William the Conqueror, after 1070. The RICAR issue may have been struck in the name of his son Richard (1057- c. 1081), Duke of Bernay; and the W's may refer to his son William Rufus (1056 - 1100), King of the English.
ME79660. Silver denier, Dumas pl. XX, 12 (Brussels Coin Cabinet); Legros 337 (same, unique); Poey d'Avant –; Duplessy Féodales –; Roberts –; De Wit Collection –, VF, toned, weight 0.801 g, maximum diameter 18.5 mm, die axis 0o, Rouen mint, c. 1070 - 1081; obverse + NORMANNA, cross pattée, pellets in each quarter, within linear inner border; reverse stylized cathedral facade, cross within arched doorway, two pellets above arch, two towers flanking (each a line topped with an annulet), pellet in triangular pediment, two W's (for William Rufus?) above the pediment; extremely rare; SOLD


France, Feudal, Viscountship of Béziers, Roger I Trencavel, 1130 - 1150

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From the 10th to the 12th century the viscounts of Béziers ruled most of the nearby coastal plain, including the city of Agde. They also controlled the major east-west route through Languedoc, roughly following the old Roman Via Domitia, with the two key bridges over the Orb at Béziers and over the Hérault at Saint-Thibéry.

Béziers was stronghold of Catharism, which the Catholic Church condemned as heretical. Albigensian crusaders gave the Catholics in the city an ultimatum to hand over the heretics or leave, but they refused. When asked how to tell Catholics from Cathars, the Crusader abbot supposedly replied, "Kill them all, God will know His own." The next day, 22 July 1209, the crusaders massacred almost 20,000 people, sparing no one, irrespective of rank, sex or age, not even the Catholic priests. The whole city was burned. The burning cathedral of Saint Nazaire collapsed on those who had taken refuge inside.
ME58631. Billon denier, cf. Roberts 4264, Poey 3822, F, crude, wavy flan, weight 0.840 g, maximum diameter 19.5 mm, Béziers mint, 1130 - 1150; obverse + ROGER VICECOME, cross pattée cantoned with two anchors; reverse : BITERIS CIVI, B-O-E-O around a center point; very rare; SOLD


France, Provincial Normandie, Robert Curthose (Robert II), 1087 - 1106

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Robert Curthose (Robert II) was the eldest son of William the Conqueror. He was the Duke of Normandy from 1087 to 1106. His discord with his younger brothers, William Rufus and Henry, began in earnest when, as a prank, they dumped a full chamber-pot over his head. It continued until Henry seized the English throne, invaded and absorbed Normandy as an English possession, and imprisoned Robert for the rest of his life.
SH73354. Silver denier, Dumas group B/C, pl. XIX, 22; Sambon Les deniers p. 328, fig. 1; cf. Roberts 4487 (similar ); Poey-dAvant -; Boudeau -, gF, slightly off-center on the usual crowded flan, weight 0.680 g, maximum diameter 16.9 mm, die axis 0o, Rouen mint, 1187 - 1106; obverse abstract cathedral(?) design including a triangular pediment with pellet at center and one more at each sides, center column, circle on left with R inside, circle on right with II inside, cross pattée below center with pellet flanking each side; reverse +NORMANNA, cross pattée, pellet in each quarter; very rare; SOLD


France, Napoleon I, Died 1815, Unique Bronze Restrike of Medal of 1806

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SH35723. Bronze medal, Unique, single restrike made for the Bayard family of Delaware, c. 1880s, weight 29.169 g, maximum diameter 41.4 mm, die axis 0o, obverse conjoined busts of Napoleon and Charlemagne; reverse conjoined busts of Witikind and Frederick the Great; unique; SOLD


Anglo-Gallic, Edward the Black Prince, Prince of Aquitaine, 1362 - 1372

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Edward of Woodstock (15 June 1330 - 8 June 1376), called the Black Prince, was the eldest son of King Edward III and Philippa of Hainault, and the father of King Richard II of England. He was the first Duke of Cornwall (from 1337), the Prince of Wales (from 1343) and the Prince of Aquitaine (1362-72). He was an exceptional military leader, and his victories over the French at the Battles of Crécy and Poitiers made him very popular in England during his lifetime. Edward died one year before his father, becoming the first English Prince of Wales not to become King of England. The throne passed instead to his son Richard II, a minor, upon the death of Edward III.
SH84611. Silver esterlin (sterling), Elias 194c, SCBC 8133, Duplessy Féodales 1125A, Boudeau 511, Poey d'Avant –, VF, toned, usual tight flan, clashed obverse die, slightly off center, weight 0.996 g, maximum diameter 18.9 mm, Poitiers mint, second issue; obverse + : ED' PO·GIT·REG·AnGL P (Edwardus Primo Genetis Regis Anglie Princeps, double annulet before legend, rosette stops), half-length figure of Edward right, wearing floral wreath. sword in right hand over right shoulder, raising left hand in benediction; reverse : PRI-CPS - AQV-TAE (Prince of Aquitaine, double annulet before legend), long cross pattée, trefoil of three pellets in each quarter; scarce; SOLD


Anglo-Gallic, Edward III, 1372 - 1377

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Edward III transformed the Kingdom of England into one of the most efficient military powers in Europe. His reign saw vital developments in the evolution of the English parliament, the ravages of the Black Death and the beginning of the Hundred Years' War. He remained on the throne for 50 years.

The outer obverse legend abbreviates, "BENEDICTUM SIT NOMEN DOMINI NOSTRI DEI," which means, "Blessed be the name of the Lord our God."
UK85377. Silver Gros Tournois au Leopard Au-Dessus, Elias 62f (R), SCBC 8060, Boudeau -, Poey d'Avant –, VF, toned, uneven strike with much of leopard and parts of legends unstruck, weight 2.003 g, maximum diameter 21.6 mm, die axis 0o, 1351 - 1356; obverse ED'· REX : AnGLIE / + BnDICTV · SIT · nOmE : DnI : nRI : DEI (crescent before REX, hammerhead on L), short cross pattée within inner circle; reverse DVX AQITAnIE, châtel aquitanique, annulets flanking crescent with horns up within, leopard left above, all surrounded by tressure of arches containing leaves ; rare; SOLD


Anglo-Gallic, Henry V de Lancastre, King of England, 1413 - 1422

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Henry V was the second English monarch from the House of Lancaster. After fighting the Welsh during the revolt of Owain Glyndwr, and against the powerful aristocratic Percys of Northumberland at the Battle of Shrewsbury, Henry came into political conflict with his father, whose health was increasingly precarious after 1405. After his father's death in 1413, Henry assumed control of the country and embarked on war with France in the ongoing Hundred Years' War (1337–1453). His military successes culminated in his famous victory at the Battle of Agincourt in 1415 and he came close to conquering France. After months of negotiation with Charles VI of France, the Treaty of Troyes (1420) recognized Henry V as regent and heir apparent to the French throne, and he was subsequently married to Charles's daughter, Catherine of Valois. Following Henry V's sudden and unexpected death in France two years later, he was succeeded by his infant son, who reigned as Henry VI.
ME79996. Silver Gros Florette, cf. Elias 246, Duplessy 435, Ciani 589, Lafaurie 439, Elias Collection 358, VF, edge crack, weight 3.163 g, maximum diameter 27.3 mm, die axis 180o, Normandy, Rouen mint, 1st issue, authorized 14 Jan 1419; obverse + hEnRICVS: FRANCORV: REX (Henry King of the Franks), triple pellet stops, pellet under second V, crown above three fleurs-de-lis; reverse + SIT: nOmE: DnI: BENEDICTV (the name of our Lord Jesus be blessed), triple pellet stops, cross fleury, crown in first quarter, lion in fourth quarter; scarce; SOLD


France, John II the Good, 26 April 1319 - 8 April 1364

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When John II the Good (French: Jean le Bon) came to power, France was faced many disasters: the Black Death which killed nearly half of its population; popular revolts known as Jacqueries; free companies of routiers who plundered the country; and losses to English aggression, including the Battle of Poitiers of 1356, in which John was captured. While John was a prisoner in London, his son Charles became regent and faced several rebellions, which he overcame. To liberate his father, in 1360 he concluded the Treaty of Brétigny, by which France lost many territories and paid an enormous ransom. In an exchange of hostages, including his son Louis, John was released from captivity to raise funds for his ransom. Upon his return in France, he created the franc to stabilize the currency and tried to get rid of the free companies by sending them to a crusade, but Pope Innocent VI died shortly before their meeting in Avignon. When informed that his son Louis had escaped from captivity, John did something that shocked and dismayed his people: he announced that he would voluntarily return to captivity in England, citing reasons of "good faith and honor." John was greeted in London in 1364 with parades and feasts. A few months after his arrival, however, he fell ill with an unknown malady and died. His body was returned to France, where he was interred in the royal chambers at Saint Denis Basilica. He was succeeded by his son Charles V.
ME84027. Silver Blanc au fleurs de lis, Duplessy 312, Ciani 425, Lafaurie 315, Roberts 2865, aVF, toned, areas of weak strike, clipped flan, weight 4.181 g, maximum diameter 29.1 mm, die axis 180o, 1360; obverse outer legend: + BnDICTV: SIT: nOmE: DnI: nRI: DEI: IhV. XPI (the name of our Lord Jesus Christ be blessed), triple pellet stops, inner legend: + IO-hES - DEI - GRA (John, by the grace of God); cross pattée, crown in each quarter, dividing inner legend; reverse FRAHCORm * REX (King of the Franks), semé of nine lis, one on far left and one on far right only partially visible; outer border of thirteen lis within arches; ex Gordon Andreas Singer (Greenbelt, MD); scarce; SOLD


France, Henry III, 1574 - 1589

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Three months after Henri was elected king of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth, his brother, Charles IX of France, died and Henri returned to France to assume the French throne. Henri brought several Polish inventions back to France, including septic facilities which deposited excrement outside the castle walls, a bath with regulated hot and cold water, and the fork. Henri gave protestant Huguenots the right of public worship, except in Paris and at Court. In response, Henry I, Duke of Guise, formed the Catholic League. Henri III was forced to flee Paris. After he had the duke assassinated, Henri III prepared to return to Paris but was murdered before he could return. During the French Revolution, his body was disinterred, desecrated, and thrown into a common grave.
WO54363. Silver 1/8 Ecu, Duplessy 1134, VF, weight 4.850 g, maximum diameter 26.6 mm, die axis 0o, Rennes mint, 1587; obverse SIT NOMEN DOMINI BENEDICTVM, crowned arms of France, V - III across fields, 9 (Rennes) below; reverse + HENRICVS III D G FRANC ET POL 1587, cross fleurée (arms ending in lis) with cruciform flower in the center; SOLD


France, Provincial, Duchy of Normandie, William the Conqueror, 1035 - 1087

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William I (c. 1028 - 9 September 1087), usually known as William the Conqueror and sometimes William the Bastard, was the first Norman King of England, reigning from 1066 until his death in 1087. The descendant of Viking raiders, he had been Duke of Normandy since 1035. After a long struggle to establish his power, by 1060 his hold on Normandy was secure, and he launched the Norman conquest of England in 1066. The rest of his life was marked by struggles to consolidate his hold over England and his continental lands and by difficulties with his eldest son.
ME77512. Silver denier, Roberts 4815; Dumas pl. XIX, 18; Legros 333; Poey-dAvant 132, VF, usual crude dies, tight flan, and uneven strike, weight 0.921 g, maximum diameter 18.8 mm, Rouen mint, 1035 - 1087; obverse + ROTOMAGVS, cross pattée, pellets in each quarter, within linear inner border; reverse cross with pellet within annulet at the end of each arm, a small cross in a circle in the center; in each quarter: a triangular temple pediment with pellet in center; very rare; SOLD


France, Duchy of Normandy, William the Conqueror - Henry Beauclerc, c . 1076 - 1135 A.D.

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The obverse legend for the similar coins has also been read as NORMANDVS, NORMANNIA and other variations, but all readings are likely only guesses of intent since the legends apparently are always blundered and incomplete. This coin was found in southern Italy. Other examples of similar degenerate temple type deniers have been found in the Holyland.
ME68179. Silver denier, cf. Metcalf Crusades 598; Dumas, Group C, pl. XX, 6 and 27; Poey-dAvant -, F, crude, clipped (as typical), weight 0.722 g, maximum diameter 19.3 mm, die axis 0o, Rouen(?) mint, obverse +NORMAN DVX (or similar, blundered, much off flan), cross pattee, pellet in each angle, thick inner border; reverse degenerate Carolingian temple type (degenerated to triangles, pellets, circles and arcs); very rare; SOLD


Anglo-Gallic, Henry VI de Lancastre, King of France and England, 1422 - 1453

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In 1422, the year old king of England inherited the French throne through his mad grandfather Charles VI of France; the iconography of this type represents the unification of the two nations. Ten years later Joan of Arc would make an appearance which would eventually loosen the English grip on France until by 1436 only Normandy and part of Maine remained in Henry's control.
SH84618. Silver grand blanc aux écus, Elias 288, Ciani 602, Duplessy 445, Lafaurie 449, gVF, edge split or chip, light marks, weight 3.088 g, maximum diameter 30.1 mm, die axis 270o, St Lô (lis mintmark) mint, 23 Nov 1422 - 1449; obverse (lis) FRANCORVm: ET: ANGLIE: REX (King of France and England), shields of England and France, hERICVS above; reverse (lis) SIT: nOmEN: DnI: BENEDICV (Blessed be the name of the Lord), cross dividing, fleur-de-lis to left, leopard left on right, hERICVS below; rare; SOLD


France, Duchy of Normandy, Richard I Sans Peur (the Fearless), 943 - 996 A.D.

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Richard was the eldest son of William I Longsword and grandson of the Viking chieftain Rollo, the founder of the Duchy of Normandy. He was a young boy when he succeeded as ruler of Normandy on the death of his father. Soon after, Normandy was seized by Louis IV and Richard was imprisoned. He eventually escaped and reclaimed Normandy. Louis' successor, Lothaire, invaded but they made peace in 965. Lothaire's monogram is on this coin. Richard greatly expanded feudalism in Normandy and, by the end of his reign, most important landholders held their lands in feudal tenure. Richard I was a grandfather of the English kings Harthacnute and Edward the Confessor, and a great-grandfather of William the Conqueror.
RL74455. Silver denier, Duplessy Féodales 18, Legros 209, Dumas Fécamp 4147 - 6041, Boudeau -, Poey d'Avant -, Choice VF, weight 1.140 g, maximum diameter 19.7 mm, Rotomagus (Rouen) mint, c. 980 - 985; obverse RICARDVS (A unbarred, S sideways), short cross pattée, pellet in each angle; reverse ROTOMAGVS (A unbarred, S sideways), monogram of Lothaire, king of the West Franks; SOLD


France, Louis XIV the Sun King, 1643 - 1715

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This coin is overstruck on an older coin, part of a "reformation" process involving financial manipulations and impacting all French silver and gold coinage from 1690 to 1709. The undertype is a Louis XIV, demi-écu aux huit L, Paris, workshop A, 1690 - 1693, Duplessy 1515; obverse: LVD•XIIII•D•G (sun) FR•ET•NAV•REX, draped and cuirassed bust of Louis XIV right, wearing large wig, obscure date below; reverse: (Mg) CHRS - REGN - VINC - IMP (star), cross formed of four groups of two L's, each arm under a crown cutting the legend, A (Paris mint workshop letter) in a circle at the center, lis in each quarter.
SH84613. Silver demi-écu aux palmes, Duplessy 1521A, Ciani 1895, Gadoury 185, Krause KM 295.1, VF, extraordinarily strong undertype remnants, reverse of undertype on obverse, obverse of undertype on reverse, weight 13.297 g, maximum diameter 34.5 mm, die axis 180o, Paris mint, 1694 (A, reformation); obverse LVD•XIIII•D•G (sun) FR•ET•NAV•REX (Louis XIV, by the grace of God, King of France and Navarre), cuirassed bust right, wearing large wig, cuirass ornamented with facing head of Medusa on chest; reverse BENEDICTVM (arrow point) 1964 (crescent horns up - indicates reformation) SIT•NOMEN•DOMINI (Blessed be the name of the Lord), crown above three lis in a circle (round arms of France), between two palms tied at the bottom, •A• (Paris mint workshop letter) below; edge inscribed: (lis) (sun) (lis) (flower) DOMINE (flower) (lis) (flower) SALVVM (lis) (flower) FAC (flower) (lis) (flower) REGEM; SOLD


France, Napoleonic Empire, 1804 - 1814 and 1815

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21.6 karat gold (900 fine), 0.1867 troy oz. gold net.
WO26072. Gold 20 Francs, Friedberg 514, Krause KM 695.1, VF, weight 6.429 g, maximum diameter 21.1 mm, die axis 180o, Paris mint, 1812; obverse NAPOLEON EMPEREUR, laureate head left; reverse EMPIRE FRANCAIS, 20 FRANCS within wreath, cock, 1812 and A below; DIEU PROTEGE LA FRANCE on rim; some scrapes at edge; SOLD


Anglo-Gallic, Edward the Black Prince, Prince of Aquitaine, 1355 - 1375

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Edward the Black Prince was the eldest son of King Edward III and the father of King Richard II of England. He was the first Duke of Cornwall (from 1337), the Prince of Wales (from 1343) and the Prince of Aquitaine (1362–72). He was an exceptional military leader, and his victories over the French at the Battles of Crécy and Poitiers made him very popular in England during his lifetime. In 1348 he was made a Founding Knight of the Garter. Edward died one year before his father, becoming the first English Prince of Wales not to become King of England. The throne passed instead to his son Richard II, a minor, upon the death of Edward III.
ME85374. Silver Hardi d'Argent, SCBC 8134; Elias 204; Duplessy Féodales 1126; Elias Collection 310; Boudeau 513; Poey d'Avant 2978; Hewlett p. 140, type 2,1, aEF, well centered on tight flan, attractive toning, clashed obverse die, tiny edge cracks, weight 1.137 g, maximum diameter 19.6 mm, die axis 0o, Limoges mint, 1362 - 1372; obverse ED• PO GI R-EG• AGE• L (Edwardvus, Primo Genitvs Regis Anglie, Limoges - Edward, first born of the King of England, Limoges [mint]), half-length figure of Edward facing beneath Gothic canopy, sword in right hand, raising left in benediction; reverse *PRI-CPS* - AQT-ANE (rosette stops, Princeps Aqvitanie - Prince of Aquitaine), long cross pattée, lis in first and fourth quarters, leopard in second and third quarters; SOLD


France, Duchy of Normandy, Robert Curthose (Robert II), 1087 - 1106

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Robert Curthose (Robert II) was the Duke of Normandy from 1087 until 1106. Robert, the eldest son of William the Conqueror and Matilda of Flanders. His discord with his brothers began with a prank played by his younger brothers William Rufus and Henry, who dumped a full chamber-pot over his head, and ended when Henry invaded Normandy and imprisoned him for the rest of his life.
ME65602. Billon denier, cf. Roberts 4833, aF, clipped, scratches, weight 0.600 g, maximum diameter 18.6 mm, Rouen or Bayeux mint, obverse fonton with besant over cross, flanked on each side with a pellet over annulet; reverse NORMAN DVX, cross pattée, pellet in each quarter; very rare; SOLD


France, Carolingians, Kingdom of West Francia, Charles the Simple, 897 - 922 A.D.

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In 911, a group of Vikings lead by Rollo besieged Paris and Chartres. Charles decided to negotiate. Rollo was granted lands for which he promised loyalty and military assistance. Rollo also agreed to be baptised and to marry Gisela, Charles' illegitimate daughter. Rollo's descendants were the Dukes of Normandy, and following the Norman conquest in 1066, kings of England.
ME67306. Silver denier, MEC I p. 552, 995; Roberts 1414 (Charles the Bald), Poey-dAvant -, F, weight 1.200 g, maximum diameter 18.8 mm, die axis 0o, Le Mans mint, obverse + GRATIA D-I REX, Karolus monogram; reverse + CIN◊MANIS CIVITAS, cross pattée; SOLD


France, John II the Good, 26 April 1319 - 8 April 1364

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When John II the Good (French: Jean le Bon) came to power, France was faced many disasters: the Black Death which killed nearly half of its population; popular revolts known as Jacqueries; free companies of routiers who plundered the country; and losses to English aggression, including the Battle of Poitiers of 1356, in which John was captured. While John was a prisoner in London, his son Charles became regent and faced several rebellions, which he overcame. To liberate his father, in 1360 he concluded the Treaty of Brétigny, by which France lost many territories and paid an enormous ransom. In an exchange of hostages, including his son Louis, John was released from captivity to raise funds for his ransom. Upon his return in France, he created the franc to stabilize the currency and tried to get rid of the free companies by sending them to a crusade, but Pope Innocent VI died shortly before their meeting in Avignon. When informed that his son Louis had escaped from captivity, John did something that shocked and dismayed his people: he announced that he would voluntarily return to captivity in England, citing reasons of "good faith and honor." John was greeted in London in 1364 with parades and feasts. A few months after his arrival, however, he fell ill with an unknown malady and died. His body was returned to France, where he was interred in the royal chambers at Saint Denis Basilica. He was succeeded by his son Charles V.
ME84028. Silver Gros Tournois, Duplessy 301, Ciani 408, Lafaurie 304, Roberts 2524, aVF, rose coppery toning, weak centers, weight 3.899 g, maximum diameter 27.4 mm, die axis 270o, 1st emission; obverse outer legend: + BNDICTV: SIT: nOmE: DNI: nRI: DEI: IhV. XPI (the name of our Lord Jesus Christ be blessed), triple pellet stops, bar over 2nd V and PI, inner legend: + IOHANNES REX (King Philip), trilobe stop; cross pattée; reverse TVRONVS•CIVIS (City of Tours), trilobe stop, Châtel tournois topped with a fleur de lis, outer border of twelve lis within arches; rare; SOLD


France, The League in the Name of Henri III, 2 August 1589 - 23 January 1596

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Three months after Henri was made the elected king of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth, his brother, Charles IX of France, died and Henri returned to France to assume the French throne. Henri brought several Polish inventions back to France, including septic facilities which deposited excrement outside the castle walls, a bath with regulated hot and cold water, and the fork. Henri gave protestant Huguenots the right of public worship, except in Paris and at Court. In response, Henry I, Duke of Guise, formed the Catholic League. Henri III was eventually forced to flee Paris. After he had the duke assassinated, Henri III prepared to return to Paris but was murdered before he could return. During the French Revolution Henri III was disinterred from his tomb, his body was desecrated and thrown into a common grave.
ME65252. Silver half franc, Duplessy 1160, Roberts 3575, Lafaurie 1002, F, irregular flan with open cracks, weight 13.961 g, maximum diameter 32.6 mm, die axis 315o, Limoges mint, 1590 - 1591; obverse HENRICVS III D G FRANC ET POL REX (King of France and Poland), laureate and cuirassed bust of Henry III right, •I• (mint mark) below; reverse + SIT NOMEN DOMINI BENEDICTVM (May the name of the Lord be blessed), cross of leaves each arm tipped with lis, H in the center; SOLD


France, Third Republic, 1871 - 1940, Gold 20 Franks, 1898, ICG MS-63

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21.6 karat gold (.900) fine, 0.1867 troy oz gold net.
SL26021. Gold 20 Franks, Friedberg 592, Krause KM 825, ICG MS-64, weight 6.451 g, maximum diameter 21 mm, die axis 180o, Paris mint, 1898; obverse REPUBLIQE FRANCAISE, angel stands right, writing the constitution on a tablet, fasces behind, rooster before; reverse LIBERTE EGALITE FRATERNITE, 20 FRANKS 1898 within wreath, A mint mark below; SOLD


France, Third Republic, 1871 - 1940, Gold 20 Franks, 1897, ICG MS-64

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21.6 karat gold (.900) fine, 0.1867 troy oz gold net.
SL26022. Gold 20 Franks, Friedberg 592, Krause KM 825, ICG MS-64, weight 6.451 g, maximum diameter 21 mm, die axis 180o, Paris mint, 1897; obverse REPUBLIQE FRANCAISE, angel stands right, writing the constitution on a tablet, fasces behind, rooster before; reverse LIBERTE EGALITE FRATERNITE, 20 FRANKS 1897 within wreath, A mint mark below; SOLD


France, Third Republic, 1871 - 1940, Gold 20 Franks, 1877, ICG MS-64

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21.6 karat gold (.900) fine, 0.1867 troy oz gold net.
SL26023. Gold 20 Franks, Friedberg 592, Krause KM 825, ICG MS-64, weight 6.451 g, maximum diameter 21 mm, die axis 180o, Paris mint, 1877; obverse REPUBLIQE FRANCAISE, angel stands right, writing the constitution on a tablet, fasces behind, rooster before; reverse LIBERTE EGALITE FRATERNITE, 20 FRANKS 1877 within wreath, A mint mark below; SOLD


France, Third Republic, 1871 - 1940, Gold 20 Franks, 1877, ICG MS-64

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21.6 karat gold (.900) fine, 0.1867 troy oz gold net.
SL26024. Gold 20 Franks, Friedberg 592, Krause KM 825, ICG MS-64, weight 6.451 g, maximum diameter 21 mm, die axis 180o, Paris mint, 1877; obverse REPUBLIQE FRANCAISE, angel stands right, writing the constitution on a tablet, fasces behind, rooster before; reverse LIBERTE EGALITE FRATERNITE, 20 FRANKS 1877 within wreath, A mint mark below; SOLD


France, Provincial Normandie, Henri I Beauclerc, 1106 - 1135

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Henry I Beauclerc, the fourth son of William the Conqueror, was King of England from 1100 to 1135. On William's death, Henry's older brothers William Rufus and Robert Curthose inherited England and Normandy respectively. Henry was left landless. Henry purchased the County of Cotentin in western Normandy from Robert, but his brothers deposed him. Henry was present when William died in a hunting accident, and he seized the English throne. Henry invaded Normandy, defeated and imprisoned Robert for the rest of his life.
ME67311. Billon denier, Roberts 4487, Poey-dAvant -, Boudeau -, aF, weight 0.540 g, maximum diameter 16.9 mm, Rouen mint, c. 1108 - 1130; obverse cross pattée with open center; top arm forming small cross pattée; pellets in upper quarters, annulets in lower; reverse +NORMANNA, cross pattée, pellet in each quarter; very rare Norman issue of the English king Henry I; SOLD


France, Third Republic, 1871 - 1940, Gold 20 Franks, 1893, ICG MS-63

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21.6 karat gold (.900) fine, 0.1867 troy oz gold net.
SL26020. Gold 20 Franks, Friedberg 592, Krause KM 825, ICG MS-63, weight 6.4516 g, maximum diameter 21 mm, die axis 180o, Paris mint, 1893; obverse REPUBLIQE FRANCAISE, angel stands right, writing the constitution on a tablet, fasces behind, rooster before; reverse LIBERTE EGALITE FRATERNITE, 20 FRANKS 1893 within wreath, A mint mark below; SOLD


France, Philip IV, 1285 - 1314 A.D.

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King Philip IV, deeply in debt to the Knights Templar, took advantage of rumors about the Order's secret initiation ceremony. On Friday, October 13, 1307, he had the Order's members in France arrested (the origin of the Friday the 13th superstition). Pope Clement, under threat from Philip, instructed all Christian monarchs in Europe to arrest all Templars and seize their assets. Many Templars were tortured into giving false confessions and burned at the stake. Grand Master Jacques de Molay, burned alive in Paris in 1314, called out from the flames, "Dieu sait qui a tort et a pëché. Il va bientot arriver malheur à ceux qui nous ont condamnés à mort" ("God knows who is wrong and has sinned. Soon a calamity will occur to those who have condemned us to death"). Pope Clement died only a month later, and King Philip died in a hunting accident before the end of the year.
ME47829. Silver Gros Tournois, Duplessy 213 ff., F, slightly grainy, weight 3.664 g, maximum diameter 25.9 mm, die axis 0o, obverse + BNDICTV: SIT: NOmE: DNI: nRI: DEI: IhV. XPI (outer), + PhILIPPVS REX (inner), cross pattée, legend around in two rows; reverse TVRONVS CIVIS, Châtel tournois topped with a cross, border of twelve lis within arches; SOLD


France, Carolingians, Kingdom of West Francia, Charles the Simple, 897 - 922 A.D., Reverse Brockage

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In 911, a group of Vikings lead by Rollo besieged Paris and Chartres. Charles decided to negotiate. Rollo was granted lands for which he promised loyalty and military assistance. Rollo also agreed to be baptised and to marry Gisela, Charles' illegitimate daughter. Rollo's descendants were the Dukes of Normandy, and following the Norman conquest in 1066, kings of England.
ME65994. Silver denier, cf. MEC I, p. 552, 993 ff., VF, reverse brockage, weight 1.357 g, maximum diameter 20.1 mm, obverse incuse of reverse (normally GRATIA D-I REX, Karolus monogram); reverse CIN◊MANIS CIVITAS, cross pattée; SOLD


France, Louis XVIII, 1814 - 1824 A.D.

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WO47796. Silver 5 Francs, Krause KM 711.1, VF, toned, weight 24.927 g, maximum diameter 37.2 mm, die axis 180o, Paris mint, 1821 A.D.; obverse LOUIS XVIII ROI DE FRANCE, head of Louis XVIII left, MICHAUT F and horse's head right below; reverse crowned coat-of-arms within wreath, 5 - F across fields, 1821, rooster standing left, and A (date, mintmaster's mark, and mint mark) in exergue; SOLD


France, Carolingians, Kingdom of West Francia, Charles the Simple - Louis d'Outremer, 900 - 950 A.D.

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Some authorities date the last immobilized Melle mint types of Charles the Bald struck by the Counts of Poitiers as late as 1300.
ME73911. Silver denier, Immobilized Melle mint type of Charles the Bald; Roberts 3862, Poey-dAvant 2424, cf. Depeyrot 629, VF, weight 0.909 g, maximum diameter 21.6 mm, die axis 180o, Counts of Poitiers, Melle mint, 900 - 950 A.D.; obverse + CARLVS REX R, cross pattée; reverse MET/ΛLO, in two lines; ex Harlan J. Berk; SOLD


France, Duchy of Normandy, Richard I Sans Peur (the Fearless), 943 - 996 A.D.

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Richard was the eldest son of William I Longsword and grandson of the Viking chieftain Rollo, the founder of the Duchy of Normandy. He was a young boy when he succeeded as ruler of Normandy on the death of his father. Soon after, Normandy was seized by Louis IV and Richard was imprisoned. He eventually escaped and reclaimed Normandy. Louis' successor, Lothaire, invaded but they made peace in 965. Lothaire's monogram is on this coin. Richard greatly expanded feudalism in Normandy and, by the end of his reign, most important landholders held their lands in feudal tenure. Richard I was a grandfather of the English kings Harthacnute and Edward the Confessor, and a great-grandfather of William the Conqueror.
RL74458. Silver denier, Duplessy Féodales 18, Legros 209, Dumas Fécamp 4147 - 6041, Boudeau -, Poey d'Avant -, VF, uneven strike, appears to be a re-struck brockage?, weight 1.077 g, maximum diameter 20.3 mm, Rotomagus (Rouen) mint, c. 980 - 985; obverse RICARDVS (A unbarred, S sideways), short cross pattée, pellet in each angle; reverse ROTOMAGVS (A unbarred, S sideways), monogram of Lothaire, king of the West Franks; SOLD


Anglo-Gallic, Richard I the Lionhearted, Count of Poitou and King of England 1189 - 1199

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The only coins of Richard struck in his own name are those of his French possessions; English issues attributed to Richard are all in the name and types of his father, Henry II.

Richard I is known as Richard Coeur de Lion or Richard the Lionhearted for his bravery in battle. He was born and spent his childhood in England. By the age of 16, Richard had command of his own army and put down rebellions against his father in Poitou. As king, he was off on Crusade, in captivity, or defending his lands in France, spending as little as 6 months of his 10-year reign in England. He spoke French and Occitan, but never learned English. Rather than regarding his kingdom as a responsibility requiring his presence as ruler, it seems he saw it primarily as a source of revenue to support his armies. As the leader of the Third Crusade after the departure of Philip II of France, he won considerable victories against Saladin, but did not retake Jerusalem. He was seen as a pious hero by his subjects and is one of the few kings of England remembered by his epithet, rather than regnal number, and is an enduring iconic figure both in England and in France. Robin Hood lived in Sherwood Forest during Richard's reign.
ME85561. Silver denier, Poey d'Avant 2506, SCBC 8008, Elias 8, Duplessy Feodales 920, aVF, reverse triple struck, weight 0.816 g, maximum diameter 19.4 mm, die axis 0o, Melle (Deux-Sèvres) mint, 1189 - 1199; obverse + RICARDVS REX (King Richard), cross pattée within inner dot border; reverse PIC/TAVIE/NSIS ([County of] Poitou) in three lines across field; SOLD


France, Philip I, 1060 - 1108 A.D.

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Philip's name, exotic for Western Europe at the time, was derived from Philippos (Greek, meaning "lover of horses"). He was crowned at seven, his mother was the first queen of France to act as regent. Philip was excommunicated after he repudiated his first wife (claiming she was too fat) and taking another. His reign was extraordinarily long for the time.
ME52432. Silver denier, Duplessy 50, Roberts 2376, VF, weight 1.179 g, maximum diameter 21.3 mm, die axis 135o, Orléans mint, obverse + PHILIPVS X REX D-I, Gate, IN-I-IC/AT around and inside; reverse + AVRELIANIS CIVITA, cross cantonnée, S in the 1st and 4th quadrants; SOLD


France, Counts of Provence and Forcalquier, Charles I of Anjou, 1246 - 1285 A.D.

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The Romans made the region into the first Roman province beyond the Alps and called it Provincia Romana, which evolved into the present name. It was ruled by the Counts of Provence from their capital in Aix-en-Provence until 1481, when it became a province of the Kings of France. While it has been part of France for more than five hundred years, it still retains a distinct cultural and linguistic identity, particularly in the interior of the region.

In 1246, Charles, Count of Anjou, the youngest son of Louis VIII, married the heiress of Provence, Beatrice. Provence's fortunes became tied to the Angevin Dynasty and the Kingdom of Naples.
ME70456. Silver denier tournois, Boudeau 811 (pellet in N and crescent shaped E = Saint-Rémy after 1262), Poey-dAvant II 3947 (also w/ crescent shaped E), Duplessy 1617, Roberts 5206, VF, weight 0.684 g, maximum diameter 17.8 mm, die axis 0o, Saint-Rémy mint, 1262 - 1285 A.D.; obverse + K•CO•P•FI•RE•F (Charles Count of Provence, son of the King of France), cross pattée; reverse + PVINCIALIS, castle tournois, lis above center; SOLD


France, County of Anjou, Fulk IV, Geoffrey IV to Fulk V, 1060 - 1129

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Fulk IV (French: Foulques) was Count of Anjou, 1068 - 1109. He supposedly wrote a history of Anjou and its rulers. Only the first part describing his ancestry, is extant. The second part, supposedly describing Fulk's own rule, is lost. If he did write it, it is one of the first medieval works of history written by a layman.

Geoffrey IV, called Martel (the Hammer), was Count of Anjou, 1103 until his early death in 1106, either co-ruling with his father, Fulk IV, or in opposition to him. He was popular with the Church and grew a reputation for curbing tyranny and opposing his violent father, who, according to Orderic Vitalis, enjoyed pillaging and terrorising his subjects.

Fulk the Younger, was Count of Anjou (as Fulk V), 1109 - 1129, and King of Jerusalem from 1131 to his death. He was also the paternal grandfather of Henry II of England.
ME67998. Silver denier, Poey-dAvant 1495, Boudeau 152 - 153 var., Roberts 4113 var, VF, clipped, weight 0.742 g, maximum diameter 16.2 mm, die axis 45o, Angers mint, obverse + VRBS ANDEGAVIS, reversed FVLKO monogram; reverse + FVLCO COMES, Croix cantonnée, alpha and omega in the 4th and 2d quarters; rare; SOLD


France, Provins, County of Champagne, Henry I - II, 1152 - 1197

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The reverse design incorporates a rather clever pun. The reverse field contains a comb. When the French words for field (champs) and comb (peigne) are combined, the pun (champs-peigne) is revealed. Visual puns apparently delighted medieval man.
ME67300. Billon obol, Boudeau 1761 (Henri I, 12 Francs), Poey-dAvant 5973 var. (no V), F, weight 0.323 g, maximum diameter 3.1 mm, die axis 45o, Provins mint, 1152 - 1197; obverse + HENRI COMES (Count Henry), cross cantonnée, pellet in 1st and 4th quadrants, star in 2nd quadrant, and annulet in 3rd quadrant; reverse CASTRI PRVVINS (Castle Provins), comb; three wedges forming a V above, flanked on each side by annulet; scarce; SOLD


France, Louis IX, 1226 - 1270

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Saint Louis ruled when France was at its height, both politically and economically. Louis was a devout Catholic, and he built the Sainte-Chapelle. He was renowned for his charity. The peace and blessings of the realm come to us through the poor he would say. Beggars were fed from his table, he ate their leavings, washed their feet, ministered to the wants of lepers, and daily fed over one hundred poor. He founded the House of the Felles-Dieu for reformed prostitutes, the Quinze-Vingt for 300 blind men, and hospitals at Pontoise, Vernon, and Compiégne. He died at Tunis, during his second crusade. He is the only canonized king of France; consequently, there are many places named after him, most notably St. Louis, Missouri.
ME66988. Silver denier tournois, Roberts 2413, Duplessy 193A, F, weight 0.757 g, maximum diameter 18.6 mm, die axis 315o, Touraine mint, 1226 - 1270; obverse + LVDOVICVS•REX, cross pattée; reverse + TVRONIS•CIVIS, châtel tournois; SOLD


France, Philip IV the Fair, 1285 - 1314

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King Philip IV, deeply in debt to the Knights Templar, took advantage of rumors about the Order's secret initiation ceremony. On Friday, October 13, 1307, he had the Order's members in France arrested (the origin of the Friday the 13th superstition). Pope Clement, under threat from Philip, instructed all Christian monarchs in Europe to arrest all Templars and seize their assets. Many Templars were tortured into giving false confessions and burned at the stake. Grand Master Jacques de Molay, burned alive in Paris in 1314, called out from the flames, "Dieu sait qui a tort et a pëché. Il va bientot arriver malheur à ceux qui nous ont condamnés à mort" ("God knows who is wrong and has sinned. Soon a calamity will occur to those who have condemned us to death"). Pope Clement died only a month later, and King Philip died in a hunting accident before the end of the year.
ME58619. Silver double tournois, Duplessy 229, aVF, clashed dies, weight 1.020 g, maximum diameter 21.6 mm, die axis 180o, 1295 - 1303; obverse + PhILIPPVS REX, short cross pattée, lis in quarter; reverse + MON DVPLEX REGAL, roof Châtel tournois, between lis; rare; SOLD


France, Henri IV, 1589 - 1610

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Henry IV, also known as "Good King Henry", was King of Navarre from 1572 to 1610. Upon the death of his brother-in-law and distant cousin Henry III of France, Henry was called to the French succession in 1589. He initially kept the Protestant faith but after four years and at least 12 assassination attempts, he abjured the Calvinist faith. He promulgated the Edict of Nantes in 1598, guaranteeing religious freedom and ending the Wars of Religion. He was assassinated in 1610 by a fanatical Catholic. Unpopular immediately after his accession, Henry's popularity greatly improved after his death. The "Good King Henry" (le bon roi Henri) was remembered for his geniality and his great concern about the welfare of his subjects.
ME47846. Copper double tournois, Duplessy 1273, Lafaurie 1111, aVF, weight 3.087 g, maximum diameter 20.6 mm, die axis 180o, Paris mint, 1608; obverse HENRI•IIII•R•DE•FRAN•ET•NAV, laureate and cuirassed bust of Henry IV right, A (Paris mint mark) below; reverse + DOVBLE•TOVRNOIS•1608, three lis in the central field, two lis above, one below; SOLD


France, Charles VI, 1380 - 1422

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ME48955. Silver florette, Duplessy 387, F, weight 3.254 g, maximum diameter 25.8 mm, die axis 270o, 1st royal emission, 1417; obverse +KAROLVS:FRANCORV:REX, crown above 3 lis; reverse +SIT:NOME:DNI:BENEDICTV, cross fleury with crown in two angles; SOLD


France, Louis XIII, 1610 - 1643

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Money of d'Artagnan and The Three Musketeers!

Louis XIII and especially his devious First Minister Cardinal Richelieu were the antagonists in The Three Musketeers by Alexandre Dumas and its subsequent film adaptations.
ME48688. Copper double tournois, Duplessy 1366, VF, weight 2.865 g, maximum diameter 20.5 mm, die axis 180o, Paris mint, 1630; obverse •LOVIS•XIII R•DE FRAN•ET•NAV• (VI ligated to Y), laureate bust right within circle, A (Paris mint mark) below; reverse +DOVBLE•TOVRNOIS•1630•, three lis in the central field, two above and one below, within circular inner border; SOLD


France, Duchy of Aquitaine, William X, 1126 - 9 April 1137

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The Duchy of Aquitaine, governed under the supremacy of Frankish, English, and French kings, was much larger than the present-day French region.

The year that William X was born his father left on crusade. He later abandoned Williams' mother, which strained the relationship between father and son, until William married the daughter of his father's mistress. William was a lover of the arts and a warrior. He resolved internal challenges with the total destruction of his enemies and fought with both Normandy and France. Defying his own bishops, William initially supported antipope Anacletus II in the schism of 1130, but later supported Pope Innocent. He died, probably from food poisoning, on a pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostela.
Duchy of Aquitaine
ME67994. Silver denier, Roberts 4311, Boudeau 464, Poey-dAvant 2735, gVF, edge chip, weight 0.702 g, maximum diameter 17.5 mm, die axis 225o, Bordeaux mint, 1127 - 9 Apr 1137; obverse +GIVILILMO, four crosslets; reverse +BVRDEGVLA, cross pattée; SOLD


France, Provins, County of Champagne, Henry I - II, 1152 - 1197

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The reverse design incorporates a rather clever pun. The reverse field contains a comb. When the French words for field (champs) and comb (peigne) are combined, the pun (champs-peigne) is revealed. Visual puns apparently delighted medieval man.
ME67843. Billon obol, Boudeau 1763 (Henri II, 20 Francs), Poey-dAvant 5977, cf. Roberts 4727 (similar denier), aF, weight 0.358 g, maximum diameter 14.3 mm, die axis 45o, Provins mint, 1152 - 1197; obverse + HENRI COMES (Count Henry), cross cantonnée, pellet in 1st and 4th quadrants, star in 2nd quadrant, and annulet in 3rd quadrant; reverse CASTRI PRVVINS (Castle Provins), comb; three wedges forming a V above, flanked by star left and annulet right; rare; SOLD


France, Henri IV, 1574 - 1589, Marriage Treizain

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Gold plated, likely to serve as a marriage treizain, a medal blessed and exchanged by couples on the day of their marriage. This custom lasted until the 19th century.
ME47844. Copper double tournois, Duplessy 1273, gF, weight 3.047 g, maximum diameter 20.5 mm, die axis 180o, Paris mint, 1605; obverse HENRI•IIII•R•DE•FRAN•ET•NAV A, laureate and cuirassed bust of Henry III right, A (Paris mint mark) below; reverse + DOVBLE•TOVRNOIS•1605, three lis in the central field, two lis above, one below; SOLD


France, Strasbourg, Louis XIV, 1683

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Under Louis XIV, the Sun King, France reached the apogee of its power. His reign began at age four and lasted seventy-two years, three months, and eighteen days; one of the longest of any European monarch. He fought three major wars: the Franco-Dutch War, the War of the League of Augsburg, and the War of the Spanish Succession. Louis converted a hunting lodge into the spectacular Palace of Versailles, and by compelling the noble elite to inhabit his lavish palace, he pacified the aristocracy and eliminated the remnants of feudalism. He consolidated a system of absolute monarchical rule in France that endured until the French Revolution.
WO54808. Silver 2 sols, Duplessy 1598, Krause 246, aVF, crease, weight 1.433 g, maximum diameter 21.3 mm, die axis 180o, Strasbourg mint, 1683; obverse MONE NOV ARGENTINEN:, large fleur-de-lis; reverse GLORIA IN EXCELSIS DEO, •II• / •SOLS• / •1683•; SOLD




  




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REFERENCES

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Spink. The Important Collection of Anglo-Gallic and related French and English Coins - Formed by the late Edward Elias, auction, 21 Jun 1990, London.
Woodhead, P. The Herbert Schneider Collection, Volume Three, Anglo-Gallic, Flemish and Brabantine Gold Coins, 1330 - 1794. (London, 2011).

Catalog current as of Thursday, November 23, 2017.
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