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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Themes & Provenance ▸ Birds ▸ DoveView Options:  |  |  |   

Doves on Ancient Coins

Metapontion, Lucania, Italy, 334 - 330 B.C.

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Gold coins of Magna Graecia are scarce and were only minted for exceptional occasions, such as paying mercenaries. Most likely this rare issue was struck when Alexander Molossus, the Epirote King, helped Metapontion against the Lucanians and Bruttians. Molossus was Alexander the Great's uncle and Olympia's brother.
SH86428. Gold 1/3 stater, SNG Lockett 406; SNG ANS 395; HN Italy 1578; Noe-Johnston 3, G1 and pl. 18; SNG Lloyd -; SNG Cop -; Jameson -; Gulbenkian -; Pozzi -; Weber -, aVF+, fine style, marks, reverse double struck, weight 2.574 g, maximum diameter 13.6 mm, die axis 180o, Metapontion mint, c. 334 - 332 B.C.; obverse head of Demeter right, wearing stephane and pendant earring; reverse METAΠON, barley stalk, bird right on leaf to right; ex Forum (2007), ex Christie's Auction (1993) ; very rare; SOLD


Sikyon, Peloponnesos, Greece, c. 335 - 330 B.C.

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Sikyon was located in the northern Peloponnesus between Corinth and Achaea. Sicyon was known in antiquity for its industries including wood sculpture, bronze work, and pottery. Its central location meant it was frequently involved in the wars of its neighbors, Thebes, Corinth, Athens and Sparta.
SH67618. Silver stater, BCD Peloponnesos 219; Traitť III 776; BMC Peloponnesus p. 40, 56; SNG Cop 48 var. (N vice I), VF, toned, struck with a worn obverse die, weight 11.943 g, maximum diameter 23.2 mm, die axis 270o, Sikyon mint, c. 335 - 330 B.C.; obverse chimera advancing left, paw raised, wreath above, ΣE below; reverse dove flying left, I left, all within olive wreath; ex CNG Auction 312, lot 88; from a collection formed in the late 1930s; SOLD


Sikyon, Peloponnesos, Greece, c. 431 - 400 B.C.

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Sikyon was located in the northern Peloponnesus between Corinth and Achaea. Sicyon was known in antiquity for its industries including wood sculpture, bronze work, and pottery. Its central location meant it was frequently involved in the wars of its neighbors, Thebes, Corinth, Athens and Sparta.
SH21690. Silver hemidrachm, BCD Peloponnesos 205.2 (same dies), gVF, nicely toned, weight 2.824 g, maximum diameter 19.6 mm, die axis 180o, Sikyon mint, c. 431 - 400 B.C.; obverse Chimera advancing left, ΣI below; reverse dove flying left; SOLD


Sikyon, Peloponnesos, Greece, c. 334 - 330 B.C.

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Sikyon was located in the northern Peloponnesus between Corinth and Achaea. Sicyon was known in antiquity for its industries including wood sculpture, bronze work, and pottery. Its central location meant it was frequently involved in the wars of its neighbors, Thebes, Corinth, Athens and Sparta.
SH50538. Silver stater, BCD Peloponnesos 218 (same dies); Traitť 776; BMC Peloponnesus p. 40, 57, VF, weight 11.752 g, maximum diameter 24.1 mm, die axis 270o, c. late 330s B.C.; obverse chimera advancing left, paw raised, wreath above, ΣE below; reverse dove flying left, N left, all within olive wreath; beautiful rainbow toning; SOLD


Sikyon, Peloponnesos, Greece, 400 - 300 B.C.

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The chimera was a mythological monstrous fire-breathing creature of Lycia composed of the parts of a lion, a snake and a goat. Usually depicted as a lion, with the head of a goat arising from its back, and a tail that ended in a snake's head, the Chimera was one of the offspring of Typhon and Echidna and a sibling of such monsters as Cerberus and the Lernaean Hydra. The term chimaera has come to describe any mythical or fictional animal with parts taken from various animals, or to describe anything perceived as wildly imaginative or implausible.
GS37427. Silver hemidrachm, SNG Cop 59 - 60; BMC Peloponnesus, p. 46, 118; BCD Peloponnesos 301.1, gVF, nicely centered, weight 2.809 g, maximum diameter 15.7 mm, die axis 0o, Sikyon mint, obverse Chimera standing left, ΣI below; reverse dove flying left, No above tail; ex BCD collection; SOLD


Alexander the Great, Sicyon, northern Peloponnesus, Greece, c. 225 - c. 215 B.C.

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The dove and the boy with taenia are distinctive symbols of Sicyon. The boy has been related to a ritual dance performed at the city. - The Coinage in the Name of Alexander the Great and Philip Arrhidaeus by Martin Jessop Price

Forum speculates that this might be an anniversary issue struck in 223 B.C., 100 years after Alexander's death.
SH09538. Silver tetradrachm, Price -, VF, weight 16.41 g, maximum diameter 29.4 mm, die axis 225o, Sicyon mint, posthumous, c. 225 - c. 215 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, clad in Nemean Lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus AŽtophoros enthroned left, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, right leg drawn back, dove flying left over boy with taenia on left, Γ under throne; poorly struck obverse, not listed in Price; unpublished?; SOLD


Sikyon, Peloponnesos, Greece, c. 400 - 360 B.C.

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The chimera was a mythological monstrous fire-breathing creature of Lycia composed of the parts of a lion, a snake and a goat. Usually depicted as a lion, with the head of a goat arising from its back, and a tail that ended in a snake's head, the Chimera was one of the offspring of Typhon and Echidna and a sibling of such monsters as Cerberus and the Lernaean Hydra. The term chimaera has come to describe any mythical or fictional animal with parts taken from various animals, or to describe anything perceived as wildly imaginative or implausible.
SH26777. Silver hemidrachm, BMC Peloponnesus p. 45, 111; SNG Cop 57, VF, weight 2.755 g, maximum diameter 16.5 mm, die axis 90o, Sikyon mint, c. 400 - 360 B.C.; obverse Chimera advancing left, ΣI below; reverse dove flying left; SOLD


Sikyon, Peloponnesos, Greece, c. 330 - 280 B.C.

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The chimera was a mythological monstrous fire-breathing creature of Lycia composed of the parts of a lion, a snake and a goat. Usually depicted as a lion, with the head of a goat arising from its back, and a tail that ended in a snake's head, the Chimera was one of the offspring of Typhon and Echidna and a sibling of such monsters as Cerberus and the Lernaean Hydra. The term chimaera has come to describe any mythical or fictional animal with parts taken from various animals, or to describe anything perceived as wildly imaginative or implausible.
GS90784. Silver triobol, BCD Peloponnesos 288.1; SNG Cop 58; BMC Peloponnesus p. 46, 117, VF, toned, centered, weight 2.763 g, maximum diameter 14.7 mm, die axis 180o, Sikyon mint, c. 330 - 280 B.C.; obverse Chimera standing left, raising forepaw, ΣI below; reverse dove flying left; I below head; ex CNG auction 231, lot 71; ex BCD Collection; SOLD


Macedonian Kingdom, Alexander the Great, 336 - 323 B.C.

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After Alexander's death, many cities cleverly continued to strike coins in the name of Alexander, maintaining neutrality, rather than favoring any one of the Diadochi (Alexander's successors). Although Greece was declared "free" in 311 B.C., it soon became a chaotic battleground. Old men, once comrades in Alexander's army, along with their children, fought each other to death to expand their kingdoms. Ptolemy I of Egypt took Corinth from Antigonus in 308. Demetrius Poliorcetes defeated Ptolemy and returned to Greece in 302 B.C. Claiming to be a liberator, he reinstated the Corinthian League.
GS86197. Silver tetradrachm, Price 671; Troxell Peloponnesian, pl. xix, 6; SNG MŁnchen -; SNG Cop -; SNG Alpha Bank -, VF, high relief, toned, bumps, marks and scratches, areas of porosity, weight 16.454 g, maximum diameter 26.9 mm, die axis 165o, Greece, Corinth mint, posthumous, c. 310 - 290 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, clad in Nemean Lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus AŽtophoros enthroned left, nude to the waist, himation around hips and legs, feet on footstool, right foot drawn back, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, dove flying left surrounded by wreath in left field, H under throne; extremely rare - only a few examples known to Forum; SOLD


Sikyon, Peloponnesos, Greece, c. 350 - 330 B.C.

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The affectionate dove, the bird of love, was sacred to the goddess Venus (Aphrodite). Doves were said to draw her heavenly chariot, and the Syrian Aphrodite Ashtarte was said to have been hatched from an egg nursed by doves. The phrase attributed to Jesus, "Be ye therefore wise as serpents, and harmless as doves" (Matthew 10.16), was no random metaphor but a traditional Syrian invocation.
GS37270. Silver obol, SNG Cop 66 - 67, gVF, grainy, weight 0.767 g, maximum diameter 12.3 mm, die axis 90o, Sikyon mint, obverse laureate head of Apollo right; reverse ΣI, dove flying right; ex CNG; SOLD




  




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Catalog current as of Monday, December 10, 2018.
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Doves