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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Types| ▸ |Chariot||View Options:  |  |  | 

Chariots on Ancient Coins
Roman Republic, L. Procilius L.f., 80 B.C.

|99-50| |B.C.|, |Roman| |Republic,| |L.| |Procilius| |L.f.,| |80| |B.C.|, |denarius| |serratus|
In Roman mythology, Juno was the daughter of Saturn and the wife of Jupiter. Among her many attributes was Juno Sospita, who offered protection to women, accompanying them throughout their lives from birth to death. Women called upon her to aid in conception. Juno Sospita had a two temples at Rome, but her most famous temple was at Lanuvium. Her statue there, as described by Cicero and as depicted on coinage, wore a goatskin coat with a goat-horned headdress. This statue may the one now at the Vatican. Her attribute, the serpent, inhabited a grotto near her temple, and was fed annually by a young girl, who, if a virgin, escaped unharmed, but if not, was destroyed.
RR93384. Silver denarius serratus, Crawford 379/2, Sydenham 772, RSC I Procilia 2, BMCRR I Rome 3147, Russo RBW 1407, SRCV I 307, VF, attractive old collection toning, banker's mark and scratch on cheek, weight 3.936 g, maximum diameter 19.8 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 80 B.C.; obverse head of Juno Sospita clad in goat skin right, S C (senatus consulto - authorized by special decree of the Senate) behind; reverse Juno Sospita in a biga right, brandishing spear and holding shield, snake below, L.PROCILI.F in exergue; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $220.00 SALE |PRICE| $198.00


Capua, Campania, Italy, c. 216 - 214 B.C.

|Italy|, |Capua,| |Campania,| |Italy,| |c.| |216| |-| |214| |B.C.|, |biunx|NEW
The name of Capua comes from the Etruscan Capeva. The meaning is 'City of Marshes.' Its foundation is attributed by Cato the Elder to the Etruscans, and the date given as about 260 years before it was "taken" by Rome. If this is true it refers not to its capture in the Second Punic War (211 B.C.) but to its submission to Rome in 338 B.C., placing the date of foundation at about 600 B.C., while Etruscan power was at its highest. In the area several settlements of the Villanovian civilization were present in prehistoric times, and these were probably enlarged by the Oscans and subsequently by the Etruscans.
GI93427. Bronze biunx, HN Italy 488; SNG Cop 334; SNG ANS 206; BMC Italy p.????, 9; Weber 293; Sambon 1032, aF, scrapes, porosity/corrosion, weight 14.592 g, maximum diameter 24.4 mm, die axis 225o, Capua (Santa Maria Capua Vetere, Italy) mint, c. 216 - 214 B.C.; obverse bearded head of Jupiter right, three pellets behind; reverse Diana driving a biga right, two stars above, Oscan inscription KAPU in exergue; from the Errett Bishop Collection; rare; $145.00 SALE |PRICE| $130.00


Constantine the Great, Early 307 - 22 May 337 A.D.

|Constantine| |the| |Great|, |Constantine| |the| |Great,| |Early| |307| |-| |22| |May| |337| |A.D.|, |reduced| |centenionalis|NEW
The ruins of Antioch on the Orontes lie near the modern city of Antakya, Turkey. Founded near the end of the 4th century B.C. by Seleucus I Nicator, one of Alexander the Great's generals, Antioch's geographic, military and economic location, particularly the spice trade, the Silk Road, the Persian Royal Road, benefited its occupants, and eventually it rivaled Alexandria as the chief city of the Near East and as the main center of Hellenistic Judaism at the end of the Second Temple period. Antioch is called "the cradle of Christianity," for the pivotal early role it played in the emergence of the faith. It was one of the four cities of the Syrian tetrapolis. Its residents are known as Antiochenes. Once a great metropolis of half a million people, it declined to insignificance during the Middle Ages because of warfare, repeated earthquakes and a change in trade routes following the Mongol conquests, which then no longer passed through Antioch from the far east.6th Century Antioch
RL93363. Billon reduced centenionalis, RIC VIII Antioch 39, LRBC I 1374, SRCV V 17488, Voetter 34, Cohen VII 760, Hunter V p. 283, 4 ff. var. (officina), Choice VF, well centered, dark patina, earthen deposits, light marks and porosity, weight 1.637 g, maximum diameter 15.7 mm, die axis 0o, 1st officina, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, posthumous, Sep 337 - 347 A.D.; obverse DV CONSTANTINVS P T AVGG (Divus Constantinus Pater Trium Augusti = Divine Constantine, father of the three emperors), veiled bust right; reverse Constantine in a quadriga right, veiled, the hand of God reaches down to take him to heaven, SMANA in exergue; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $100.00 SALE |PRICE| $90.00


Constantine the Great, Early 307 - 22 May 337 A.D.

|Constantine| |the| |Great|, |Constantine| |the| |Great,| |Early| |307| |-| |22| |May| |337| |A.D.|, |reduced| |centenionalis|
Manus Dei, the hand of God, reaches down to take Constantine up to heaven. Constantine is listed as a saint by the Orthodox Church. Although he is not a Catholic saint, he is revered under the title "The Great" for his contributions to Christianity.
RL93227. Billon reduced centenionalis, RIC VIII Constantinople 37, LRBC I 1041, SRCV VIII 17484, Cohen VII 760, Hunter V -, Choice gVF, well centered, dark brown patina, irregular edge, reverse die wear, weight 1.680 g, maximum diameter 15.9 mm, die axis 180o, Constantinople (Istanbul, Turkey) mint, posthumous, 9 Sep 337 - Apr 340 A.D.; obverse DV CONSTANTINVS P T AVGG (Divus Constantinus Pater Trium Augusti = Divine Constantine, father of the three emperors), veiled bust right; reverse Constantine in quadriga right, veiled, the hand of God reaches down to take him to heaven, CONS in exergue; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $90.00 SALE |PRICE| $81.00


Krannon, Thessaly, Greece, 350 - 300 B.C.

|Thessaly|, |Krannon,| |Thessaly,| |Greece,| |350| |-| |300| |B.C.|, |dichalkon|
In 322 B.C., at Krannon, Thessaly, the Macedonian general Antipater decisively defeated an anti-Macedonian alliance of the Athenians, Aetolians, Thessalians, the Phoceans, the Lokrians and some Peloponnesian states. After the defeat, Athens was forced to abolish its democracy, the leaders responsible for the war were sentenced to death and a Macedonian garrison was stationed at the port of Mounychia.
GB92183. Bronze dichalkon, Rogers 199; BMC Thessaly p. 16, 5 var. (no obv letter); SNG Cop 43 var. (same); SGCV I 2073, aVF, dark patina, minor earthen deposits, weight 4.923 g, maximum diameter 18.1 mm, die axis 180o, Krannon mint, 350 - 300 B.C.; obverse horseman galloping right, wearing petasos and chlamys, K (control symbol) upper left; reverse K-PA/NNO, hydria (water carrying vessel) mounted on cart; ex Frascatius Ancient Coins; ex Gorny & Mosch auction 165 (17 Mar 2008), part of lot 2515; $85.00 SALE |PRICE| $76.50







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